Technology

Judge: Outdated caselaw needs revised to handle Internet issues

July 16, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
A dissenting judge in an unfair competition case involving the near simultaneous registrations of the same Internet domain name urged the Indiana Legislature and Supreme Court to “usher Indiana into the technological realities of the 21st Century.”
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State courts to adopt e-filing in 2015

May 22, 2014
Dave Stafford
Indiana courts will switch to electronic filing beginning next year, according to an order issued Thursday by the Indiana Supreme Court.
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Law firms should be concerned about cybersecurity

May 7, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
The real dollars are paid on the black market for inside details about possible mergers and acquisitions, new public policy, and information about cutting-edge technology. In short, the kind of private, confidential information that many law firms hold in their client files.
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ABA warns against 'liking' potential jurors

May 7, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Lawyers and judges say the opinion on the use of social media is needed.
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Foos: Microsoft Surface Pro for the mobile attorney

May 7, 2014
Robert Foos Jr. writes about how the Microsoft Surface Pro caught his eye as an alternative to the Apple iPad.
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Finney: 8 steps to evaluating and selecting your firm’s software

May 7, 2014
Deanna Finney
Oftentimes firms select software based upon performance during a software demonstration rather than evaluating what will provide the best results for specific firm needs. Finding the right software requires identification of job requirements including process workflows prior to selecting the tool.
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ABA: Lawyers should not contact jurors through social media

April 24, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
Attorneys can look at a juror’s public Facebook page but shouldn’t message the juror through the Internet or social media and try to access a private account, according to a formal opinion released Thursday by the American Bar Association.
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Court video project exposes problems

April 23, 2014
Dave Stafford
The Supreme Court wanted feedback on a pilot project using an audio-video record as the official appellate transcript in three Indiana courts. Lawyers at a recent discussion on the topic appear to favor pulling the plug.
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Mediation by monitor

April 23, 2014
Dave Stafford
The rise of online dispute resolution is seen as both a challenge and an opportunity for alternative dispute resolution.
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Attorneys now can hyperlink in e-filing in Southern District

April 15, 2014
IL Staff
Reference materials in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana are now just a click away. Attorneys may now use active hyperlinks within e-filed documents.
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Court video online raises call for blanket cellphone policy

February 21, 2014
Dave Stafford
Another recent incident of video streamed online that could compromise criminal courts has led judges in Marion County to consider a blanket policy restricting cellphone use in courtrooms.
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Southern District testing inclusion of links in documents

February 14, 2014
IL Staff
The U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana announced this week that it is beginning a pilot program that will let the court and attorneys include active hyperlinks within e-filed and court-issued documents.
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Start Page: Tips for catching up after snow days

February 12, 2014
We’re already over a month in to 2014. So far, the weather has wreaked havoc on school and work schedules. If you are like me, the list of things to accomplish has only gotten longer as a result. The solution? Use your technology tools more efficiently. Here are three concepts and related tips to help you (and me) dig out and catch up.
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Attorneys finding more link rot online

January 29, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Just a few days after the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals issued its opinion in his case, attorney Brian Paul searched for the website the court had cited and discovered not everything on the Internet is permanent.
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Courts warn of email scam using phony court cases

January 17, 2014
IL Staff
The United States Courts cautioned attorneys this week about an email scam in which the emails purporting to come from federal and state courts are infecting recipients with computer viruses.
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Judge finds Google's book project 'transformative'

December 4, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Attorneys differ on whether the recent ruling benefits society or opens the door for infringement.
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Start Page: Is your data in the cloud really out of (your) control?

December 4, 2013
In today’s rapidly changing technology environment, programmers update software frequently. Your choice: accept the changes or move on. When was the last time you went more than a day without an update request from your smartphone?
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Indiana shares in Google cookie settlement

November 18, 2013
IL Staff
Indiana is one of 28 states that will share in a $17 million settlement agreement with Google Inc. over its unauthorized placement of cookies on computers using Apple’s Safari Web browsers in 2011 and 2012.
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Technology levels the legal playing field

November 6, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Attorneys find hardware and software make them more effective and efficient.
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Finney: Is trial technology a reasonable and necessary expense?

November 6, 2013
Deanna Finney
A recent decision from the Nevada District Court, Clark County, demonstrated that technology at trial is a valued component and not merely a dog-and-pony show. The dispute at hand centered upon unpaid expenses for trial technology that had been deemed as not a “reasonable and necessary” expense.
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Indy attorney ID card fee to increase, but so should perks

September 27, 2013
Dave Stafford
The fee lawyers pay for identification allowing them to avoid security checkpoint lines at the City-County Building in Indianapolis will increase, but so will the functionality of the cards, according to a proposal adopted Friday.
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Commemorating Constitution Day? There’s an app for that

September 17, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Just in time for Constitution Day, there is now an app for constitutional case law.
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JTAC oversight committee sets initial meeting

September 13, 2013
Dave Stafford
The first meeting of the committee created by the Legislature to oversee the Indiana Supreme Court’s technology initiatives – chief among them continued implementation of the Odyssey case management system – will take place Tuesday morning.
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Professor outlines how technology is changing the practice of law

September 11, 2013
Dave Stafford
As robots and computers entered factories, manufacturing became “advanced manufacturing,” bringing increased production at a lower cost.  That upheaval, the result of innovations in technology, is now being felt within the legal profession. William Henderson, professor of law and director of the Center on the Global Legal Profession at Indiana University Maurer School of Law, explained that the growing legal services industry, populated largely by nonlawyers, is mechanizing and automating the work attorneys do, creating products that can be sold for a relatively cheap price.
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South Bend mayor: City leads ‘open-data’ effort

September 4, 2013
Dave Stafford
South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg said there were plenty of reasons the city decided to embrace an open-data policy, putting as many public records as possible online with a pioneering city website, Open Data South Bend.
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  1. Whether you support "gay marriage" or not is not the issue. The issue is whether the SCOTUS can extract from an unmentionable somewhere the notion that the Constitution forbids government "interference" in the "right" to marry. Just imagine time-traveling to Philadelphia in 1787. Ask James Madison if the document he and his fellows just wrote allowed him- or forbade government to "interfere" with- his "right" to marry George Washington? He would have immediately- and justly- summoned the Sergeant-at-Arms to throw your sorry self out into the street. Far from being a day of liberation, this is a day of capitulation by the Rule of Law to the Rule of What's Happening Now.

  2. With today's ruling, AG Zoeller's arguments in the cases of Obamacare and Same-sex Marriage can be relegated to the ash heap of history. 0-fer

  3. She must be a great lawyer

  4. Ind. Courts - "Illinois ranks 49th for how court system serves disadvantaged" What about Indiana? A story today from Dave Collins of the AP, here published in the Benton Illinois Evening News, begins: Illinois' court system had the third-worst score in the nation among state judiciaries in serving poor, disabled and other disadvantaged members of the public, according to new rankings. Illinois' "Justice Index" score of 34.5 out of 100, determined by the nonprofit National Center for Access to Justice, is based on how states serve people with disabilities and limited English proficiency, how much free legal help is available and how states help increasing numbers of people representing themselves in court, among other issues. Connecticut led all states with a score of 73.4 and was followed by Hawaii, Minnesota, New York and Delaware, respectively. Local courts in Washington, D.C., had the highest overall score at 80.9. At the bottom was Oklahoma at 23.7, followed by Kentucky, Illinois, South Dakota and Indiana. ILB: That puts Indiana at 46th worse. More from the story: Connecticut, Hawaii, Minnesota, Colorado, Tennessee and Maine had perfect 100 scores in serving people with disabilities, while Indiana, Georgia, Wyoming, Missouri and Idaho had the lowest scores. Those rankings were based on issues such as whether interpretation services are offered free to the deaf and hearing-impaired and whether there are laws or rules allowing service animals in courthouses. The index also reviewed how many civil legal aid lawyers were available to provide free legal help. Washington, D.C., had nearly nine civil legal aid lawyers per 10,000 people in poverty, the highest rate in the country. Texas had the lowest rate, 0.43 legal aid lawyers per 10,000 people in poverty. http://indianalawblog.com/archives/2014/11/ind_courts_illi_1.html

  5. A very thorough opinion by the federal court. The Rooker-Feldman analysis, in particular, helps clear up muddy water as to the entanglement issue. Looks like the Seventh Circuit is willing to let its district courts cruise much closer to the Indiana Supreme Court's shorelines than most thought likely, at least when the ADA on the docket. Some could argue that this case and Praekel, taken together, paint a rather unflattering picture of how the lower courts are being advised as to their duties under the ADA. A read of the DOJ amicus in Praekel seems to demonstrate a less-than-congenial view toward the higher echelons in the bureaucracy.

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