William Conour

Attorney did not breach any duty owed to Conour clients

April 22, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
An Indianapolis attorney who spent several years working in a firm with attorney William Conour satisfied his legal duty to clients of Conour based on his lack of knowledge of any specific wrongdoing by Conour related to the clients, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled. Conour is currently in federal prison for stealing from client settlement funds.
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Aiding Conour victims ‘The right thing to do’

March 25, 2015
Dave Stafford
The Indiana State Bar Association’s announcement that it will distribute $100,000 among 24 victims of former attorney and convicted fraudster William Conour is a modest but meaningful gesture from the legal community, attorneys involved with the decision say.
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ISBA fund awards $100,000 to Conour victims

March 9, 2015
IL Staff
The Indiana State Bar Association Clients’ Financial Assistance Fund Committee has given $100,000 to victims who suffered losses due to the dishonest acts of ex-attorney William Conour, the ISBA announced Monday. The money was divided among 24 victims.
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CNBC’s ‘American Greed’ puts focus on Conour as appeal proceeds

January 9, 2015
Dave Stafford
The CNBC program “American Greed,” which bills itself as a “shocking true crime series (that) examines the dark side of the American Dream,” has taped an episode profiling former Indianapolis lawyer and convicted fraudster William Conour.
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Government: Tweak Conour release conditions

January 5, 2015
Dave Stafford
Special conditions imposed on convicted fraudster and former attorney William Conour after he serves a 10-year federal sentence should be modified, but the conditions largely should stay in place, according to the government’s brief in his appeal.
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Conour victim settles suit naming Doehrman

December 18, 2014
Dave Stafford
Victims of convicted fraudster and former attorney William Conour have settled a lawsuit that named a one-time Conour associate as a defendant.
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Conour pursues wire fraud appeal

December 17, 2014
Dave Stafford
As ex-attorney William Conour’s appeal of his conviction and 10-year sentence on a federal wire fraud charge moves ahead, so do victim lawsuits that seek to collect damages from colleagues who practiced with him years earlier and from a Conour creditor.
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Conour appeal focuses on defense withdrawal, sentencing terms

December 3, 2014
Dave Stafford
Convicted fraudster and ex-attorney William Conour’s appeal of his conviction and 10-year sentence on a federal wire fraud charge argues the court failed to investigate his defense counsel’s withdrawal. His appeal also claims that the court wrongly imposed “suspicionless” searches and other conditions of supervised release following his imprisonment.
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Conour malpractice carrier wins rescission of coverage

October 10, 2014
Dave Stafford
The insurance company that provided malpractice coverage to ex-attorney and convicted fraudster William Conour prevailed in its civil suit against him, but his many victims still may receive a small amount from the case.
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Judge orders federal defender to turn over Conour funds

July 24, 2014
Dave Stafford
A judge has ordered Indiana Federal Community Defenders Inc. to turn over money it is holding in a trust account belonging to convicted fraudster and former attorney William Conour.
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Judge asks public defender about Conour money

June 13, 2014
Dave Stafford
A federal judge has ordered the Office of the Federal Defender for the Southern District of Indiana to disclose whether it is holding any property belonging to William Conour, the former attorney who was represented by a public court-appointed lawyer from the agency.
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Conour claims restitution paid, that he's owed money

May 30, 2014
Dave Stafford
Former attorney and convicted fraudster William Conour has asked the federal court where he admitted he stole $6.5 million from dozens of wrongful-death and personal-injury clients to cut him a check for $184,214.26.
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Conour defender asks to withdraw from 7th Circuit appeal

May 5, 2014
Dave Stafford
The public defender appointed to represent convicted fraudster and former leading personal-injury attorney William Conour has asked the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals to withdraw from the case, citing an unspecified conflict of interest.
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Government drops Conour sentence appeal

April 22, 2014
Dave Stafford
The U.S. attorney’s office will no longer seek a longer prison sentence for convicted legal fraudster William Conour, according to documents filed recently in the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals. Conour’s appeal will move forward.
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Conour appeals fraud conviction, 10-year sentence

December 12, 2013
Dave Stafford
Former attorney William Conour will appeal his conviction and 10-year prison sentence imposed after he pleaded guilty to a single count of wire fraud.
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Government may appeal Conour’s 10-year sentence

December 4, 2013
Dave Stafford
Federal prosecutors who argued for tougher punishment may appeal the 10-year sentence imposed in October for former attorney William Conour who pleaded guilty to a single count of wire fraud.
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Conour assets raise more than $105,000 at auction

November 22, 2013
Dave Stafford
An auction of art, wine and household furnishings seized from the former Carmel home of convicted ex-attorney William Conour fetched more than $105,000, most of which will go toward restitution for his client victims.
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Conour online asset auction begins, will run 2 weeks

November 5, 2013
Dave Stafford
An auction of wine, art, home furnishings and other assets seized from the Carmel home of imprisoned former wrongful-death attorney William Conour begins Tuesday and will continue for two weeks, according to the Texas auction company handling the sale.
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Conour’s 10-year sentence disappoints victims

October 23, 2013
Dave Stafford
Judge says the former attorney’s theft of nearly $7 million from clients casts a shadow over the legal profession.
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10-year Conour sentence disappoints victims

October 17, 2013
Dave Stafford
Victims of disgraced wrongful-death and personal-injury attorney William Conour said his 10-year sentence imposed on a wire fraud charge – half the maximum he could have received – left them feeling victimized again.
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Conour gets 10-year fraud sentence

October 17, 2013
Dave Stafford
Former attorney William Conour has been sentenced to 10 years in federal prison for defrauding more than 30 wrongful-death and personal-injury clients of close to $7 million.
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In arguing for leniency, Conour cites previous ‘stellar’ career

October 16, 2013
Dave Stafford
Convicted former attorney William Conour argues in a court filing Wednesday that he deserves leniency in sentencing and should receive less than the minimum advisory range of 14 to 17.5 years in federal prison for defrauding three-dozen clients of nearly $7 million.
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Prosecution wants 20-year sentence for Conour, now accused of stealing nearly $7 million

October 15, 2013
Dave Stafford
Citing his lack of remorse for the theft of nearly $7 million from clients over the years, federal prosecutors want former wrongful-death and personal-injury attorney William Conour sentenced to the maximum term of 20 years Thursday, according to a sentencing memorandum filed Tuesday.
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Prosecution: Conour deserves 20 years; victim tally now nearly $7 million

October 15, 2013
Dave Stafford
The toll from fraud perpetrated by former wrongful-death and personal-injury attorney William Conour has increased significantly from earlier estimates, federal prosecutors said in a sentencing memorandum filed Tuesday.
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Conour victims number 33, court filing reveals

September 18, 2013
Dave Stafford
A defense request for more time to object to a presentence investigation report discloses that the number of victims of former leading personal-injury attorney William Conour is 33, more than the number the government has previously alleged.
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  1. People have heard of Magna Carta, and not the Provisions of Oxford & Westminster. Not that anybody really cares. Today, it might be considered ethnic or racial bias to talk about the "Anglo Saxon common law." I don't even see the word English in the blurb above. Anyhow speaking of Edward I-- he was famously intolerant of diversity himself viz the Edict of Expulsion 1290. So all he did too like making parliament a permanent institution-- that all must be discredited. 100 years from now such commemorations will be in the dustbin of history.

  2. Oops, I meant discipline, not disciple. Interesting that those words share such a close relationship. We attorneys are to be disciples of the law, being disciplined to serve the law and its source, the constitutions. Do that, and the goals of Magna Carta are advanced. Do that not and Magna Carta is usurped. Do that not and you should be disciplined. Do that and you should be counted a good disciple. My experiences, once again, do not reveal a process that is adhering to the due process ideals of Magna Carta. Just the opposite, in fact. Braveheart's dying rebel (for a great cause) yell comes to mind.

  3. It is not a sign of the times that many Ind licensed attorneys (I am not) would fear writing what I wrote below, even if they had experiences to back it up. Let's take a minute to thank God for the brave Baron's who risked death by torture to tell the government that it was in the wrong. Today is a career ruination that whistleblowers risk. That is often brought on by denial of licenses or disciple for those who dare speak truth to power. Magna Carta says truth rules power, power too often claims that truth matters not, only Power. Fight such power for the good of our constitutional republics. If we lose them we have only bureaucratic tyranny to pass onto our children. Government attorneys, of all lawyers, should best realize this and work to see our patrimony preserved. I am now a government attorney (once again) in Kansas, and respecting the rule of law is my passion, first and foremost.

  4. I have dealt with more than a few I-465 moat-protected government attorneys and even judges who just cannot seem to wrap their heads around the core of this 800 year old document. I guess monarchial privileges and powers corrupt still ..... from an academic website on this fantastic "treaty" between the King and the people ... "Enduring Principles of Liberty Magna Carta was written by a group of 13th-century barons to protect their rights and property against a tyrannical king. There are two principles expressed in Magna Carta that resonate to this day: "No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned, disseised, outlawed, banished, or in any way destroyed, nor will We proceed against or prosecute him, except by the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land." "To no one will We sell, to no one will We deny or delay, right or justice." Inspiration for Americans During the American Revolution, Magna Carta served to inspire and justify action in liberty’s defense. The colonists believed they were entitled to the same rights as Englishmen, rights guaranteed in Magna Carta. They embedded those rights into the laws of their states and later into the Constitution and Bill of Rights. The Fifth Amendment to the Constitution ("no person shall . . . be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.") is a direct descendent of Magna Carta's guarantee of proceedings according to the "law of the land." http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/magna_carta/

  5. I'm not sure what's more depressing: the fact that people would pay $35,000 per year to attend an unaccredited law school, or the fact that the same people "are hanging in there and willing to follow the dean’s lead in going forward" after the same school fails to gain accreditation, rendering their $70,000 and counting education worthless. Maybe it's a good thing these people can't sit for the bar.

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