Death Penalty

Supreme Court rejects appeal under NC racial bias law

October 3, 2016
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States will not hear an appeal from four former death row inmates in North Carolina who claimed systemic racial bias contributed to their death sentences.
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Death row inmate’s habeas petition denied by 7th Circuit

August 29, 2016
Jennifer Nelson
The man who brutally raped and murdered a teenager in Spencer County in 2001 will continue to sit on death row after the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the denial of his petition for habeas corpus relief.
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Feds: Charleston church shooting suspect 'self-radicalized'

August 23, 2016
 Associated Press
A white man charged with the shooting deaths of nine black churchgoers in Charleston "self-radicalized" in the months before the attack and grew more entrenched in his beliefs in white supremacy, according to court papers prosecutors filed this week in federal court.
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Groups cite inadequate funds to defend death row inmate

August 22, 2016
 Associated Press
Five legal groups are supporting a Missouri death row inmate, whose execution was halted hours before it was to be carried out in 2014, saying that he can't receive an adequate defense with the money allocated.
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Attorneys argue Indiana death penalty unconstitutional

August 22, 2016
 Associated Press
Attorneys for a Lake County man who faces charges in the deaths of seven women have argued in court filings that the state of Indiana's death penalty law is unconstitutional.
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Attorneys for Dylann Roof file death penalty challenge

August 2, 2016
 Associated Press
Attorneys for the man charged with killing nine people at a Charleston church are challenging federal prosecutors' intention to seek the death penalty against him.
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Prosecutor to seek death penalty in Indy ‘Purge’ killings

July 26, 2016
 Associated Press
Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry said Tuesday he will seek the death penalty in the case of a 19-year-old Indianapolis man charged with fatally shooting three people over four days in May.
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Indiana man on death row for 4 killings runs out of appeals

July 11, 2016
 Associated Press
A Fort Wayne man who's been on death row since 1999 for killing his brother and three other men has exhausted his appeals.
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Charleston church shooting suspect wants federal case dismissed

July 6, 2016
 Associated Press
Dylann Roof's defense team is challenging the constitutionality of the federal hate crimes law, a legal longshot they say they'll drop if prosecutors agree not to pursue the death penalty in the killings of nine people inside a South Carolina church.
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Man charged in cop's death again asks to represent self

June 20, 2016
 Associated Press
A man accused of killing an Indianapolis police officer in 2014 has again asked to represent himself in court.
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Justices find judicial bias in Pennsylvania death row case

June 9, 2016
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States ruled Thursday that the former chief justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court was wrong to participate in the case of a death row inmate whose prosecution he personally approved nearly 30 years earlier.
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US justices take death row appeals, Virginia redistricting case

June 6, 2016
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States accepted three cases Monday, including two that claim race is a factor.
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Attorneys for death row inmate seek more time for appeal

May 24, 2016
 Associated Press
Attorneys for a Gary man sentenced to death for killing his wife and two teenage stepchildren have asked a magistrate to give him more time to sign a document needed for the case to be reviewed.
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Supreme Court throws out death sentence from all-white jury

May 23, 2016
 Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled decisively in favor of a death-row inmate in Georgia on Monday, chastising state prosecutors for improperly keeping African-Americans off the jury that convicted him of killing a white woman.
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Supreme Court upholds man’s death sentence

April 12, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Supreme Court affirmed a man’s death sentence Tuesday after he pleaded guilty to brutally murdering a woman.
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Man on death row loses habeas petition before 7th Circuit

March 23, 2016
Scott Roberts
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld rulings lifting a stay on a man’s habeas corpus petition and dismissing his claims after the appellate court held his claims could be decided based on the state-court record.
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Jury selection scheduled in killing of Gary police officer

March 10, 2016
 Associated Press
Jury selection has been scheduled to begin in January in the trial of a man accused of killing of a Gary police officer.
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Supreme Court denies hearing Indiana death penalty case

March 2, 2016
IL Staff
The United States Supreme Court denied a writ of certiorari filed in the case of Tommy Pruitt, meaning the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals decision that reversed the death penalty for Pruitt will stand.
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SCOTUS rejects Evansville SWAT raid, death penalty appeals

February 29, 2016
Dave Stafford
A 7th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling against the city of Evansville for a bungled SWAT raid will stand, as will the death sentence of a Gary man convicted in the 2007 shooting deaths of his wife and two stepchildren. The U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear those appeals Monday.
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Justices: Kentucky death sentence wrongly overturned

December 14, 2015
 Associated Press
Justices ruled Monday that a federal appeals court was wrong to overturn Roger Wheeler's sentence based on the exclusion of a juror who expressed reservations about the death penalty.
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New Albany man challenges death sentence in 2012 murder

December 10, 2015
 Associated Press
An attorney for a southern Indiana man convicted of killing three women argued Thursday that his death sentence in one of the slayings should be thrown out because the judge didn't sufficiently consider the importance of his confession.
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Suspected killer cancels request to represent himself

November 19, 2015
 Associated Press
A northwest Indiana man charged with strangling two women has decided not to represent himself during his upcoming trial.
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Gary man charged with killing 2 seeks to represent himself

November 17, 2015
 Associated Press
A northwest Indiana man charged with strangling two women and who could face the death penalty if convicted is asking a judge to allow him to represent himself during the trial.
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Murder exonoree to speak at IU McKinney

November 11, 2015
IL Staff
An Ohio man sentenced to death for the 1975 murder of a money-order salesman in Cleveland and later declared innocent in 2015 will speak at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law Friday.
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Supreme Court troubled by DA's rejection of black jurors

November 3, 2015
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States appears troubled by the actions of a Georgia prosecutor in disqualifying all the black prospective jurors from the death penalty trial of a black teenager who was accused of killing an elderly white woman.
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  1. He TIL team,please zap this comment too since it was merely marking a scammer and not reflecting on the story. Thanks, happy Monday, keep up the fine work.

  2. You just need my social security number sent to your Gmail account to process then loan, right? Beware scammers indeed.

  3. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

  4. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  5. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

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