guilty plea

Michigan sports doctor pleads guilty in child porn case

July 11, 2017
 Associated Press
A former Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics doctor pleaded guilty Tuesday to possessing child pornography, admitting he tried to get rid of the evidence last fall while police were investigating allegations that he had sexually assaulted young female athletes.
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Mental exam ordered for Indiana mom who suffocated her kids

July 11, 2017
 Associated Press
A judge in Fort Wayne on Monday ordered a mental competency exam for an Indiana woman who pleaded guilty but mentally ill in the suffocation deaths of her two children last year and still faces charges in the fatal shooting of a neighbor.
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Anderson lawyer pleads guilty in estate misappropriation case

June 2, 2017
 Associated Press
Suspended Anderson attorney Stephen Schuyler has pleaded guilty in connection with the alleged misappropriation of funds from six estates totaling more than $700,000.
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Indiana woman pleads guilty in abuse death of daughter, 3

May 2, 2017
 Associated Press
A southern Indiana woman has pleaded guilty in her 3-year-old daughter's abuse death and injuries suffered by the girl's older sibling.
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‘Purge’ shooter pleads guilty to murder, robbery

April 28, 2017
 Associated Press, IL Staff
A suspect in Indianapolis’ May 2016 “purge” killing has pleaded guilty to murder and felony armed robbery, the Marion County Prosecutor’s Office announced Friday.
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Clarksville man gets 35 years in abuse death of 3-year-old

April 25, 2017
 Associated Press
A southern Indiana man has been sentenced to 35 years in prison after pleading guilty in the child abuse death of his former girlfriend's 3-year-old daughter.
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Man pleads guilty in fatal shooting of Indianapolis officer

April 21, 2017
 Associated Press
A 27-year-old man on Friday pleaded guilty to murder in the fatal shooting of an Indianapolis police officer, in a deal that spares him the death penalty.
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Northern Indiana sheriff pleads guilty to intimidation

April 5, 2017
 Associated Press
A northern Indiana sheriff pleaded guilty to an intimidation charge as his trial on bribery and other counts was about to begin.
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Supreme Court rules man cannot convert felony theft conviction

March 28, 2017
Olivia Covington
A Lake County man will retain his felony theft conviction after the Indiana Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that an amendment to Indiana Code does not invalidate the man’s agreement to not seek misdemeanor treatment.
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Kentucky lawyer pleads guilty in massive disability scheme

March 27, 2017
 Associated Press
A flamboyant Kentucky lawyer who billed himself as "Mr. Social Security" pleaded guilty Friday for his role in what prosecutors portrayed as a long-running scheme to defraud the government of nearly $600 million in federal disability payments.
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Deal reached in Indiana homicide case of body in suitcase

March 24, 2017
 Associated Press
A man accused of killing an Indiana woman nearly two years ago has entered a guilty plea after striking a deal with prosecutors.
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Clarksville man changes mind, takes deal in abuse death

March 22, 2017
 Associated Press
A southern Indiana man has reversed himself again and agreed to plead guilty in the child abuse death of his former girlfriend's 3-year-old daughter.
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COA rejects ineffective counsel claim based on judge’s sentencing practices

March 15, 2017
Olivia Covington
A man who pleaded guilty to child molesting cannot prove that he received ineffective assistance of trial counsel, the Indiana Court of Appeals held Wednesday, but the post-conviction court must still address the issue of whether his plea was voluntary.
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COA orders post-conviction court to reduce criminal confinement sentence

March 14, 2017
Olivia Covington
A man who pleaded guilty to criminal confinement will have his sentence reduced by eight years after the Indiana Court of Appeals held Tuesday that his trial attorney’s erroneous counsel led the man to make the decision to reject a previous plea agreement.
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Woman gets time served in Indianapolis quadruple homicide

March 9, 2017
 Associated Press
An Indianapolis woman has been sentenced to time served after pleading guilty to conspiracy to commit robbery in connection with a quadruple slaying during an Indianapolis drug house robbery.
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Indiana judge rejects man's plea deal in crash that killed 3

March 3, 2017
 Associated Press
A western Indiana judge has rejected a man's plea agreement in a one-vehicle crash that killed his three teenage passengers in 2015.
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Court of Appeals reverses convictions after due process violation

February 15, 2017
Olivia Covington
The Indiana Court of Appeals has reversed a man’s convictions of neglect of a dependent and battery after finding that his due process rights were violated when the state withdrew its plea agreement after he had pleaded guilty.
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Prosecutor files charges against restaurant owners underreporting sales

February 9, 2017
Olivia Covington
The owners of five Mexican restaurants across Indiana who are accused of underreporting nearly $2 million in sales are now facing criminal charges in Marion Superior Court.
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Spencer man pleads guilty in abduction, slaying of toddler

February 6, 2017
 Associated Press
Court records show a southern Indiana man has agreed to plead guilty to the murder and kidnapping of a 1-year-old girl under a deal in which prosecutors would dismiss other charges including rape and child molesting.
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Takata to pay $1B, plead guilty in US air bag probe

January 16, 2017
 Bloomberg News
Takata Corp. admitted to hiding the deadly risks of its exploding air bags for about 15 years in an agreement to pay U.S. regulators, consumers and car manufacturers $1 billion in penalties. The faulty air bags have been linked to at least 17 deaths worldwide.
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VW pleads guilty in emissions scandal; 6 employees indicted

January 11, 2017
 Associated Press
Volkswagen is pleading guilty to three criminal charges and will pay $4.3 billion to the U.S. government for cheating on emissions tests and destroying evidence in an elaborate cover-up.
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Mother gets 30-year sentence in death of 4-month-old

January 6, 2017
 Associated Press
A 30-year prison sentence has been handed a 21-year-old Muncie woman who pleaded guilty in connection with the death of her infant son.
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COA: Trial court’s erroneous statement did not change terms of plea agreement

December 29, 2016
Olivia Covington
A man convicted of drug-related charges must adhere to the waiver of his right  to appeal his sentence as part of his plea deal after the Indiana Court of Appeals found Thursday that the trial court’s erroneous statement did not change the terms of that agreement.
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Last of 5 convicted in fatal house explosion is sentenced

December 29, 2016
 Associated Press
A man who was among five people convicted in a deadly Indianapolis house explosion received a three-year prison sentence, with one year suspended Wednesday, becoming the final defendant sentenced for the blast prosecutors said was a plot to claim insurance money.
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Indiana judge gives father 40 years in 5-year-old's death

December 14, 2016
 Associated Press
An Indiana judge has sentenced a 35-year-old man to 40 years in prison for the death of his 5-year-old son who was found bound and beaten.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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