labor and employment

Justices question meaning of EBITDA in HHGregg manager bonus case

February 23, 2017
Olivia Covington
After a key member of HHGregg’s leadership team died in 2012, his $40 million life insurance policy was paid out to the company and brought that year’s total earnings to $143.5 million. Now, senior managers on the HHGregg team say they should receive bonuses based on the total 2012 earnings, claiming that the life insurance policy propelled the company to an earnings level that warranted extra compensation for their work.
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Supreme Court to hear HHGregg, managers’ incentive fight

February 22, 2017
Dave Stafford
The Indiana Supreme Court will hear a case Feb. 23 in which a trial court and the Indiana Court of Appeals reached opposite conclusions about whether key HHGregg managers were entitled to incentive bonuses triggered by the company’s receipt of $40 million from an executive’s life insurance proceeds.
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Trump's second pick for Labor differs more in style than policy

February 17, 2017
 Bloomberg News
President Donald Trump’s second nominee for labor secretary,  R. Alexander Acosta, represents a bigger contrast with the prior pick on biography and personal style than on policy substance.
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Trump names law school dean as new choice to become labor secretary

February 16, 2017
 Associated Press
President Donald Trump on Thursday announced law school dean R. Alexander Acosta as his new labor secretary nominee, one day after his original pick abruptly withdrew from consideration.
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Court denies motions attacking jury verdict for worker in wage suit

February 10, 2017
Dave Stafford
A federal judge Thursday rejected motions for judgment in its favor or a new trial by employers who lost a jury trial over unpaid wages to a Terre Haute worker.
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COA affirms summary judgment against Celadon in class action

February 7, 2017
Olivia Covington
The Indiana Court of Appeals has affirmed summary judgment against a prominent trucking company in a class-action lawsuit, holding that the terms of the company’s contract with its independent drivers require the company to deduct the cost of fuel from their compensation based only on the lowest discounted price.
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Judge rules for Teamsters, notes plaintiff’s gambling bills

January 26, 2017
Dave Stafford
The owner of a defunct trucking business who sued an Indianapolis Teamsters local alleging interference with business relationships lost her case, and a judge used his order to point out that money withdrawn from the company’s bank account for gambling sprees occurred at the same time the union alleged its health benefits went unpaid.
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Former IDEM employee's lawsuit highlights risks, rewards for whistleblowers

January 25, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
Suzanne Esserman claims the Indiana Department of Environmental Management fired her for questioning payments to private contractors, so she's filed a whistleblower lawsuit.
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COA: Company cannot withhold ‘voluntary’ deductions from ex-employee's pay

January 23, 2017
Olivia Covington
A plumbing and electrical company cannot impose “voluntary” tax deductions on a former employee’s final paycheck without statutory authority, nor can it force that employee to pay a $1,000 insurance deductible after an auto accident, the Indiana Court of Appeals held Monday.
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Justices to weigh limits on worker rights to sue employers

January 16, 2017
 Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court said Friday it will decide whether employers can require workers to sign arbitration agreements that prevent them from pursuing group claims in court.
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Gary councilwoman challenges accusations of law violation

January 4, 2017
 Associated Press
A city councilwoman has filed a lawsuit to keep her second job as an employee of the Gary Sanitary District.
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Former IDEM employee’s unlawful termination case can continue

December 29, 2016
Olivia Covington
A former Indiana state employee can continue her case against the Indiana Department of Environmental Management after the Court of Appeals decided Thursday that her unlawful termination complaint stated a claim upon which relief can be granted and that sovereign immunity cannot apply.
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COA upholds dismissal of fired DOT employee’s untimely petition for review

December 29, 2016
Jennifer Nelson
A former employee of the Indiana Department of Transportation, who was fired in 2013, untimely filed his petition for judicial review after he was unsuccessful in his administrative appeals and the trial court correctly dismissed his petition, the Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed Thursday.
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Employers, labor lawyers left hanging as judge blocks OT rule

December 28, 2016
Dave Stafford
Companies and the employment lawyers who advise them had, in many cases, worked for months planning to comply with new Department of Labor regulations affecting millions of salaried employees who are exempt from overtime pay. All they know after a judge blocked the rule is that they don’t know what’s next.
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RV plant-closing lawsuit proceeds

December 14, 2016
IL Staff
Workers at a northern Indiana recreational vehicle plant that closed in June may proceed with a lawsuit alleging company management failed to notify workers about the closing as federal law requires.
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COA: Law enforcement may not refuse to hire based solely on expunged criminal histories

December 8, 2016
Olivia Covington
The Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Thursday that law enforcement agencies are not permitted under state statute to refuse to hire new employees solely because those people have prior criminal histories that have since been expunged.
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COA holds that volunteer work was incidental to man’s employment

December 7, 2016
Olivia Covington
A general contractor’s volunteer work was incidental to his professional employment, so the injuries he sustained during the volunteer work must be covered under the Indiana Worker’s Compensation Act.
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Some Indiana employers abiding by overtime rule, even though it's in limbo

December 6, 2016
Hayleigh Colombo, IBJ Staff
The Obama administration’s new overtime rule is held up in federal court, but that hasn't stopped some Indiana employers from instituting changes to comply with the law.
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7th Circuit rules student-athletes aren’t considered ‘employees’

December 6, 2016
Olivia Covington
Collegiate athletes cannot be considered university employees and, thus, are not eligible for minimum wage pay, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Monday, affirming a district court decision that dismissed a lawsuit brought against the NCAA.
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Indiana Supreme Court considers general contractor’s duty of care to subcontractors

December 1, 2016
Olivia Covington
In oral arguments on a petition to transfer a case regarding a general contractor’s duty of care to its subcontractors, the justices of the Indiana Supreme Court considered the meaning of the phrase “monitor and implement.”
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Judge: Sysco must face Teamsters suit over retirement benefits

November 23, 2016
Dave Stafford
A local division of foodservice-supply giant Sysco Systems must face a lawsuit from its Teamsters workers who say the company reneged on retirement benefits negotiated through collective bargaining.
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Court blocks federal plan to extend overtime pay to many

November 23, 2016
 Associated Press
In a blow to the Obama administration's labor-law plans, a federal court has blocked the start of a rule that would have made an estimated 4 million more American workers eligible for overtime pay heading into the holiday season.
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Justices consider relevance of immigration status in undocumented worker’s lawsuit

November 22, 2016
Olivia Covington
The Indiana Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday on whether introducing an injured man's immigration status to a jury in his lawsuit for future wages would be prejudicial enough to outweigh its probative value.
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Woman’s wage suit against Indiana medical supplier goes forward

November 3, 2016
Dave Stafford
A federal judge has rejected an Indiana-based medical supplier’s effort to dismiss a former employee’s lawsuit seeking enhanced damages over withheld pay.
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ISP officer loses whistleblower appeal

November 2, 2016
Dave Stafford
State workers alleging retaliation for whistleblower activities must first exhaust all administrative remedies before suing, the Indiana Court of Appeals held Wednesday, affirming a trial court ruling against a 27-year Indiana State Police officer.
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  1. File under the Sociology of Hoosier Discipline ... “We will be answering the complaint in due course and defending against the commission’s allegations,” said Indianapolis attorney Don Lundberg, who’s representing Hudson in her disciplinary case. FOR THOSE WHO DO NOT KNOW ... Lundberg ran the statist attorney disciplinary machinery in Indy for decades, and is now the "go to guy" for those who can afford him .... the ultimate insider for the well-to-do and/or connected who find themselves in the crosshairs. It would appear that this former prosecutor knows how the game is played in Circle City ... and is sacrificing accordingly. See more on that here ... http://www.theindianalawyer.com/supreme-court-reprimands-attorney-for-falsifying-hours-worked/PARAMS/article/43757 Legal sociologists could have a field day here ... I wonder why such things are never studied? Is a sacrifice to the well connected former regulators a de facto bribe? Such questions, if probed, could bring about a more just world, a more equal playing field, less Stalinist governance. All of the things that our preambles tell us to value could be advanced if only sunshine reached into such dark worlds. As a great jurist once wrote: "Publicity is justly commended as a remedy for social and industrial diseases. Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants; electric light the most efficient policeman." Other People's Money—and How Bankers Use It (1914). Ah, but I am certifiable, according to the Indiana authorities, according to the ISC it can be read, for believing such trite things and for advancing such unwanted thoughts. As a great albeit fictional and broken resistance leaders once wrote: "I am the dead." Winston Smith Let us all be dead to the idea of maintaining a patently unjust legal order.

  2. The Department of Education still has over $100 million of ITT Education Services money in the form of $100+ million Letters of Credit. That money was supposed to be used by The DOE to help students. The DOE did nothing to help students. The DOE essentially stole the money from ITT Tech and still has the money. The trustee should be going after the DOE to get the money back for people who are owed that money, including shareholders.

  3. Do you know who the sponsor of the last-minute amendment was?

  4. Law firms of over 50 don't deliver good value, thats what this survey really tells you. Anybody that has seen what they bill for compared to what they deliver knows that already, however.

  5. As one of the many consumers affected by this breach, I found my bank data had been lifted and used to buy over $200 of various merchandise in New York. I did a pretty good job of tracing the purchases to stores around a college campus just from the info on my bank statement. Hm. Mr. Hill, I would like my $200 back! It doesn't belong to the state, in my opinion. Give it back to the consumers affected. I had to freeze my credit and take out data protection, order a new debit card and wait until it arrived. I deserve something for my trouble!

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