malpractice

COA: Causation questions remain in med-mal suit

January 15, 2016
Jennifer Nelson
A woman initially treated for an aggressive form of cancer, only to later discover she was suffering from a far-less serious form of the disease, can proceed with her lawsuit against a doctor she alleges was negligent in catching her cancer early.
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COA: Doctor had duty to nurse practitioner’s patient who died

December 31, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
An Indiana doctor who entered into an agreement with a nurse practitioner to review her prescription practices had a duty to one of the nurse practitioner’s patients, who later died in part because of medicines prescribed to him.
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COA reverses finding attorney entitled to malpractice coverage

October 15, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
A trial court improperly concluded that an Auburn, Indiana, attorney did not make a material representation in his application for renewal of malpractice insurance, the Indiana Court of Appeals held Thursday in reversing summary judgment in favor of the attorney.
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COA: Declaratory judgment wrongly denied in malpractice case

July 8, 2015
Dave Stafford
A trial court wrongly denied a plaintiff’s motion for a declaratory judgment arising from an inability to select a panelist to review a malpractice dispute on behalf of a woman who died after a stroke.
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Court rules litigants are responsible for lawyers ‘asleep on the job’

July 8, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Although the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals agreed the party of investors did have a “poor lawyer,” the panel declined to overturn the nearly $450,000 judgment against them, saying “legal bungling … does not justify reopening a judgment.”
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Journey’s Account Statute does not save woman’s complaint against DOC

May 12, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
A transgendered inmate of the Department of Correction lost before the Court of Appeals in a case seeking personal injury damages from the DOC. The inmate's instant complaint is time-barred and not saved by the Journey's Account Statute, the COA held.
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Attorney did not breach any duty owed to Conour clients

April 22, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
An Indianapolis attorney who spent several years working in a firm with attorney William Conour satisfied his legal duty to clients of Conour based on his lack of knowledge of any specific wrongdoing by Conour related to the clients, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled. Conour is currently in federal prison for stealing from client settlement funds.
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Protecting Your Practice: Importance of informing your malpractice insurer early

March 25, 2015
Dina Cox
Lawyers are humans, too. We make mistakes. Because mistakes happen, we protect ourselves from potential claims and suits by investing in malpractice insurance. But unless you read your policy closely and comply with its provisions, you run the risk of being denied coverage and having to pay the entire cost of an expensive mistake. Here are some tips to help you avoid finding yourself in that predicament.
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Ex-Conseco board member owes legal fees, may pursue malpractice claim

September 19, 2014
Dave Stafford
A pre-bankruptcy board member of Conseco Inc. was ordered to pay $127,592.21 in outstanding legal fees, but he may pursue legal malpractice claims, a federal judge ruled Thursday.
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Valpo attorney charged with $1.6M theft held in contempt in civil suit

February 17, 2014
Dave Stafford
A Porter County lawyer allegedly stole more than $1.6 million from four companies owned by a client he represented for decades, according to criminal charges filed against him.
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Malpractice complaint hobbled by ongoing foot pain

November 27, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
A woman who suffered with a troubled toe for four years got her medical malpractice claim booted by the Indiana Court of Appeals for waiting too long to file the complaint.
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  1. I gave tempparry guardship to a friend of my granddaughter in 2012. I went to prison. I had custody. My daughter went to prison to. We are out. My daughter gave me custody but can get her back. She was not order to give me custody . but now we want granddaughter back from friend. She's 14 now. What rights do we have

  2. This sure is not what most who value good governance consider the Rule of Law to entail: "In a letter dated March 2, which Brizzi forwarded to IBJ, the commission dismissed the grievance “on grounds that there is not reasonable cause to believe that you are guilty of misconduct.”" Yet two month later reasonable cause does exist? (Or is the commission forging ahead, the need for reasonable belief be damned? -- A seeming violation of the Rules of Profession Ethics on the part of the commission) Could the rule of law theory cause one to believe that an explanation is in order? Could it be that Hoosier attorneys live under Imperial Law (which is also a t-word that rhymes with infamy) in which the Platonic guardians can do no wrong and never owe the plebeian class any explanation for their powerful actions. (Might makes it right?) Could this be a case of politics directing the commission, as celebrated IU Mauer Professor (the late) Patrick Baude warned was happening 20 years ago in his controversial (whisteblowing) ethics lecture on a quite similar topic: http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1498&context=ilj

  3. I have a case presently pending cert review before the SCOTUS that reveals just how Indiana regulates the bar. I have been denied licensure for life for holding the wrong views and questioning the grand inquisitors as to their duties as to state and federal constitutional due process. True story: https://www.scribd.com/doc/299040839/2016Petitionforcert-to-SCOTUS Shorter, Amici brief serving to frame issue as misuse of govt licensure: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners

  4. Here's an idea...how about we MORE heavily regulate the law schools to reduce the surplus of graduates, driving starting salaries up for those new grads, so that we can all pay our insane amount of student loans off in a reasonable amount of time and then be able to afford to do pro bono & low-fee work? I've got friends in other industries, radiology for example, and their schools accept a very limited number of students so there will never be a glut of new grads and everyone's pay stays high. For example, my radiologist friend's school accepted just six new students per year.

  5. I totally agree with John Smith.

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