Sentence

Supreme Court remands child molesting case for resentencing

July 21, 2017
Olivia Covington
A man who pleaded guilty to molesting his girlfriend’s son and was sentenced to 40 years in prison will return to court for resentencing. The Indiana Supreme Court determined Friday that the trial court considered an incorrect statutory sentencing range.
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White supremacist gets 65 years for killing black man

July 21, 2017
 Associated Press
A northern Indiana judge has sentenced an avowed white supremacist to 65 years in prison for the fatal stabbing of a man he confessed to committing because the victim was black.
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COA affirms escapee’s convictions, consecutive sentences

July 20, 2017
Olivia Covington
A man who escaped in handcuffs from a police vehicle will remain in prison on escape and drug charges after the Indiana Court of Appeals determined Thursday the trial court did not err in instructing the jury or imposing his sentence.
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High court to consider interpretation of habitual offender statute

July 18, 2017
Olivia Covington
Indiana’s highest court will determine whether a lower court’s interpretation of the habitual offender statute will stand after granting transfer to a case that raises questions of proper statutory interpretation.
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7th Circuit vacates plea, reverses 15-year sentence for illegal possession of a firearm

July 13, 2017
Olivia Covington
An Indiana man’s 15-year sentence for possession of a firearm in violation of the Armed Career Criminal Act has been reversed after the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals determined one of the man’s prior convictions did not constitute a violent felony and, thus, did not qualify him for a sentence above the 10-year statutory maximum.
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Double jeopardy cuts sentence in robbery from 60 to 36 years

July 7, 2017
Dave Stafford
A trial court improperly applied sentencing enhancements to both of a criminal defendant’s robbery and conspiracy convictions, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Friday. The panel found a double-jeopardy violation and reduced the man’s sentence from 60 to 36 years in prison.
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7th Circuit: Indiana burglary is predicate offense under Armed Career Criminal Act

July 6, 2017
Olivia Covington
An Indiana district court judge properly enhanced a man’s sentence following his convictions of being a felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition because the man’s two prior felony convictions of robbery in Indiana qualify as predicate offenses under the Armed Career Criminal Act, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Thursday.
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Man who mailed death threats to federal judges gets 7 years

July 6, 2017
 Associated Press
A man who admitted mailing death threats to three federal judges in Kansas City, Missouri, while imprisoned in Indiana has been sentenced to seven years behind bars without parole.
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Debt-collection exec sentenced to more than 4 years in prison

June 30, 2017
Indianapolis Business Journal
Todd Wolfe, who was indicted on federal fraud charges in 2015 following the collapse of Fishers collection agency Deca Financial Services LLC, has been sentenced to 51 months in prison.
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Justices affirm teen’s 60-year sentence for assault on jogger

June 29, 2017
The Indiana Supreme Court declined to revise a teenager’s sentence for attempting to rape a woman running in Fort Wayne in 2012, finding the 60-year sentence is not inappropriate.
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80-year sentence upheld for man convicted of killing IU student

June 29, 2017
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Court of Appeals declined to revise the 80-year sentence handed down by a Brown County judge for the murder of an Indiana University student two years ago.
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Indiana mother sentenced to 130 years for killing children

June 29, 2017
 Associated Press
A judge has ordered an Indiana woman who admitted to fatally smothering her two children to undergo mental health treatment before going to prison under a 130-year sentence.
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Pharmacy boss blamed for meningitis outbreak gets 9 years

June 27, 2017
 Associated Press
The co-owner of a pharmacy responsible for the deaths of 76 people was sentenced Monday to nine years in prison after he tearfully apologized to victims who described watching their loved ones die or enduring excruciating physical pain from a 2012 nationwide fungal meningitis outbreak caused by contaminated steroids.
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Double sentencing enhancements don’t violate precedent

June 26, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
The Indiana Court of Appeals ruled double enhancements that added 25 years to a man’s sentence did not violate precedent because each was given for a different offense.
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Suspended lawyer in estate misappropriation case receives 8-year sentence

June 22, 2017
 Associated Press
A suspended Indiana attorney has been sentenced to eight years in prison in connection with the alleged misappropriation of funds from six estates totaling more than $700,000.
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Man's 72-year sentence for child molestation upheld

June 21, 2017
Olivia Covington
The Indiana Court of Appeals has affirmed a man’s 72-year sentence for molesting his young daughter, finding the trial court did not consider identical facts at sentencing hearings on two separate charges.
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Fort Wayne TV station seeks to broadcast doctor’s sentencing hearing

June 21, 2017
Jennifer Nelson
A Fort Wayne television station has filed an appeal challenging a Huntington Circuit judge’s order denying its request to air a trial court recording of a doctor’s sentencing hearing for felony sexual battery.
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Court impermissibly entered convictions on 3 resisting law enforcement counts

June 21, 2017
Olivia Covington
An Indiana trial court should not have entered convictions against a man on three counts of resisting law enforcement stemming from a single incident, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled in a Wednesday opinion instructing the trial court to change the man’s convictions and resentence him accordingly.
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Putnam County officer to be resentenced again for excessive use of force

June 20, 2017
Olivia Covington
A Putnam County law enforcement officer who used excessive force against compliant arrestees must return to district court for a second resentencing after the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals determined the district court, once again, failed to adequately justify its imposition of a below-guidelines sentence.
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Indiana woman wins prison release in fatal injection case

June 19, 2017
 Associated Press
A central Indiana woman who admitted giving her chronically ill mother a fatal injection of a painkiller has won release from prison.
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COA: Lack of allocution notice demands resentencing

June 12, 2017
Dave Stafford
A divided Indiana Court of Appeals remanded a man’s sentencing because a judge failed to directly offer him a chance to speak before sentencing him, instead asking the man’s counsel, who said his client did not wish to speak.
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Muncie man gets 80 years in attempted suicide-by-cop shootings

June 6, 2017
 Associated Press
A judge in Muncie has sentenced a 29-year-old man to the maximum 80-year term in prison for firing shots at two law enforcement officers.
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Man's 9-year sentence for possessing a gun upheld by 7th Circuit

June 5, 2017
Olivia Covington
An Indiana’s man sentence for possession of a firearm by a violent felon will stand after the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals held Monday the federal and state definitions of “battery” and “force” work together to convict him of violent felonies.
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Judge gives man convicted in Gary slaying 147-year term

June 5, 2017
 Associated Press
A judge has sentenced a man to 147 years in prison after he was convicted in the drug-related slaying of a man in Gary three years ago.
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3 Ex-Penn St. officials get jail in Sandusky case

June 2, 2017
 Associated Press
A former president of Penn State and two other former university administrators were each sentenced Friday to at least two months in jail for failing to alert authorities to a 2001 allegation against ex-assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, a decision that enabled the now-convicted serial predator to continue molesting boys.
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  1. He TIL team,please zap this comment too since it was merely marking a scammer and not reflecting on the story. Thanks, happy Monday, keep up the fine work.

  2. You just need my social security number sent to your Gmail account to process then loan, right? Beware scammers indeed.

  3. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

  4. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  5. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

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