voter ID

MCBA joins national voter registration effort

September 23, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
As part of a national effort, members of the Marion County Bar Association are going to neighborhoods and churches to help lower-income residents get registered to vote prior to the upcoming November election.
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Teaching students civics lessons

April 11, 2012
Kate Buckley
Indiana programs like mock trial and yVote! educate youth on the courts and government.
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No easy fix for waning voter interestRestricted Content

December 21, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Election results highlight lack of civic engagement in Indiana.
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Justices uphold state's voter ID law

July 7, 2010
Jennifer Nelson
Voters will still need to have valid photo identification to be able to vote in person in Indiana elections.
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Plaintiff loses federal challenges to voter ID law

April 19, 2010
Jennifer Nelson
A federal judge ruled against a Cumberland man in his federal challenge to Indiana's voter identification law, but did remand his pending state claims to a Marion Superior Court for consideration.
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Justice ponders importance of party-line vote

March 5, 2010
Michael Hoskins
As the Indiana Supreme Court justices considered the constitutionality of the state's voter ID law this week, one jurist wondered how much the legislative process might factor into the court's analysis of whether a statute is constitutional.
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Court hears state voter ID case

March 4, 2010
Michael Hoskins
The Indiana Supreme Court on Thursday morning sharply questioned attorneys about the state's five-year-old voter identification law, debating whether the requirements impose an unconstitutional burden on some voters who can't obtain the necessary photo ID.
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High court grants transfer to voter ID case

January 25, 2010
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Supreme Court will decide whether the state's voter identification law violates the Indiana Constitution.
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Federal judge still won't block Voter ID law

October 28, 2009
Michael Hoskins
A week before some Indiana voters go to the polls, a federal judge in Indianapolis has declined to block the state's voter identification law that's currently in flux following a state appellate court ruling in September.
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Attorneys ask justices to consider voter ID case

October 19, 2009
Michael Hoskins
In an expected move, the Indiana Attorney General's Office has asked the state Supreme Court to consider whether the 4-year-old voter identification law is constitutional.
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COA says voter I.D. law unconstitutional

September 17, 2009
Michael Hoskins
The Indiana Court of Appeals has tossed out the state's 4-year-old voter identification law as unconstitutional, bringing new attention to a statute that has been upheld by the nation's highest court.
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Appellate court gets dismissed Voter ID case

March 3, 2009
Michael Hoskins
The Indiana Court of Appeals is being asked to overturn a Marion Superior judge's decision that found the state statute requiring voters to show photo identification before casting a ballot is constitutional.
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Law professor to discuss voter ID research

January 15, 2009
IL Staff
A professor from Indiana University School of Law - Indianapolis will discuss his research and study of the state's photo ID requirement on the rejection rate of voters at a free event this month.
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7th Circuit denies injunction in voter ID suitRestricted Content

November 11, 2008
Michael Hoskins
For those photo-showing voters who cast ballots on Nov. 4, rest assured that the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago isn't going to interfere in the election process already concluded.
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Judge declines to interfere with voter ID law

October 22, 2008
Michael Hoskins
A federal judge in Indianapolis won't interfere with the state law requiring voters to show photo identification at the election polls.
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Voter ID questions remain after SCOTUS ruling

May 14, 2008
Michael Hoskins
The primary election in Indiana has come and gone. Voters had to show photo identification, the same as in other recent elections, but it was the first since the nation's highest court upheld the almost three-year-old state statute requiring specific ID at the polls.
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ACLU wants SCOTUS to hear Indiana voter ID case

May 17, 2007
Michael Hoskins
The Supreme Court of the United States is now being asked to weigh in on Indiana's two-year-old voter identification law.
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  1. I wonder if the USSR had electronic voting machines that changed the ballot after it was cast? Oh well, at least we have a free media serving as vicious watchdog and exposing all of the rot in the system! (Insert rimshot)

  2. Jose, you are assuming those in power do not wish to be totalitarian. My experience has convinced me otherwise. Constitutionalists are nearly as rare as hens teeth among the powerbrokers "managing" us for The Glorious State. Oh, and your point is dead on, el correcta mundo. Keep the Founders’ (1791 & 1851) vision alive, my friend, even if most all others, and especially the ruling junta, chase only power and money (i.e. mammon)

  3. Hypocrisy in high places, absolute immunity handed out like Halloween treats (it is the stuff of which tyranny is made) and the belief that government agents are above the constitutions and cannot be held responsible for mere citizen is killing, perhaps has killed, The Republic. And yet those same power drunk statists just reel on down the hallway toward bureaucratic fascism.

  4. Well, I agree with you that the people need to wake up and see what our judges and politicians have done to our rights and freedoms. This DNA loophole in the statute of limitations is clearly unconstitutional. Why should dna evidence be treated different than video tape evidence for example. So if you commit a crime and they catch you on tape or if you confess or leave prints behind: they only have five years to bring their case. However, if dna identifies someone they can still bring a case even fifty-years later. where is the common sense and reason. Members of congress are corrupt fools. They should all be kicked out of office and replaced by people who respect the constitution.

  5. If the AG could pick and choose which state statutes he defended from Constitutional challenge, wouldn't that make him more powerful than the Guv and General Assembly? In other words, the AG should have no choice in defending laws. He should defend all of them. If its a bad law, blame the General Assembly who presumably passed it with a majority (not the government lawyer). Also, why has there been no write up on the actual legislators who passed the law defining marriage? For all the fuss Democrats have made, it would be interesting to know if some Democrats voted in favor of it (or if some Republican's voted against it). Have a nice day.

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