Courts

Judges affirm 95-year sentence for molesting boy

September 30, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
Although the trial court erred in admitting most of the pornographic images possessed by the defendant at his child molestation trial, the admission was a harmless error. As such, the Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed William Remy’s 95-year sentence for five charges related to repeated molestation of a boy.
More

COA: Out-of-state attorneys demonstrated good cause for pro hac vice admission

September 30, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
A Lake County judge misinterpreted a local rule when he determined that five attorneys seeking pro hac vice admission in a contract dispute did not overcome a presumption that attorneys not licensed in Indiana are not permitted to practice before the court. The Court of Appeals ordered the admission of the attorneys.
More

COA reverses foreclosure because bank can’t prove it holds the note

September 29, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Court of Appeals has reversed the foreclosure of an Elkhart man’s home, holding the bank that sought the foreclosure did not establish it was entitled to enforce the promissory note as its holder.
More

7th Circuit rebukes counsel involved in attempt to collect debt

September 29, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals had harsh words for counsel on both sides of a lawsuit involving an unpaid educational debt, finding the attorneys have demonstrated “appalling judgment” in this case.
More

Taft partner appointed to Bankruptcy Court

September 29, 2014
IL Staff
Jeffrey J. Graham, a partner at Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP in Indianapolis, is the newest Bankruptcy judge in the Southern District of Indiana. The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals announced his appointment Monday.
More

Justices take 4th Amendment case

September 29, 2014
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court will decide a case that divided the Indiana Court of Appeals over whether marijuana and a pipe found after a traffic stop should be suppressed.
More

Former workers file suit against state lawmaker

September 29, 2014
 Associated Press
A lawmaker who was one of nine Republican state senators to vote against a right-to-work law two years ago is accused in a lawsuit of failing to pay his employees more than $220,000 in wages and other benefits.
More

Dispute over unpaid sewer fees could head to court

September 29, 2014
 Associated Press
Dozens of residents in southern Indiana could face legal action for failing to pay to tie in to sewer lines in a newly annexed area.
More

Attorney asks judge to reverse life with no parole

September 29, 2014
 Associated Press
An attorney for a southwestern Indiana man found guilty of fatally shooting his ex-girlfriend's father is asking a judge to reverse the most serious conviction against him.
More

JQC issues advisory opinion to judges with family members running for office

September 26, 2014
IL Staff
Judges who have a family member running for elected office may appear in campaign materials as long as the judge’s title or position isn’t mentioned, the Indiana Commission on Judicial Qualifications decided in an advisory opinion released Friday.
More

Woman’s suit against hospital for disparaging comments revived by COA

September 26, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
A trial court erred when it dismissed a woman’s intentional infliction of emotional distress claim filed against Community Hospital after she says staff made derogatory comments regarding her situation after she was brought in unconscious and under the influence of a date rape drug.
More

Court: Father’s failure to timely register implies consent to adoption

September 26, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Court of Appeals has affirmed the adoption of a child by the maternal grandfather after finding the purported father irrevocably implied consent after failing to timely register with the Indiana Putative Father Registry.
More

COA: Letter satisfied notice requirements after city damages pipeline

September 26, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Court of Appeals has affirmed the denial of the city of Plymouth’s motion to dismiss an administrative action against it stemming from damages it caused to an underground natural gas pipeline. The appeals court found the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission satisfied the statutory and administrative requirements concerning notice of the violation and recommended penalties.
More

Access counselor doubts city's need for secrecy on justice center RFP

September 26, 2014
Kathleen McLaughlin
Indiana Public Access Counselor Luke Britt told the city of Indianapolis that he wasn't swayed by its reasons for withholding its request for proposals for a new $500 million criminal justice complex.
More

COA orders trial over whether trucking company must pay for highway damage

September 25, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
The crash report prepared after a fatal trucking accident on Interstate 70 that resulted in damage to the highway should not have been included as evidence in the state’s lawsuit seeking recovery of the money it spent repairing the highway, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Thursday. As a result, the judges reversed summary judgment in favor of the state and ordered the matter proceed to trial.
More

Justices affirm adoption despite father’s untimely appeal

September 25, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Supreme Court in its decision affirming the adoption of a girl first tackled the issue of appellate jurisdiction to entertain the biological father’s appeal.
More

1,291-day delay in holding trial requires reversing conviction

September 25, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
The “unduly long delay” in bringing a man to trial on a charge of child molesting – 1,291 days – violated his constitutional right to a speedy trial and requires reversing his conviction, the Indiana Supreme Court ruled Wednesday.
More

Child services investigators claim unpaid overtime

September 25, 2014
 Associated Press
Two Indiana Department of Child Services investigators say in a lawsuit that they've had to work extensive overtime without receiving required overtime pay.
More

Second suit filed over Wal-Mart PCB contamination

September 25, 2014
IL Staff
A second lawsuit has been filed as a result of toxic contamination discovered at an Indianapolis Wal-Mart return center.
More

Former sheriff’s deputies lose suit challenging promotion process

September 24, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
Because the phrase “shall endeavor” should be read to mean one shall try, the Indiana Court of Appeals rejected two Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department officers' arguments that they should have been promoted to captain. The two claimed because they were former sheriff’s deputies, the consolidation of the sheriff’s and city police departments in 2006 required their promotions to maintain proportional representation.
More

Bankruptcy Court to hold ceremony for retiring judge

September 24, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
The United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Indiana is hosting a private retirement ceremony Thursday in honor of Judge James K. Coachys, who is retiring Sept. 30.
More

State's way of paying public defenders debated

September 24, 2014
 Associated Press
The state pays the salaries of its judges and prosecutors, but public defenders are paid by counties that are only partially reimbursed for their costs — an approach that some including the executive director of the Indiana Public Defender Council want to see changed.
More

The traditional suit still rules when in court

September 24, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
The decision by one Indiana attorney to not wear socks in the courtroom has sparked a discussion among lawyers about professional dress codes. Shined shoes, closed-toe pumps, crisp shirts and blouses, pants, skirts and jackets are the closet staples of lawyers. While the business world has gone casual, pitching the tie and welcoming sandals in some cases, the legal profession has largely remained true to conservative business attire.
More

Line blurs on intoxication

September 24, 2014
Dave Stafford
Convictions for public intoxication don’t just require being pickled in public anymore. An inebriated person now has to do something else, but conduct elements added to the criminal statute in 2012 have blurred what constitutes a misdemeanor.
More

Representation is imperative to due process for immigrants

September 24, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
The cases involving immigrant children coming to the U.S. from Central America are creating more need for pro bono legal representation and are highlighting an area of asylum law that the courts struggle to clearly define.
More
Page  << 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 >> pager
Sponsored by

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Indiana State Bar Association

Indianapolis Bar Association

Evansville Bar Association

Allen County Bar Association

Indiana Lawyer on Facebook

facebook
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. Did someone not tell people who have access to the Chevy Volts that it has a gas engine and will run just like a normal car? The batteries give the Volt approximately a 40 mile range, but after that the gas engine will propel the vehicle either directly through the transmission like any other car, or gas engine recharges the batteries depending on the conditions.

  2. Catholic, Lutheran, even the Baptists nuzzling the wolf! http://www.judicialwatch.org/press-room/press-releases/judicial-watch-documents-reveal-obama-hhs-paid-baptist-children-family-services-182129786-four-months-housing-illegal-alien-children/ YET where is the Progressivist outcry? Silent. I wonder why?

  3. Thank you, Honorable Ladies, and thank you, TIL, for this interesting interview. The most interesting question was the last one, which drew the least response. Could it be that NFP stamps are a threat to the very foundation of our common law American legal tradition, a throwback to the continental system that facilitated differing standards of justice? A throwback to Star Chamber’s protection of the landed gentry? If TIL ever again interviews this same panel, I would recommend inviting one known for voicing socio-legal dissent for the masses, maybe Welch, maybe Ogden, maybe our own John Smith? As demographics shift and our social cohesion precipitously drops, a consistent judicial core will become more and more important so that Justice and Equal Protection and Due Process are yet guiding stars. If those stars fall from our collective social horizon (and can they be seen even now through the haze of NFP opinions?) then what glue other than more NFP decisions and TRO’s and executive orders -- all backed by more and more lethally armed praetorians – will prop up our government institutions? And if and when we do arrive at such an end … will any then dare call that tyranny? Or will the cost of such dissent be too high to justify?

  4. This is easily remedied, and in a fashion that every church sacrificing incense for its 501c3 status and/or graveling for government grants should have no problem with ..... just add this statue, http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Capitoline_she-wolf_Musei_Capitolini_MC1181.jpg entitled, "Jesus and Cousin John learn to suckle sustenance from the beloved Nanny State." Heckfire, the ACLU might even help move the statue in place then. And the art will certainly reflect our modern life, given the clergy's full-bellied willingness to accede to every whim of the new caesars. If any balk, just threaten to take away their government milk … they will quiet down straightaway, I assure you. Few, if any of them, are willing to cross the ruling elite as did the real J&J

  5. Tina has left the building.

ADVERTISEMENT