Government

Records show congressman's wife works part time in $240K job

June 21, 2017
 Associated Press
The wife of a likely Senate candidate averages a 26.5-hour work week in her $240,000-a-year job doing legal consulting for an Indianapolis suburb, according to timesheets reviewed by The Associated Press.
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Indianapolis to receive Justice Department aid to fight crime

June 20, 2017
 Associated Press
The Justice Department says it will offer its resources to help 12 U.S. cities, including Indianapolis, fight violent crime.
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Indiana to pay firm $100k to handle Pence email requests

June 19, 2017
 Associated Press
Indiana is paying a law firm $100,000 to help deal with a backlog of public records requests, most of which seek emails from Vice President Mike Pence's tenure as governor, including correspondence routed through a private AOL.com account he used to conduct state business.
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Indianapolis seeks submissions for criminal justice center services

June 16, 2017
Hayleigh Colombo, Indianapolis Business Journal
The Indianapolis Bond Bank is looking for firms interested in working on the city’s new criminal justice center — from providing civil engineering services to mechanical, electrical and plumbing work.
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Pence hires veteran Washington lawyer to handle Russia probe

June 16, 2017
 Bloomberg News
Vice President Mike Pence has hired an outside legal counsel with deep experience in Washington, D.C., to assist with investigations into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.
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Drug makers being probed by states over opioid marketing

June 15, 2017
 Bloomberg News, IL Staff
State attorneys general from across the U.S., including Indiana, have started a joint investigation into whether drug manufacturers are illegally marketing and selling opioids, a critical question as the country faces an epidemic leading to tens of thousands of overdose deaths each year.
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Indianapolis hires first director of re-entry

June 15, 2017
IL Staff
An administrator with the Marion County Public Defender Agency has been named the first director of re-entry for the city of Indianapolis’ Office of Health and Public Safety.
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Health chief, 4 others charged with manslaughter in Flint

June 14, 2017
 Associated Press
Five people, including the head of Michigan's health department, were charged Wednesday with involuntary manslaughter in an investigation of Flint's lead-contaminated water, all blamed in the death of an 85-year-old man who had Legionnaires' disease.
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Minimum-security prison in Indianapolis to close this summer

June 14, 2017
 Associated Press
State officials say a minimum-security prison that's operated in Indianapolis for nearly 150 years will close its doors this summer.
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State’s $25 million payout in DCS abuses case is the largest ever of its kind

June 14, 2017
Dave Stafford
The Indiana attorney general and Department of Child Services’ decision to settle a lawsuit brought by a wrongly prosecuted family yielded the largest payment of its type in state history.
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Trump administration calls for overhaul of Wall Street rules

June 13, 2017
 Bloomberg News
The Trump administration laid out its highly anticipated plan for overhauling bank rules, calling on the government to ease, though not eliminate, many of the strictures that were imposed on Wall Street after the financial crisis.
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McKinney grad named to rural affairs USDA post

June 13, 2017
 Associated Press
An Indiana native and graduate of Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law has been named to a U.S. Department of Agriculture post overseeing rural issues. U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue announced Monday that Anne Hazlett will lead the USDA's rural development agencies.
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9th Circuit upholds block on Trump's travel ban

June 12, 2017
 Associated Press
Another U.S. appeals court upheld a decision blocking President Donald Trump's revised travel ban Monday, dealing the administration another legal defeat as the U.S. Supreme Court considers a separate case on the issue.
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Ex-Indianapolis officer convicted in fatal crash released from prison

June 12, 2017
 Associated Press
A former Indianapolis police officer convicted of killing one motorcyclist and seriously injuring two others while driving drunk in his police cruiser was released from prison Sunday after serving about four years of his 16-year sentence.
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Trump's legal team to file complaint on Comey

June 9, 2017
 Associated Press
President Donald Trump's personal attorney is planning to file a complaint against former FBI Director James Comey for details he revealed during his congressional testimony.
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No bond for woman accused of leaking top-secret documents

June 9, 2017
 Associated Press
A federal judge in Augusta, Georgia, ordered a young woman charged with leaking classified U.S. documents to remain jailed until her trial after prosecutors argued she might possess more stolen government secrets.
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Comey's release of Trump memo to newspaper: Was it legal?

June 9, 2017
 Associated Press
When former FBI Director James Comey revealed Thursday that he orchestrated a disclosure of damaging details about his conversations with President Donald Trump, he demonstrated his savvy use of media and his skills as a Washington operator. He also kicked up a hornet's nest of questions about the legal and ethical implications of the move.
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Trump lawyer denies president demanded loyalty

June 8, 2017
 Associated Press
President Donald Trump's personal attorney says the president "never, in form or substance" directed former FBI director James Comey to stop investigating anyone. That includes former national security adviser, Michael Flynn.
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US House poised to roll back post-2008 financial rules

June 8, 2017
 Associated Press
President Donald Trump has said he wants to do "a big number" on the Obama-era financial rules devised after the Great Recession, and House Republicans were poised to fulfill that goal Thursday.
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7th Circuit: Retired veteran can’t sue government for distress

June 8, 2017
Olivia Covington
A retired veteran who was wrongfully deprived of incapacitation payments during his time in the reserves cannot sue the U.S. government for distress caused by that deprivation because existing caselaw prohibits servicemembers from suing the government for injuries accrued while in the military, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Thursday.
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Labor secretary defends merging anti-discrimination agencies

June 7, 2017
 Associated Press
Cutting and merging two agencies that investigate workplace discrimination won't reduce the government's enforcement power, Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta said Wednesday. But Democrats pointed to what they say is President Donald Trump's broader effort to roll back decades of civil rights protections.
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New Trump FBI pick represented Christie in Bridgegate case

June 7, 2017
 Associated Press
Christopher Wray, a white-collar defense lawyer with a strong law enforcement background who represented New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in the Bridgegate scandal, was announced Wednesday as President Donald Trump's pick to head the FBI.
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US contractor arrested after leak of Russia hacking report

June 6, 2017
 Associated Press
A federal contractor has been arrested following the leak of a classified intelligence report that suggests Russian hackers attacked at least one U.S. voting software supplier days before last year's presidential election.
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Prosecutors hail new DNA, anti-drug laws

June 2, 2017
Indiana prosecutors joined Gov. Eric Holcomb Thursday as he signed two bills prosecutors said are essential to law enforcement’s ability to build criminal cases.
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COA: Indiana death penalty protocol ‘void’

June 1, 2017
Dave Stafford
Indiana’s means of carrying out the death penalty through lethal injection “is void and without effect,” the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Thursday, reversing a death row inmate’s challenge to the Indiana Department of Correction’s execution protocol.
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  1. He TIL team,please zap this comment too since it was merely marking a scammer and not reflecting on the story. Thanks, happy Monday, keep up the fine work.

  2. You just need my social security number sent to your Gmail account to process then loan, right? Beware scammers indeed.

  3. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

  4. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  5. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

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