Government

Book recounts '08 presidential race

September 1, 2010
IL Staff
An Indiana lawyer intimately involved in Barack Obama’s presidential run has written a book about the campaign and how the consistently Republican state went Democrat for the first time since 1964.
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'Social business' among discussions

September 1, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
This year’s Program on Law and State Government at Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis Oct. 1 will focus on three main topics for lawyers, businesses, legislators, government employees, and academics: education about entrepreneurship at the undergrad, graduate school, and law school levels; the idea of “social businesses,” also known as L3Cs or low profit limited liability companies; and how government entities use data to improve services to citizens.
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Justice: Fee hike could mean statewide case management system by 2017

August 26, 2010
Michael Hoskins
If lawmakers during the next legislative session increase a statewide court fee an extra $3, Indiana Supreme Court Justice Frank Sullivan believes the state can fully implement a case management system in all county courts by June 30, 2017.
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20 years of rights under the ADA

August 18, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
While many people might take it for granted that accessibility for all people is now commonplace and that it is illegal to discriminate against an employee based on a disability, the Americans with Disabilities Act was signed only 20 years ago.
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Attorneys general at the state fair

August 18, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
While some things are new this year at the Indiana State Fair, one that most fairgoers will likely not even notice is the recently enhanced partnership between the state attorney general’s office and the state fair.
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Indiana tunes in to national issues in federal courts

August 18, 2010
Michael Hoskins
What happens in Indiana regarding illegal immigration, same-sex marriage, and health-care reform may hinge on what happens with litigation playing out in the nation’s appellate courts.
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Class action suit challenges voter-removal statute

August 17, 2010
Michael Hoskins
State officials are prohibiting people convicted and incarcerated for misdemeanor offenses from voting while they are behind bars, but that could change if a federal suit is successful.
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Commission sends finalists letter to governor

August 6, 2010
Michael Hoskins
A 60-day clock has started for Gov. Mitch Daniels to choose the next Indiana Supreme Court justice, after three names were officially sent to him Thursday afternoon.
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Appellate rulings can create confusion for attorneys, trial judges

August 4, 2010
Michael Hoskins
Clear and concise court rulings are what judges hope can be produced, so that lawyers and lower courts can have guidance on how to address a particular legal issue. But that doesn’t always happen.
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Court upholds discrimination claims in coroner's office

July 27, 2010
Jennifer Nelson
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the finding that an African-American Marion County Coroner took action against his white chief deputy coroner because of race, but ordered a reduction in the amount of compensatory damages the deputy coroner could receive.
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Federal office: No Hatch Act violations in Dearborn County

July 27, 2010
Michael Hoskins
A federal government office has cleared two Dearborn County officials who’d been accused by the former county attorney of violating federal law that restricts political activity for those involved with federally funded programs.
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No issue with all legislative logrolling

July 21, 2010
Michael Hoskins
The Indiana Supreme Court offered some clues recently about why it’s ignored repeated attempts to address the issue of legislative logrolling, where multiple unrelated changes are stuffed into one massive bill that becomes law.
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State changes victim alerts

July 21, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
The Indiana Department of Correction recently changed how it will notify those who register to find out where someone is in the system, whether it’s a transfer from one jail to another, a change in status, or a legal hearing.
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Lawyer elected U.S. Libertarian Party officer

July 21, 2010
Peter Schnitzler
Mark Rutherford wants America’s third-largest political party to make inroads by showing competence at the grassroots level of government.
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Justices consider juvenile placements

July 21, 2010
Michael Hoskins
The Indiana Supreme Court is considering a case where a St. Joseph County juvenile judge has declared unconstitutional three statutes involving child placements, a controversial issue that’s pitted many within the state judiciary against the Indiana Department of Child Services for the past two years.
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Prosecutor candidate drops out of race

July 16, 2010
Jennifer Nelson
The Democratic candidate for Gibson County Prosecutor has withdrawn from the race following his indictment on four charges, including possession of child pornography.
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Could Indiana adopt a law like Arizona's?

July 7, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
Immigration attorneys and victims advocates are reading up on the Arizona illegal immigrant law and bracing themselves for what a similar bill in Indiana could mean for their clients.
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Judicial pay case gets ABA support

July 7, 2010
Michael Hoskins
The American Bar Association wants the Supreme Court of the United States to take a case that asks whether congressional denial of cost-of-living adjustments for federal judges compromises judicial independence and violates the Constitution.
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Partnership targets Indiana's corrections system

June 28, 2010
Elizabeth Brockett
To address Indiana’s growing prison population and increasing related costs, the state is partnering with The Pew Center on the States and the Council of State Governments Justice Center for the first comprehensive review of the state’s criminal code and sentencing policies since 1976.
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Robo-calls at issue in Indiana courts

June 23, 2010
Michael Hoskins
A line of litigation has been playing out in state and federal courts involving what is and isn't allowed under the Automatic Dialing Machines Statute.
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Idea for green tech patents gets mixed reviews

June 23, 2010
Michael Hoskins
A federal plan to boost green technology innovation by dramatically cutting the patent processing time is drawing mixed reaction from intellectual property attorneys in Indiana as they wonder whether the pilot program will help or hurt their clients.
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Judge Magnus-Stinson takes oath

June 15, 2010
IL Staff
The newest judge for the Southern District of Indiana was sworn in Monday to officially become a U.S. District Judge.
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Criminal tax evasion offers legal option in targeting dog, puppy mills

June 9, 2010
Michael Hoskins
A July 2009 law put more strength behind local prosecutors and state regulators who can now more diligently pursue illegal animal activity of puppy mills who don't pay taxes.
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County official wants review of new ethics leader

June 9, 2010
Michael Hoskins
A Dearborn County commissioner alleges the county’s former attorney has wrongly accused two officials of violating federal law and has asked the Indiana Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission to launch an investigation of its soon-to-be leader who starts in that office June 21.
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Court excited about magistrate's elevation

June 8, 2010
Michael Hoskins
Within a week, the state's third federal female judge could be ready to handle her constitutionally created duties in the Southern District of Indiana.
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  1. It's a big fat black mark against the US that they radicalized a lot of these Afghan jihadis in the 80s to fight the soviets and then when they predictably got around to biting the hand that fed them, the US had to invade their homelands, install a bunch of corrupt drug kingpins and kleptocrats, take these guys and torture the hell out of them. Why for example did the US have to sodomize them? Dubya said "they hate us for our freedoms!" Here, try some of that freedom whether you like it or not!!! Now they got even more reasons to hate us-- lets just keep bombing the crap out of their populations, installing more puppet regimes, arming one faction against another, etc etc etc.... the US is becoming a monster. No wonder they hate us. Here's my modest recommendation. How about we follow "Just War" theory in the future. St Augustine had it right. How about we treat these obvious prisoners of war according to the Geneva convention instead of torturing them in sadistic and perverted ways.

  2. As usual, John is "spot-on." The subtle but poignant points he makes are numerous and warrant reflection by mediators and users. Oh but were it so simple.

  3. ACLU. Way to step up against the police state. I see a lot of things from the ACLU I don't like but this one is a gold star in its column.... instead of fighting it the authorities should apologize and back off.

  4. Duncan, It's called the RIGHT OF ASSOCIATION and in the old days people believed it did apply to contracts and employment. Then along came title vii.....that aside, I believe that I am free to work or not work for whomever I like regardless: I don't need a law to tell me I'm free. The day I really am compelled to ignore all the facts of social reality in my associations and I blithely go along with it, I'll be a slave of the state. That day is not today......... in the meantime this proposed bill would probably be violative of 18 usc sec 1981 that prohibits discrimination in contracts... a law violated regularly because who could ever really expect to enforce it along the millions of contracts made in the marketplace daily? Some of these so-called civil rights laws are unenforceable and unjust Utopian Social Engineering. Forcing people to love each other will never work.

  5. I am the father of a sweet little one-year-old named girl, who happens to have Down Syndrome. To anyone who reads this who may be considering the decision to terminate, please know that your child will absolutely light up your life as my daughter has the lives of everyone around her. There is no part of me that condones abortion of a child on the basis that he/she has or might have Down Syndrome. From an intellectual standpoint, however, I question the enforceability of this potential law. As it stands now, the bill reads in relevant part as follows: "A person may not intentionally perform or attempt to perform an abortion . . . if the person knows that the pregnant woman is seeking the abortion solely because the fetus has been diagnosed with Down syndrome or a potential diagnosis of Down syndrome." It includes similarly worded provisions abortion on "any other disability" or based on sex selection. It goes so far as to make the medical provider at least potentially liable for wrongful death. First, how does a medical provider "know" that "the pregnant woman is seeking the abortion SOLELY" because of anything? What if the woman says she just doesn't want the baby - not because of the diagnosis - she just doesn't want him/her? Further, how can the doctor be liable for wrongful death, when a Child Wrongful Death claim belongs to the parents? Is there any circumstance in which the mother's comparative fault will not exceed the doctor's alleged comparative fault, thereby barring the claim? If the State wants to discourage women from aborting their children because of a Down Syndrome diagnosis, I'm all for that. Purporting to ban it with an unenforceable law, however, is not the way to effectuate this policy.

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