Features

25-year-old Evansville courtesy code reminds lawyers how to behave

March 25, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
The Evansville Bar Association’s Professional Courtesy Code started with attorney Edward Johnson sitting at his desk and putting on paper the way attorneys should behave when practicing law.
More

NDLS hosting symposium on life, death and disease

March 17, 2015
IL Staff
An upcoming Notre Dame Law School symposium on regulating life, disease and death will feature a keynote speaker discussing legal preparedness for Ebola.
More

Plaque and lecture series established to honor Randall Shepard

March 13, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Almost three years after an effort to honor retired Indiana Chief Justice Randall Shepard was launched, the project has taken a new direction that some applaud as better than the initial idea.
More

Rucker to be honored at April event in Gary

March 12, 2015
IL Staff
Indiana Supreme Court Justice Robert Rucker will receive the Merit of Distinction Award at the 3rd annual Katie Hall Public Service Awards Luncheon on April 4 in Gary.
More

Lawyers to lead annual March Against Hunger

February 17, 2015
IL Staff
The Indiana State Bar Association and the office of Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller will join with Feeding Indiana’s Hungry on Wednesday to kick off a monthlong effort to raise money and nonperishable donations for the state’s regional food banks.
More

Homeless Project enables attorneys to offer advice and guidance to shelter residents

February 11, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Residents in homeless shelters in Indianapolis are receiving legal advice and guidance through the Homeless Shelter Project. The program, now administered by the Indianapolis Bar Association, sends pairs of attorneys to a handful of shelters around the city every three weeks to meet with residents needing help.
More

Hammerle makes his 2015 Oscar picks

February 11, 2015
Robert Hammerle
Let me again venture out on a limb and make my Academy Awards picks. Of course, I will likely be wrong, but never in my cinematic heart.
More

Judge counts his blessings while slowly going blind

February 9, 2015
 Associated Press
George Pancol, judge of Madison Circuit Court 2, is going blind. The doctors can't agree why.
More

Second Harper Lee novel to be published in July

February 4, 2015
 Associated Press
Fans and followers of Atticus Finch rejoice. "To Kill a Mockingbird" will not be Harper Lee's only published book after all.
More

Mock trial volunteers needed

January 26, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana attorneys are being offered the opportunity to show off their judicial skills. The Indiana Bar Foundation is seeking lawyers to volunteer as judges during the 2015 Indiana High School Mock Trial Competition.
More

Explosion case cemented Richmond attorney's reputation

January 26, 2015
 Associated Press
Kent Klinge learned the basics of law in school. But it was in a Connersville courtroom where he became a lawyer. Klinge, who was one of the top trial lawyers in Richmond for more than 25 years in the 1970s, '80s and '90s, retired from practice as a partner at Boston Bever Klinge Cross & Chidester in Richmond on Jan. 1 after a 47-year career.
More

Chicago law professor to give Valpo’s MLK lecture

January 19, 2015
IL Staff
A DePaul University College of Law professor, well-known as a scholar in the areas of employment and labor law and voting rights, will be the featured speaker at Valparaiso University Law School’s Martin Luther King Jr. Lecture Thursday.
More

ILAS annual fundraising campaign nearing goal

January 19, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
The Indianapolis Legal Aid Society is making a final push in its 2014 holiday dollar campaign, hoping to entice late donors and surpass the record amount donated during the 2013 effort.
More

Lawyers sought for Lung Association stair climb benefit

January 19, 2015
Dave Stafford
The central Indiana legal community hopes to reach new fundraising heights in the fifth annual American Lung Association’s Fight for Air Climb Law Firm Challenge.
More

Author and death penalty opponent Sister Helen Prejean calls for judicial reform

January 14, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
When she became pen pals with an inmate on Louisiana’s death row, Sister Helen Prejean said she did not know much about the law or the U.S. Constitution. She was not aware of constitutional protections or how the Supreme Court of the United States was interpreting them.
More

CNBC’s ‘American Greed’ puts focus on Conour as appeal proceeds

January 9, 2015
Dave Stafford
The CNBC program “American Greed,” which bills itself as a “shocking true crime series (that) examines the dark side of the American Dream,” has taped an episode profiling former Indianapolis lawyer and convicted fraudster William Conour.
More

Judy Stanton stepping down as leader of NWI Volunteer Lawyers Inc.

December 31, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Judy Stanton was not immediately attracted to the law. She graduated from college and started a family. But an article she read in the mid-1970s in her alumni magazine about lawyers sparked her interest in the law. She's since spent more than 30 years helping the underserved.
More

Fewer young attorneys enter graying profession, instead find alternative uses for JDs

December 3, 2014
Dave Stafford
Recent Indiana law school graduates are broadening their horizons, with many taking nontraditional post-graduate paths in the business world as the legal profession is increasingly graying.
More

Hammerle on ... 'Whiplash,' 'The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1'

December 3, 2014
Robert Hammerle
Bob Hammerle says "Whiplash" is a startling movie with an Oscar-worthy screenplay that assaults your senses.
More

Indianapolis attorney turns pastime into an album of children’s music

November 19, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Dave Heger, an in-house counsel for AES Corp., is a musician in his off-hours, playing guitar and making up songs for his two children. He turned those snippets of melodies into songs and turned those songs into an album.
More

Hammerle On…'Big Hero 6,' 'Interstellar,' and 'St. Vincent'

November 19, 2014
Robert Hammerle
Bob Hammerle says he needs to see "Interstellar" again to try to grasp the moments that he didn't understand from the movie.
More

Evansville Bar Association honors veterans

November 11, 2014
IL Staff
The Evansville Bar Association is hosting its 4th annual Veterans Day Celebration Tuesday to honor the men and women of the bar association who have served in the United States Armed Forces.
More

Attorney: reasoned discourse needed in Internet age

November 5, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Wabash College grad David Kendall returns to alma mater as the keynote speaker at the school's Public Discourse Summit.
More

Hammerle On ... 'Fury,' 'Pride'

November 5, 2014
Robert Hammerle
Bob Hammerle says "Pride" can't be missed. Be prepared to both laugh and cry.
More

Lawyer’s book retraces Indy’s infamous Sylvia Likens murder case

October 22, 2014
Dave Stafford
Almost 50 years later, Forrest Bowman Jr. is talking about the murder case involving Indianapolis teen Sylvia Likens, something he’s not done much of in the past. His just-released book, “Sylvia: The Likens Trial,” presents a thorough, inside, day-by-day recollection of a trial that captivated and horrified the state in 1966.
More
Page  << 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 >> pager
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. California Sex Offender Management Board (CASOMB) End of Year Report 2014. (page 13) Under the current system many local registering agencies are challenged just keeping up with registration paperwork. It takes an hour or more to process each registrant, the majority of whom are low risk offenders. As a result law enforcement cannot monitor higher risk offenders more intensively in the community due to the sheer numbers on the registry. Some of the consequences of lengthy and unnecessary registration requirements actually destabilize the life’s of registrants and those -such as families- whose lives are often substantially impacted. Such consequences are thought to raise levels of known risk factors while providing no discernible benefit in terms of community safety. The full report is available online at. http://www.casomb.org/index.cfm?pid=231 National Institute of Justice (NIJ) US Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs United States of America. The overall conclusion is that Megan’s law has had no demonstrated effect on sexual offenses in New Jersey, calling into question the justification for start-up and operational costs. Megan’s Law has had no effect on time to first rearrest for known sex offenders and has not reduced sexual reoffending. Neither has it had an impact on the type of sexual reoffense or first-time sexual offense. The study also found that the law had not reduced the number of victims of sexual offenses. The full report is available online at. https://www.ncjrs.gov/app/publications/abstract.aspx? ID=247350 The University of Chicago Press for The Booth School of Business of the University of Chicago and The University of Chicago Law School Article DOI: 10.1086/658483 Conclusion. The data in these three data sets do not strongly support the effectiveness of sex offender registries. The national panel data do not show a significant decrease in the rate of rape or the arrest rate for sexual abuse after implementation of a registry via the Internet. The BJS data that tracked individual sex offenders after their release in 1994 did not show that registration had a significantly negative effect on recidivism. And the D.C. crime data do not show that knowing the location of sex offenders by census block can help protect the locations of sexual abuse. This pattern of noneffectiveness across the data sets does not support the conclusion that sex offender registries are successful in meeting their objectives of increasing public safety and lowering recidivism rates. The full report is available online at. http://www.jstor.org/stable/full/10.1086/658483 These are not isolated conclusions but are the same outcomes in the majority of conclusions and reports on this subject from multiple government agencies and throughout the academic community. People, including the media and other organizations should not rely on and reiterate the statements and opinions of the legislators or other people as to the need for these laws because of the high recidivism rates and the high risk offenders pose to the public which simply is not true and is pure hyperbole and fiction. They should rely on facts and data collected and submitted in reports from the leading authorities and credible experts in the fields such as the following. California Sex Offender Management Board (CASOMB) Sex offender recidivism rate for a new sex offense is 0.8% (page 30) The full report is available online at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Adult_Research_Branch/Research_Documents/2014_Outcome_Evaluation_Report_7-6-2015.pdf California Sex Offender Management Board (CASOMB) (page 38) Sex offender recidivism rate for a new sex offense is 1.8% The full report is available online at. http://www.google.com/url?sa= t&source=web&cd=1&ved= 0CCEQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F% 2Fwww.cdcr.ca.gov%2FAdult_ Research_Branch%2FResearch_ documents%2FOutcome_ evaluation_Report_2013.pdf&ei= C9dSVePNF8HfoATX-IBo&usg=AFQjCNE9I6ueHz-o2mZUnuxLPTyiRdjDsQ Bureau of Justice Statistics 5 PERCENT OF SEX OFFENDERS REARRESTED FOR ANOTHER SEX CRIME WITHIN 3 YEARS OF PRISON RELEASE WASHINGTON, D.C. Within 3 years following their 1994 state prison release, 5.3 percent of sex offenders (men who had committed rape or sexual assault) were rearrested for another sex crime, the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) announced today. The full report is available online at. http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/press/rsorp94pr.cfm Document title; A Model of Static and Dynamic Sex Offender Risk Assessment Author: Robert J. McGrath, Michael P. Lasher, Georgia F. Cumming Document No.: 236217 Date Received: October 2011 Award Number: 2008-DD-BX-0013 Findings: Study of 759 adult male offenders under community supervision Re-arrest rate: 4.6% after 3-year follow-up The sexual re-offense rates for the 746 released in 2005 are much lower than what many in the public have been led to expect or believe. These low re-offense rates appear to contradict a conventional wisdom that sex offenders have very high sexual re-offense rates. The full report is available online at. https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/236217.pdf Document Title: SEX OFFENDER SENTENCING IN WASHINGTON STATE: RECIDIVISM RATES BY: Washington State Institute For Public Policy. A study of 4,091 sex offenders either released from prison or community supervision form 1994 to 1998 and examined for 5 years Findings: Sex Crime Recidivism Rate: 2.7% Link to Report: http://www.oncefallen.com/files/Washington_SO_Recid_2005.pdf Document Title: Indiana’s Recidivism Rates Decline for Third Consecutive Year BY: Indiana Department of Correction 2009. The recidivism rate for sex offenders returning on a new sex offense was 1.05%, one of the lowest in the nation. In a time when sex offenders continue to face additional post-release requirements that often result in their return to prison for violating technical rules such as registration and residency restrictions, the instances of sex offenders returning to prison due to the commitment of a new sex crime is extremely low. Findings: sex offenders returning on a new sex offense was 1.05% Link to Report: http://www.in.gov/idoc/files/RecidivismRelease.pdf Once again, These are not isolated conclusions but are the same outcomes in the majority of reports on this subject from multiple government agencies and throughout the academic community. No one can doubt that child sexual abuse is traumatic and devastating. The question is not whether the state has an interest in preventing such harm, but whether current laws are effective in doing so. Megan’s law is a failure and is destroying families and their children’s lives and is costing tax payers millions upon millions of dollars. The following is just one example of the estimated cost just to implement SORNA which many states refused to do. From Justice Policy Institute. Estimated cost to implement SORNA Here are some of the estimates made in 2009 expressed in 2014 current dollars: California, $66M; Florida, $34M; Illinois, $24M; New York, $35M; Pennsylvania, $22M; Texas, $44M. In 2014 dollars, Virginia’s estimate for implementation was $14M, and the annual operating cost after that would be $10M. For the US, the total is $547M. That’s over half a billion dollars – every year – for something that doesn’t work. http://www.justicepolicy.org/images/upload/08-08_FAC_SORNACosts_JJ.pdf. Attempting to use under-reporting to justify the existence of the registry is another myth, or a lie. This is another form of misinformation perpetrated by those who either have a fiduciary interest in continuing the unconstitutional treatment of a disfavored group or are seeking to justify their need for punishment for people who have already paid for their crime by loss of their freedom through incarceration and are now attempting to reenter society as honest citizens. When this information is placed into the public’s attention by naive media then you have to wonder if the media also falls into one of these two groups that are not truly interested in reporting the truth. Both of these groups of people that have that type of mentality can be classified as vigilantes, bullies, or sociopaths, and are responsible for the destruction of our constitutional values and the erosion of personal freedoms in this country. I think the media or other organizations need to do a in depth investigation into the false assumptions and false data that has been used to further these laws and to research all the collateral damages being caused by these laws and the unconstitutional injustices that are occurring across the country. They should include these injustices in their report so the public can be better informed on what is truly happening in this country on this subject. Thank you for your time.

  2. Freedom as granted in the Constitution cannot be summarily disallowed without Due Process. Unable to to to the gym, church, bowling alley? What is this 1984 level nonsense? Congrats to Brian for having the courage to say that this was enough! and Congrats to the ACLU on the win!

  3. America's hyper-phobia about convicted sex offenders must end! Politicians must stop pandering to knee-jerk public hysteria. And the public needs to learn the facts. Research by the California Sex Offender Management Board as shown a recidivism rate for convicted sex offenders of less than 1%. Less than 1%! Furthermore, research shows that by year 17 after their conviction, a convicted sex offender is no more likely to commit a new sex offense than any other member of the public. Put away your torches and pitchforks. Get the facts. Stop hysteria.

  4. He was convicted 23 years ago. How old was he then? He probably was a juvenile. People do stupid things, especially before their brain is fully developed. Why are we continuing to punish him in 2016? If he hasn't re-offended by now, it's very, very unlikely he ever will. He paid for his mistake sufficiently. Let him live his life in peace.

  5. This year, Notre Dame actually enrolled an equal amount of male and female students.

ADVERTISEMENT