Law Firms

Registration goes online

August 3, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Entering the 21st century is no longer optional for Indiana lawyers. When it comes to attorney registration, paper forms are history to make way for a new web portal.
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Partner pay rises despite economic recession

August 3, 2011
Scott Olson
Partners at Indianapolis’ largest law firms are enjoying healthy pay increases despite the tough economic times.

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It is never too early to network

August 3, 2011
Jenny Montgomery

When Karen Murphy receives a resume, the first thing she does is ask around the office to see if anyone knows the applicant. Murphy, firm administrator for Drewry Simmons Vornehm, is one of many people who say that knowing the right people – and understanding how to talk to them – can offer new lawyers an advantage in a competitive job market.

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Indianapolis attorney creates rescue mission for displaced children

July 20, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Tim Rowe enjoys practicing law but also wants to help others around the world.
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Students learn through Leaders in Firms Emerging

July 20, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Five students from an Indianapolis high school held summer internships through Leaders in Firms Emerging, which included working at law firms.
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Lawyers look to Internet, social media for clues

July 20, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Surveying social media is becoming more common in trial preparation.
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Golf course manager suing DuPont over herbicide

July 19, 2011
Scott Olson
An Indianapolis-based golf course manager is leading a national class-action lawsuit charging that a herbicide manufactured by DuPont is killing trees and other vegetation.
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Legal trend utilizes AG experience

July 6, 2011
Michael Hoskins
When he was the state’s top prosecutor, former Indiana Attorney General Jeff Modisett saw the beginning of a trend that’s now become a focus of his practice.
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DTCI: Summer associates: Find your 'Bill Wooden' mentor

July 6, 2011
Michael Rabinowitch
DTCI member Misha Rabinowitch reflects on his mentor, Bill Wooden.
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JLAP offers depression support for lawyers

June 22, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Dedication to clients, competitiveness, and a strong work ethic are qualities that many successful lawyers share. Those same traits may put attorneys at greater risk for major depression if they end up demanding more from themselves than they’re able to give.
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New lawyers face tough job market

June 22, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
In June, the National Association for Law Placement released key findings stating 2010 was the worst job market for law school graduates since the mid-1990s. For graduates whose employment was known, only 68.4 percent obtained jobs that required bar passage – the lowest number in that category since NALP began collecting data on law graduates in the early 1980s.
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Law firm managers plan for the worst

June 8, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Like other businesses, law firms know it is vital to be able to serve clients during times of disaster. Locally, many firms have begun developing or have revisited business continuity plans – particularly after 2006 when a strong storm whipped through downtown Indianapolis and shattered the windows in a high-rise building, displacing several law firms.
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Switching sides: defenders become plaintiffs' attorneys

June 8, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Bloomington attorney Mike Phelps was a successful defender for insurance companies for nine years.  But a personal injury case that he won on behalf of the defendant caused him to question whether he was ready for a change.
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Family law attorney dies after battle with cancer

June 8, 2011
IL Staff
Attorney Stephenie Sutliff Jocham, a founder of Carmel firm Jocham Harden Dimick Jackson, died June 2 following a battle with cancer.
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ISBA president opens new firm

June 8, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
After nearly 10 years working for a nationally known law firm in Terre Haute, Jeffry Lind, president of the Indiana State Bar Association, has opened his own practice.
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Family law attorney dies after battle with cancer

June 2, 2011
IL Staff
Attorney Stephenie Jocham, a founder of Carmel firm Jocham Harden Dimick Jackson, died Thursday morning following a battle with cancer, the firm announced.
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IU - Indy to host Summer Legal Institute

June 1, 2011
Jennifer Nelson

Central Indiana students who have an interest in the law will get an up-close-and-personal look at it through an intensive summer program beginning June 6 at Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis.

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Inspiration through loss

May 25, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Charity founders discuss the origins of their organizations - Kate Cares, Outrun the Sun, and the Joseph Maley Foundation.
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Diverse legal team brings diverse perspective

May 11, 2011
Kelly Lucas
Ask if it is important for law firms to comprise a diversified group of lawyers, and the answer will be a resounding “yes.” Mirroring society’s cultural mix, expanding the firm’s thought pool, and improving the ability of clients to identify with their lawyers are all reasons diversity makes good business sense.
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AG's food drive raises more than 140,000 pounds of food

May 5, 2011
IL Staff
Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller’s March Against Hunger challenge among law firms has raised the equivalent of nearly 144,000 pounds of food for needy Hoosiers.
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Bicycling barristers

April 27, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Lawyers say fitness and networking are among the perks of traveling to the office on two wheels.
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Green construction poses legal risks

April 27, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Standard contracts aren't adequate for this budding industry.
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Firm to offer free children's bike helmets at PedalPalooza

April 27, 2011
IL Staff
Staff from Parr Richey Obremskey Frandsen & Patterson will give away one boys bicycle, one girls bicycle, and will pass out bike reflectors and 100 free children’s bicycle helmets on April 30.
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Quayles create scholarship for Indy law school

April 26, 2011
IL Staff
Former Vice President Dan Quayle and his wife, Marilyn, have created a scholarship for students at Indiana University School of Law-Indianapolis through an endowed gift of $200,000. The Quayles both earned their law degrees from the school in 1974.
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Attorneys discuss pros and cons of practicing in 2 states

April 13, 2011
Rebecca Berfanger, Jenny Montgomery
Attorneys in Indiana know that they must meet certain ongoing requirements to maintain their law licenses: CLE hours, and staying abreast of procedural changes. Why, then, would anyone want to be licensed in two states?
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  1. I have been on this program while on parole from 2011-2013. No person should be forced mentally to share private details of their personal life with total strangers. Also giving permission for a mental therapist to report to your parole agent that your not participating in group therapy because you don't have the financial mean to be in the group therapy. I was personally singled out and sent back three times for not having money and also sent back within the six month when you aren't to be sent according to state law. I will work to het this INSOMM's removed from this state. I also had twelve or thirteen parole agents with a fifteen month period. Thanks for your time.

  2. Our nation produces very few jurists of the caliber of Justice DOUGLAS and his peers these days. Here is that great civil libertarian, who recognized government as both a blessing and, when corrupted by ideological interests, a curse: "Once the investigator has only the conscience of government as a guide, the conscience can become ‘ravenous,’ as Cromwell, bent on destroying Thomas More, said in Bolt, A Man For All Seasons (1960), p. 120. The First Amendment mirrors many episodes where men, harried and harassed by government, sought refuge in their conscience, as these lines of Thomas More show: ‘MORE: And when we stand before God, and you are sent to Paradise for doing according to your conscience, *575 and I am damned for not doing according to mine, will you come with me, for fellowship? ‘CRANMER: So those of us whose names are there are damned, Sir Thomas? ‘MORE: I don't know, Your Grace. I have no window to look into another man's conscience. I condemn no one. ‘CRANMER: Then the matter is capable of question? ‘MORE: Certainly. ‘CRANMER: But that you owe obedience to your King is not capable of question. So weigh a doubt against a certainty—and sign. ‘MORE: Some men think the Earth is round, others think it flat; it is a matter capable of question. But if it is flat, will the King's command make it round? And if it is round, will the King's command flatten it? No, I will not sign.’ Id., pp. 132—133. DOUGLAS THEN WROTE: Where government is the Big Brother,11 privacy gives way to surveillance. **909 But our commitment is otherwise. *576 By the First Amendment we have staked our security on freedom to promote a multiplicity of ideas, to associate at will with kindred spirits, and to defy governmental intrusion into these precincts" Gibson v. Florida Legislative Investigation Comm., 372 U.S. 539, 574-76, 83 S. Ct. 889, 908-09, 9 L. Ed. 2d 929 (1963) Mr. Justice DOUGLAS, concurring. I write: Happy Memorial Day to all -- God please bless our fallen who lived and died to preserve constitutional governance in our wonderful series of Republics. And God open the eyes of those government officials who denounce the constitutions of these Republics by arbitrary actions arising out capricious motives.

  3. From back in the day before secularism got a stranglehold on Hoosier jurists comes this great excerpt via Indiana federal court judge Allan Sharp, dedicated to those many Indiana government attorneys (with whom I have dealt) who count the law as a mere tool, an optional tool that is not to be used when political correctness compels a more acceptable result than merely following the path that the law directs: ALLEN SHARP, District Judge. I. In a scene following a visit by Henry VIII to the home of Sir Thomas More, playwriter Robert Bolt puts the following words into the mouths of his characters: Margaret: Father, that man's bad. MORE: There is no law against that. ROPER: There is! God's law! MORE: Then God can arrest him. ROPER: Sophistication upon sophistication! MORE: No, sheer simplicity. The law, Roper, the law. I know what's legal not what's right. And I'll stick to what's legal. ROPER: Then you set man's law above God's! MORE: No, far below; but let me draw your attention to a fact I'm not God. The currents and eddies of right and wrong, which you find such plain sailing, I can't navigate. I'm no voyager. But in the thickets of law, oh, there I'm a forester. I doubt if there's a man alive who could follow me there, thank God... ALICE: (Exasperated, pointing after Rich) While you talk, he's gone! MORE: And go he should, if he was the Devil himself, until he broke the law! ROPER: So now you'd give the Devil benefit of law! MORE: Yes. What would you do? Cut a great road through the law to get after the Devil? ROPER: I'd cut down every law in England to do that! MORE: (Roused and excited) Oh? (Advances on Roper) And when the last law was down, and the Devil turned round on you where would you hide, Roper, the laws being flat? (He leaves *1257 him) This country's planted thick with laws from coast to coast man's laws, not God's and if you cut them down and you're just the man to do it d'you really think you would stand upright in the winds that would blow then? (Quietly) Yes, I'd give the Devil benefit of law, for my own safety's sake. ROPER: I have long suspected this; this is the golden calf; the law's your god. MORE: (Wearily) Oh, Roper, you're a fool, God's my god... (Rather bitterly) But I find him rather too (Very bitterly) subtle... I don't know where he is nor what he wants. ROPER: My God wants service, to the end and unremitting; nothing else! MORE: (Dryly) Are you sure that's God! He sounds like Moloch. But indeed it may be God And whoever hunts for me, Roper, God or Devil, will find me hiding in the thickets of the law! And I'll hide my daughter with me! Not hoist her up the mainmast of your seagoing principles! They put about too nimbly! (Exit More. They all look after him). Pgs. 65-67, A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS A Play in Two Acts, Robert Bolt, Random House, New York, 1960. Linley E. Pearson, Atty. Gen. of Indiana, Indianapolis, for defendants. Childs v. Duckworth, 509 F. Supp. 1254, 1256 (N.D. Ind. 1981) aff'd, 705 F.2d 915 (7th Cir. 1983)

  4. "Meanwhile small- and mid-size firms are getting squeezed and likely will not survive unless they become a boutique firm." I've been a business attorney in small, and now mid-size firm for over 30 years, and for over 30 years legal consultants have been preaching this exact same mantra of impending doom for small and mid-sized firms -- verbatim. This claim apparently helps them gin up merger opportunities from smaller firms who become convinced that they need to become larger overnight. The claim that large corporations are interested in cost-saving and efficiency has likewise been preached for decades, and is likewise bunk. If large corporations had any real interest in saving money they wouldn't use large law firms whose rates are substantially higher than those of high-quality mid-sized firms.

  5. The family is the foundation of all human government. That is the Grand Design. Modern governments throw off this Design and make bureaucratic war against the family, as does Hollywood and cultural elitists such as third wave feminists. Since WWII we have been on a ship of fools that way, with both the elite and government and their social engineering hacks relentlessly attacking the very foundation of social order. And their success? See it in the streets of Fergusson, on the food stamp doles (mostly broken families)and in the above article. Reject the Grand Design for true social function, enter the Glorious State to manage social dysfunction. Our Brave New World will be a prison camp, and we will welcome it as the only way to manage given the anarchy without it.

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