Law Schools

Call IP attorney Donald Knebel the ‘master of the facts’

April 9, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Ironically, the eight years that veteran attorney Donald Knebel spent avoiding intellectual property law gave him the experience he needed when he finally turned his attention to patent litigation.
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Carson to honor McKinney alums for public interest work

April 8, 2014
IL Staff
Indiana 7th District Rep. Andre Carson will be the keynote speaker at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law’s annual Public Interest Recognition Dinner April 12, where three graduates will be honored for their work.
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Memory of Fort Wayne attorney honored with endowed scholarship at Indiana Tech Law School

April 3, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
The Fort Wayne law firm of Shambaugh Kast Beck & Williams LLP has endowed a $25,000 scholarship to Indiana Tech Law School, giving a boost to the law school which welcomed its inaugural class in August 2013.
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Indiana Law Review focuses on data privacy

April 1, 2014
IL Staff
“Data Privacy in the Digital Age” is the focus of the Indiana Law Review Symposium Friday at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law in Indianapolis.
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IU Maurer, Rose-Hulman create IP scholars program

March 26, 2014
IL Staff
A new program established by Indiana University Maurer School of Law and Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology will allow select Rose-Hulman graduates to study at the IU law school at a reduced tuition rate.
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Law school ranking rumble

March 26, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Law school deans protest U.S. News & World Report's "best" schools list but say they cannot ignore it because they don't want their schools to fall in the rankings.
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Dean's Desk: Are we satisfied with the color of the legal profession?

March 26, 2014
Ivan Bodensteiner
Ivan Bodensteiner writes about why it is difficult to achieve racial equity within law schools and the profession.
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Symposium to look at neuroscience and the law

March 20, 2014
IL Staff
The Indiana Health Law Review Symposium March 28 will examine neuroscience and mental health law; child contact sports and concussions, and other topics at the daylong event.
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Brown v. Board of Ed plaintiff first Indiana Tech distinguished lecturer

March 18, 2014
IL Staff
Indiana Tech Law School’s inaugural distinguished lecturer is Cheryl Brown Henderson, one of the plaintiffs in the historic Supreme Court of the United States’ decision Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas.
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Indiana Tech Law School mentors bring law to life

March 12, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
A unique program at the Fort Wayne school matches students with attorneys and judges for real-world learning.
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Indiana law schools slip from top 25 in annual rankings

March 11, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
The annual ranking that law schools love to hate was released March 11, and it may stir more emotions than usual in Indiana since none of the state’s law school placed in the top 25.
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Senate to honor McKinney law professor Lawrence Jegen

March 10, 2014
IL Staff
A longtime Indiana University McKinney School of Law professor will be honored in the General Assembly today for an influential career spanning more than 50 years.
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Fellow at Ukrainian law school to speak at IU McKinney

March 7, 2014
IL Staff
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law will focus on the troubled country of Ukraine during an upcoming lecture presented through the International Student Speaker Series.
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IU Maurer moot court judges include justice, bankruptcy judge

March 6, 2014
IL Staff
Indiana Justice Loretta H. Rush and U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Robyn L. Moberly of the Southern District of Indiana will join three others Friday in presiding over the final round of Indiana University Maurer School of Law’s annual Sherman Minton Moot Court Competition.
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ABA: Valpo Law enrollment surges; McKinney, ND down; Maurer ticks up

March 5, 2014
Dave Stafford
First-year law school enrollment jumped 28 percent this academic year at Valparaiso University Law School, according to data from the American Bar Association.
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IU McKinney dean's diplomacy skills navigate law school during turbulent time

February 26, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
At the end of a long conversation about the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law, Dean Andrew Klein showed his passion for the law.
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Dean's Desk: Legal education partners enhance law school experience

February 26, 2014
Peter Alexander
At Indiana Tech Law School, we have decided to partner with our local legal community in order to break out of the mold of the “traditional law school.” The judges and lawyers in Northeast Indiana and Northwest Ohio have been invited to invest themselves in the success of our school and in the professional development of our students, and they have stepped up in a big way to help us.
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Gifts to IU McKinney enabling school to establish endowed chair and fellowship

February 17, 2014
IL Staff
The Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law is endowing its first faculty chair made possible by the gift from school’s namesake donor.
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Why I love the law

February 12, 2014
IL Staff
In honor of Valentine’s Day, we asked Indiana Lawyer readers to tell us why they love the law. The responses contain a common theme – people – whether it’s working with talented colleagues, teaching others about the law or helping people navigate through the legal waters.
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ABA task force advises review of law school costs

February 12, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
In its year and a half examination of how lawyers are educated, the American Bar Association Task Force on the Future of Legal Education concluded the financial system law schools have developed to provide that education must be re-engineered.
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Shepard offering recommendations for changing legal education to ABA

February 10, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Retired Indiana Chief Justice Randall Shepard will present the final findings and recommendations of the American Bar Association Task Force on the Future of Legal Education to the ABA House of Delegates Monday.
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IU McKinney dean emeritus taking legal skills to the Olympics

January 29, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
After receiving the unexpected invitation to help at the 2014 Olympic Winter Games, Gary Roberts said he did not think about it for more than a second before accepting.
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Attorneys finding more link rot online

January 29, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Just a few days after the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals issued its opinion in his case, attorney Brian Paul searched for the website the court had cited and discovered not everything on the Internet is permanent.
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Inbox: Attorney responds to letter suggesting refunds for failing bar exam

January 29, 2014
In reply to Mr. Robert C. Thompson, Jr.’s proposal in the “Viewpoint” column that law schools issue full refunds when alumni fail the Bar Exam twice, attorney Sally Hubbard respectfully disagrees.
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ICLEO application deadline nears

January 28, 2014
IL Staff
College graduates eligible for the Indiana Conference for Legal Education Opportunity have little more than two weeks to submit applications to be selected for the 2014 ICLEO Fellowship Summer Institute from June 15-July 25 at Valparaiso University Law School.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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