Law Schools

IU McKinney observers illuminate murky proceedings in Gitmo trials

February 25, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
The U.S. Military Commission Observation Project overseen by Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law is continuing to send individuals to watch and report on the accused terrorists’ trials being held at Guantanamo Bay. Blog posts and articles from the observers chronicle the glacial pace of the proceedings, the unexpected courtroom twists and the nagging constitutional questions.
More

‘No relief’ for law school enrollment slump

February 25, 2015
Indianapolis Business Journal, J.K. Wall
After three down years for law school enrollment, Austen Parrish expected a rebound of applications and enrollment this year at Indiana University Maurer School of Law. But it isn’t happening.
More

Rising cost of legal education sparked creation of ABA task force

February 25, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
At public law schools, the average tuition and fees across the country for in-state residents skyrocketed 123 percent between 2003 and 2013. Private law schools were marginally better, logging an increase of 64 percent, according to a 2014 analysis by Robert Kuehn, professor at Washington University School of Law in St. Louis.
More

The first 2 law schools to drop the LSAT could be just the beginning

February 24, 2015
 Bloomberg News
Two law schools said this month that they would begin accepting applicants who have not taken the Law School Admissions Test, a move that may help curb weak interest and plunging enrollments in law schools across the country.
More

New class at Notre Dame gets students to think about technology’s impact

February 11, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Lawyers should not feel threatened by the new programs and websites that, in some cases, let lay people handle some of their legal issues, an attorney and legal technology entrepreneur says. In fact, the new technology actually allows lawyers to fill their true role as counselors.
More

Gitmo’s future to be discussed at IU McKinney

February 6, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Guantanamo Bay and its long-term consequences will be examined during the annual symposium of the Indiana International and Comparative Law Review at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law.
More

IU Maurer teams up with 5 women’s colleges for scholarships

February 4, 2015
IL Staff
Indiana University Maurer School of Law announced Wednesday that it has established scholarship and mentoring programs for graduates of five liberal arts colleges for women.
More

New part-time law school program launched at Indiana Tech

January 30, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana Tech Law School has started a part-time day program to allow students to obtain their J.D. in as many as seven years.
More

Valparaiso Law Dean Andrea Lyon built a career battling the death penalty

January 28, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Lyon remains a passionate, unwavering opponent of capital punishment. Her career path has turned from the courtroom to education. The dean of Valparaiso University Law School maintains a strong connection to death penalty work.
More

Chicago law professor to give Valpo’s MLK lecture

January 19, 2015
IL Staff
A DePaul University College of Law professor, well-known as a scholar in the areas of employment and labor law and voting rights, will be the featured speaker at Valparaiso University Law School’s Martin Luther King Jr. Lecture Thursday.
More

Author and death penalty opponent Sister Helen Prejean calls for judicial reform

January 14, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
When she became pen pals with an inmate on Louisiana’s death row, Sister Helen Prejean said she did not know much about the law or the U.S. Constitution. She was not aware of constitutional protections or how the Supreme Court of the United States was interpreting them.
More

McKinney slates living wage panel discussion

January 13, 2015
IL Staff
“Living Wages as a Human Right” is the topic of a forum next week at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law.
More

Lawyers for Wal-Mart shopper slain by police to speak at Maurer

January 13, 2015
IL Staff
Lawyers representing the family of an African-American man killed in a police action shooting while he was shopping at an Ohio Wal-Mart store will talk about the case next week at Indiana University Maurer School of Law.
More

National Jurist: IU’s Henderson most influential in legal education

January 8, 2015
IL Staff
Indiana University Maurer School of Law Professor William Henderson is the nation’s most influential person in legal education, according to rankings appearing in the January 2015 edition of National Jurist magazine.
More

2014 Year in Review

December 31, 2014
IL Staff
This year could be described as a historic one for Indiana. The state's ban on gay marriage was overturned by the courts, and, for the first time, a woman was chosen as chief justice of the Indiana Supreme Court. In fact, women are leading most of the courts in Indiana. In 2014, we saw changes in the law schools, a new criminal code implemented, and attorneys in trouble with the court and the law. (Remember the attorney who doesn't like to wear socks?)
More

Dean's Desk: IU McKinney is out in front with experiential learning

December 17, 2014
Andrew Klein
Our school is proud to provide students the ability to study at the center of the state’s legal profession, with an array of opportunities to learn both inside and outside the classroom.
More

IU McKinney partners with USI for legal scholarship

December 10, 2014
IL Staff
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney and the University of Southern Indiana have created a scholar program that will allow two students from USI to attend IU McKinney, beginning in the fall 2015.
More

Indiana Tech taps a Cooley dean to lead law school

December 3, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Charles Cercone, associate dean of faculty and professor at Western Michigan University’s Thomas M. Cooley Law School, says the opportunity at Indiana's newest law school is "simply unique."
More

Dean's Desk: Educating, supporting those called to the law

December 3, 2014
Andrea D. Lyon
The legal system plays a foundational role in a free society, and those who are called to this profession have an exciting opportunity to demonstrate their humanity while serving others.
More

Fewer young attorneys enter graying profession, instead find alternative uses for JDs

December 3, 2014
Dave Stafford
Recent Indiana law school graduates are broadening their horizons, with many taking nontraditional post-graduate paths in the business world as the legal profession is increasingly graying.
More

Free lecture concludes IU Maurer’s 'Brown at 60' series

December 2, 2014
IL Staff
Award-winning author and DePauw University professor emeritus of history John Dittmer will deliver the final lecture in Indiana University Maurer School of Law’s “Brown at 60” series Dec. 3 at noon. The lecture is free and open to the public in the law school’s moot court room.
More

Indiana Tech names new law school dean

November 25, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana Tech Law School has tapped Charles Cercone to serve as dean, concluding a search that began in May.
More

IU McKinney creates 2 new partnerships

November 21, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law has announced another partnership to identify top undergraduates who want to pursue a legal education at the Indianapolis law school.
More

Indiana law schools part of a trend to establish exchanges with China

November 19, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
In addition to the scholarly research and visiting professorships, student exchanges between China and three Indiana law schools – IU McKinney, IU Maurer and Notre Dame Law School – give students in both countries the opportunity to learn about the law of another country as well as its culture and history.
More

Dean's Desk: Truly integrated experiential education

November 19, 2014
andre douglas pond cummings
Legal education has lost its way. While many law schools seek to update and modernize their approach through the adoption of some required skills instruction and the addition of clinical experiences for more of their students, a significantly more aggressive approach is necessary to reform legal education fully and prepare law students to enter the practice of law today.
More
Page  << 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 >> pager
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  2. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  3. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

  4. For some strange reason this story, like many on this ezine that question the powerful, seems to have been released in two formats. Prior format here: http://www.theindianalawyer.com/nominees-selected-for-us-attorney-in-indiana/PARAMS/article/44263 That observed, I must note that it is quite refreshing that denizens of the great unwashed (like me) can be allowed to openly question powerful elitists at ICE MILLER who are on the public dole like Selby. Kudos to those at this ezine who understand that they cannot be mere lapdogs to the powerful and corrupt, lest freedom bleed out. If you wonder why the Senator resisted Selby, consider reading the comments here for a theory: http://www.theindianalawyer.com/nominees-selected-for-us-attorney-in-indiana/PARAMS/article/44263

  5. Why is it a crisis that people want to protect their rights themselves? The courts have a huge bias against people appearing on their own behalf and these judges and lawyers will face their maker one day and answer for their actions.

ADVERTISEMENT