Law Schools

Former dean named interim dean at Valparaiso University Law School

March 19, 2013
IL Staff
A nationally recognized authority on constitutional law and civil rights has taken the leadership position at Valparaiso University Law School.
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Klein named dean of IU McKinney School of Law

March 19, 2013
IL Staff
Andrew R. Klein has been appointed dean of the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law.
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Reagan administration counsel to participate in symposium at McKinney

March 18, 2013
IL Staff
A former Reagan administration official will join the group of academic, government and business leaders making presentations next month at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law’s symposium on the Law and Financial Crisis.
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Conison taking helm of young law school

March 13, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Jay Conison had been planning to step down as dean of the Valparaiso University Law School, but his decision to lead another law school was an unexpected opportunity and one that will keep him focused on changing legal education.
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Dean's Desk: Notre Dame Law in Chicago shows promise

March 13, 2013
Nell Jessup Netwon
Chicago is the No. 1 destination for Notre Dame Law School graduates, followed closely by Washington, D.C., New York City and Los Angeles, with Indianapolis rounding out the top five. But while many NDLS students plan to practice law in a major metropolitan area, until recently there were limited opportunities for them to explore and experience what it is actually like to practice law in a big city.
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Law School Briefs 3/13/13

March 13, 2013
Read news from the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law.
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Justice Clarence Thomas visits Notre Dame Law School

March 13, 2013
IL Staff
U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Clarence Thomas visited the Notre Dame Law School March 5 and 6 as the Judge James J. Clynes Jr. Visiting Chair.
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2 Indiana law schools in top 25 of annual ranking

March 12, 2013
IL Staff
Using a new methodology that takes into account the number of graduates who found jobs in the legal profession, U.S. News & World Report released Tuesday its latest ranking of law schools.
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Law symposium to look at patient responsibility

March 6, 2013
IL Staff
This year’s Indiana Health Law Review Symposium at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law will explore patient responsibility as a key to improving the health care system.
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U.S. Justice Clarence Thomas visits Notre Dame Law School

March 5, 2013
IL Staff
U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Clarence Thomas is at Notre Dame Law School Tuesday and Wednesday as the Judge James J. Clynes Visiting Chair. He will visit several law classes and speak with students and faculty.
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5 sitting jurists to judge moot court competition Friday

March 1, 2013
Jennifer Nelson
A panel of distinguished judges, including one from the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals, will be on hand Friday evening to hear final arguments in a case involving judicial recusal and eminent domain as part of the Indiana University Maurer School of Law Sherman Minton Moot Court Competition.
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Law school’s environmental symposium features senior adviser to EPA

February 27, 2013
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law’s sixth annual spring environmental symposium on March 1 includes keynote speaker Cameron Davis, a longtime advocate for Great Lakes conservation.
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Law School Briefs - 2/27/13

February 27, 2013
Read about news happening at the state's law schools.
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Valparaiso dean leaving for Charlotte law school

February 21, 2013
Jennifer Nelson
Jay Conison, dean of Valparaiso University Law School since 1998, has been named as the new dean of Charlotte School of Law, effective April 15.
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Indiana law schools change curriculum to chart new course

February 13, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Like many of their educational colleagues across the country, Indiana law schools have been reviewing and rethinking the way they prepare their students for the legal profession.
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IU professor: Legal education in the US needs to change

February 13, 2013
Abigail Johnson Donohoo
In his "Blueprint for Change" research paper, Indiana University Maurer School of Law Professor William Henderson says the legal education system needs to change. He also offers a plan to transform legal education to better fit the changing legal marketplace.
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Dean's Desk: A new curriculum at Valparaiso Law School

February 13, 2013
Jay Conison
Law schools have two natures. On the one hand, they are graduate academic programs, generally in universities. On the other hand, a law school is a path to a career. Through the educational program and other services, it develops professional skills in students and supports their entry into law or other professional practice.
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Filling the classroom

February 13, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana Tech Law School is recruiting students with a one-on-one approach.
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Longtime IU Maurer dean worked in ‘dream job’ for 33 years

February 4, 2013
IL Staff
Leonard Dennis Fromm, associate dean for students and alumni affairs at Indiana University Maurer School of Law, died Feb. 2 at the I.U. Health Bone Marrow Transplant Unit in Indianapolis. A celebration of his life will be held later this week.
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Mock trial judges needed for new tournament in Indianapolis

January 17, 2013
IL Staff
Indiana University Bloomington Mock Trial organization is seeking practicing attorneys as volunteers for its first tournament, the Hoosier Hoedown, in Indianapolis. The tournament is Jan. 26 and 27 in the Indianapolis City-County Building.
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IU McKinney professor recognized for work in courtrooms and classrooms

January 16, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law professor Joel Schumm never forgets his mother telling him that life is not fair. Still he wants to make it a little fairer.
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Law School Briefs - 1/16/13

January 16, 2013
IL Staff
Read news from around the state's four law schools.
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2012 Year in Review

January 2, 2013
IL Staff
2012 was another busy year for the legal community. We welcomed new justices and a new chief justice, witnessed the beginnings of the state’s fifth law school, and saw local stories garner national and international attention. Here’s a look back at the top news stories from last year.
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Law School Briefs - 12/21/12

December 19, 2012
IL Staff
Read news from Indiana's law schools.
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Law School Briefs - 12/7/12

December 5, 2012
IL Staff
Golden Dome alumnus awarded a fellowship with solicitor general; I.U. Maurer to collaborate with 2 Brazilian schools of law.
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  1. Too many attorneys take their position as a license to intimidate and threaten non attorneys in person and by mail. Did find it ironic that a reader moved to comment twice on this article could not complete a paragraph without resorting to insulting name calling (rethuglican) as a substitute for reasoned discussion. Some people will never get the point this action should have made.

  2. People have heard of Magna Carta, and not the Provisions of Oxford & Westminster. Not that anybody really cares. Today, it might be considered ethnic or racial bias to talk about the "Anglo Saxon common law." I don't even see the word English in the blurb above. Anyhow speaking of Edward I-- he was famously intolerant of diversity himself viz the Edict of Expulsion 1290. So all he did too like making parliament a permanent institution-- that all must be discredited. 100 years from now such commemorations will be in the dustbin of history.

  3. Oops, I meant discipline, not disciple. Interesting that those words share such a close relationship. We attorneys are to be disciples of the law, being disciplined to serve the law and its source, the constitutions. Do that, and the goals of Magna Carta are advanced. Do that not and Magna Carta is usurped. Do that not and you should be disciplined. Do that and you should be counted a good disciple. My experiences, once again, do not reveal a process that is adhering to the due process ideals of Magna Carta. Just the opposite, in fact. Braveheart's dying rebel (for a great cause) yell comes to mind.

  4. It is not a sign of the times that many Ind licensed attorneys (I am not) would fear writing what I wrote below, even if they had experiences to back it up. Let's take a minute to thank God for the brave Baron's who risked death by torture to tell the government that it was in the wrong. Today is a career ruination that whistleblowers risk. That is often brought on by denial of licenses or disciple for those who dare speak truth to power. Magna Carta says truth rules power, power too often claims that truth matters not, only Power. Fight such power for the good of our constitutional republics. If we lose them we have only bureaucratic tyranny to pass onto our children. Government attorneys, of all lawyers, should best realize this and work to see our patrimony preserved. I am now a government attorney (once again) in Kansas, and respecting the rule of law is my passion, first and foremost.

  5. I have dealt with more than a few I-465 moat-protected government attorneys and even judges who just cannot seem to wrap their heads around the core of this 800 year old document. I guess monarchial privileges and powers corrupt still ..... from an academic website on this fantastic "treaty" between the King and the people ... "Enduring Principles of Liberty Magna Carta was written by a group of 13th-century barons to protect their rights and property against a tyrannical king. There are two principles expressed in Magna Carta that resonate to this day: "No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned, disseised, outlawed, banished, or in any way destroyed, nor will We proceed against or prosecute him, except by the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land." "To no one will We sell, to no one will We deny or delay, right or justice." Inspiration for Americans During the American Revolution, Magna Carta served to inspire and justify action in liberty’s defense. The colonists believed they were entitled to the same rights as Englishmen, rights guaranteed in Magna Carta. They embedded those rights into the laws of their states and later into the Constitution and Bill of Rights. The Fifth Amendment to the Constitution ("no person shall . . . be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.") is a direct descendent of Magna Carta's guarantee of proceedings according to the "law of the land." http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/magna_carta/

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