Indiana General Assembly

Indiana considers prohibiting cities from banning Airbnb

March 20, 2017
 Associated Press
Indiana cities and towns wouldn’t be allowed to restrict companies such as Airbnb under a proposal state lawmakers are considering as they wade into the parochial matters of property rights and zoning disputes.
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Bar association speaks out against bill banning prospective liability releases

March 17, 2017
Olivia Covington
One of the state’s largest bar associations is speaking out against a bill in the Indiana General Assembly that would prohibit attorneys’ ability to prospectively release themselves from malpractice liability.
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Advocates of hate crime statute still pushing Legislature to act

March 16, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
With a little more than a month remaining in the 2017 Indiana General Assembly session, advocates are ramping up their efforts to get hate crime legislation through the Statehouse this year.
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Panel backs letting staffers have guns in Statehouse

March 16, 2017
 Associated Press
Legislative employees could carry guns as they go about their duties at the Indiana Statehouse under a National Rifle Association-backed measure that is advancing.
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Indiana lawmakers weigh banning so-called sanctuary campuses

March 13, 2017
 Associated Press
As universities across the U.S. grapple with whether to adopt policies intended to protect students in the country without legal permission, Indiana lawmakers are weighing a proposal that would ban so-called sanctuary campuses.
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Indiana bill creates emergency contact database

March 8, 2017
 Associated Press
Law enforcement officers responding to a tragic car accident could quickly notify an emergency contact under an Indiana bill.
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Indiana gun measures head toward final approval

March 8, 2017
Dave Stafford
Two firearms bills moved closer to final approval in the Indiana Legislature Wednesday.
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Twitter troll takes over lawmaker's handle, demands apology

March 8, 2017
 Associated Press
An Indiana state lawmaker who says he won’t “give in to terrorists” is refusing an apology demand from an unknown person who took over his abandoned Twitter handle.
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Indiana legislators pursue legal careers after taking elected office

March 8, 2017
Olivia Covington
Being Indiana legislators inspired a handful to go to law school while working in the General Assembly.
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Indiana’s civil forfeiture laws under scrutiny

March 8, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
Legislation and lawsuits seek to curb the government’s ability to seize private property.
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7th Circuit opinion shapes overhaul of vaping law

March 8, 2017
Olivia Covington
Guidance from the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals was the driving force behind an overhaul of Indiana’s controversial vaping law, which is now before the House of Representatives in a significantly amended form.
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Solar bill draws heat

March 8, 2017
Dave Stafford
Homeowners, churches, schools among those who decry slashing incentives, though big arrays may thrive under the legislation.
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Children’s commission bill advances

March 3, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
A bill that would allow the Commission on Improving the Status of Children in Indiana to hire an executive director, costing an estimated $150,000 annually, will be presented to the Senate Committee on Family and Children Services Monday.
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Bill prohibiting sanctuary campuses moves to Indiana House

March 1, 2017
Olivia Covington
A bill meant to require Indiana colleges and universities to comply with federal immigration investigations has passed the Senate, though concerns remain about the policy’s implication on Indiana campuses.
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Mass protest study committee bill clears Indiana Senate

March 1, 2017
 Associated Press
A bill originally allowing authorities to use "any means necessary" to keep roadways clear during a protest but then reduced to a legislative study committee issue has cleared the Indiana Senate.
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Peeping drones crime bill clears Indiana Senate

March 1, 2017
 Associated Press
Anyone using the advanced technology of an aerial drone to undertake the age-old crime of voyeurism could be charged with a new offense under a measure approved by the Indiana Senate.
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Indiana Senate OKs abortion bill on parental notification

March 1, 2017
 Associated Press
Pregnant minors would be unable to obtain an abortion without at least attempting to notify their parents under a measure that cleared the Indiana Senate Tuesday.
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Hate-crime bill pulled before Senate vote

February 28, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
The only hate crime bill that was sent to the Senate floor for a vote was pulled by the author yesterday after a proposed amendment from a Republican senator split support for the measure and led to the conclusion that reaching a consensus would be too difficult.
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Indiana House approves ‘abortion reversal’ bill

February 28, 2017
 Associated Press
The Indiana House has approved a measure on a so-called ‘abortion reversal’ procedure despite concerns from both sides of the aisle that the method hasn’t been sufficiently vetted.
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Indiana House OKs bill on prayer in schools

February 28, 2017
 Associated Press
A legislative proposal whose author says it would put prayer back in schools has cleared the Indiana House.
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Indiana Senate approves bill to curtail solar incentive

February 28, 2017
 Associated Press
Financial incentives for installing solar panels would be eliminated in the coming years under a bill passed Monday by the Indiana Senate.
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Senate OKs legislative employees bringing guns to work

February 24, 2017
 Associated Press
Legislative employees could join lawmakers in carrying handguns in the Indiana Statehouse under a measure advanced by the Senate.
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Republican mass protest bill softened in committee

February 23, 2017
 Associated Press
A bill calling for Indiana authorities to use "any means necessary" to keep roadways clear during a protest was softened in a Senate committee.
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Indiana Senate panel advances restrictive abortion bill

February 23, 2017
 Associated Press
An Indiana abortion bill meant to strengthen parental rights would require notifying parents when a daughter under the age of 18 pursues legal action to obtain an abortion without their consent.
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New vaping bill moves to full Senate

February 22, 2017
Olivia Covington
Less than a month after the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed a district court decision striking down the most controversial portions of Indiana’s vaping law, a new e-liquids bill designed to fall into compliance with federal regulations is moving through the General Assembly.
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  1. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  2. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  3. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

  4. For some strange reason this story, like many on this ezine that question the powerful, seems to have been released in two formats. Prior format here: http://www.theindianalawyer.com/nominees-selected-for-us-attorney-in-indiana/PARAMS/article/44263 That observed, I must note that it is quite refreshing that denizens of the great unwashed (like me) can be allowed to openly question powerful elitists at ICE MILLER who are on the public dole like Selby. Kudos to those at this ezine who understand that they cannot be mere lapdogs to the powerful and corrupt, lest freedom bleed out. If you wonder why the Senator resisted Selby, consider reading the comments here for a theory: http://www.theindianalawyer.com/nominees-selected-for-us-attorney-in-indiana/PARAMS/article/44263

  5. Why is it a crisis that people want to protect their rights themselves? The courts have a huge bias against people appearing on their own behalf and these judges and lawyers will face their maker one day and answer for their actions.

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