Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Law students and inmates learn from each other at IU McKinney’s ‘Inside-Out’ course

July 12, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
The IU McKinney course is based on the national Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program that was developed in the 1990s at Temple University. With classes now taught around the world, the program calls for outside students (typically at the undergraduate or graduate levels) to join inside students (the inmates) at a prison to discuss issues related to criminal justice.
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Top students still not interested in a JD

June 19, 2017
IL Staff
A few months before law schools around the country begin a new academic year, the number of people applying for admission has slipped, with the greatest decline coming from applicants posting the highest LSAT scores.
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ILS project aims to help tenants avoid eviction

June 14, 2017
IL Staff
Indiana Legal Services Inc. has launched a pilot program in Indianapolis specifically to help individuals and families facing eviction.
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4 lawyers and a businessman walk into a bar…

June 14, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
... and begin distilling, bottling and selling their own artisan liquor.
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McKinney grad named to rural affairs USDA post

June 13, 2017
 Associated Press
An Indiana native and graduate of Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law has been named to a U.S. Department of Agriculture post overseeing rural issues. U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue announced Monday that Anne Hazlett will lead the USDA's rural development agencies.
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Former Indiana justices reunite for event saluting Rucker

May 25, 2017
Olivia Covington
Members of Indiana’s legal community who have worked with now-retired Indiana Supreme Court Justice Robert Rucker gathered in Indianapolis Wednesday to celebrate the impact the long-time jurist had on the practice of law in Indiana during his quarter-century career on the appellate bench.
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57 percent of 2016 Indiana law graduates have full-time JD-required jobs

May 17, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
A little more than half of the 2016 graduates of Indiana law schools have full-time, long-term jobs where bar passage is required, according to American Bar Association employment statistics.
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IU McKinney to host ‘Salute to Justice Rucker’

May 15, 2017
IL Staff
The Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law will celebrate now-retired Indiana Supreme Court Justice Robert Rucker’s legacy in the Indiana judiciary during a special program at the law school next week.
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Sullivan to receive professionalism award for 7th Circuit

April 24, 2017
IL Staff
Former Indiana Supreme Court justice and current Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law professor Frank E. Sullivan Jr. will receive the prestigious 2017 American Inns of Court Professionalism Award for the 7th Circuit.
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Indiana Lawyer wins 2 journalism awards

April 24, 2017
IL Staff
Indiana Lawyer took home two Society of Professional Journalists Indiana Professional Chapter awards Friday.
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Indy-area attorneys hosting re-entry job fair

April 7, 2017
IL Staff
Members of Indianapolis’ legal community are offering assistance today to help recently incarcerated people find the jobs and resources they’ll need to build their future.
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David to speak at IU McKinney commencement

April 4, 2017
IL Staff
This year’s commencement ceremony at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law will feature a keynote address from Indiana Supreme Court Justice Steven David.
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Memorial service planned for late IU McKinney dean William Harvey

March 28, 2017
IL Staff
William Harvey, former dean and professor at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law, will be remembered at a special memorial service in his honor.
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Notre Dame, McKinney up, Maurer down in US News rankings

March 14, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
Although deans consistently disparage the annual rankings, the U.S. News & World Report’s 2018 Best Law Schools may have given Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law reason to cheer.
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Indiana legislators pursue legal careers after taking elected office

March 8, 2017
Olivia Covington
Being Indiana legislators inspired a handful to go to law school while working in the General Assembly.
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Former AG Holder visits IU McKinney, discusses judicial issues in America

March 3, 2017
Olivia Covington
Former United States Attorney General Eric Holder stopped by the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law on Thursday, taking questions from Indiana’s current and future attorneys and offering his perspective on some of the issues facing the nation.
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IU McKinney hosting 40th annual Women’s Caucus auction

February 20, 2017
Olivia Covington
Law students at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law are hoping to raise a record-breaking amount of money for a Hendricks County domestic violence shelter at the Women’s Caucus’ 40th annual auction this week.
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Man's conviction for 1989 rape vacated

February 1, 2017
IL Staff
A Lake Superior Court has vacated the conviction and dismissed the charges against a Gary man who was wrongly punished for a 1989 rape and served his full sentence.
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IU McKinney announces memorial for former dean

January 25, 2017
IL Staff
The Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law has announced a public memorial service to honor the life of one of its former deans.
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Young attorneys, law students prone to mental health issues

January 25, 2017
Olivia Covington
Stresses from school and adapting to one's first legal job can lead to poor health and self-medicating, but confidential assistance is available.
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ABA releases stats of classes entering in fall 2016

December 16, 2016
IL Staff
New information released from the American Bar Association underscores the differences between Indiana’s law schools.
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Dean's Desk: Community partnerships benefit IU McKinney students

December 14, 2016
Andrew Klein
At the IU McKinney School of Law, we make a special effort to support our students by partnering with advocates in the community. Allow me to share a few examples.
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IU McKinney dean emeritus dies

November 18, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
William Harvey, dean emeritus of Indiana University Robert H. McKinney and nominee to the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals died Nov. 17 after a long illness. He was 84.
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Wednesday IP lecture at IU McKinney canceled

November 14, 2016
IL Staff
A planned lecture on patents and innovation policy at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law on Wednesday has been canceled.
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USA Track & Field counsel discusses Olympic trademarks, doping rules with law students

October 21, 2016
Olivia Covington
The most important legal consideration of the Olympic Games is the protection of intellectual property – specifically, the protection of the trademarked five Olympic rings.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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