Law students

6 selected for ICLEO internships

May 18, 2015
IL Staff
Six law school students have been chosen to participate in the 2015 Carr L. Darden Conference for Legal Education Opportunity internship program.
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‘No relief’ for law school enrollment slump

February 25, 2015
Indianapolis Business Journal, J.K. Wall
After three down years for law school enrollment, Austen Parrish expected a rebound of applications and enrollment this year at Indiana University Maurer School of Law. But it isn’t happening.
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Rising cost of legal education sparked creation of ABA task force

February 25, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
At public law schools, the average tuition and fees across the country for in-state residents skyrocketed 123 percent between 2003 and 2013. Private law schools were marginally better, logging an increase of 64 percent, according to a 2014 analysis by Robert Kuehn, professor at Washington University School of Law in St. Louis.
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New class at Notre Dame gets students to think about technology’s impact

February 11, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Lawyers should not feel threatened by the new programs and websites that, in some cases, let lay people handle some of their legal issues, an attorney and legal technology entrepreneur says. In fact, the new technology actually allows lawyers to fill their true role as counselors.
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New part-time law school program launched at Indiana Tech

January 30, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana Tech Law School has started a part-time day program to allow students to obtain their J.D. in as many as seven years.
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IU McKinney creates 2 new partnerships

November 21, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law has announced another partnership to identify top undergraduates who want to pursue a legal education at the Indianapolis law school.
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Indiana law schools part of a trend to establish exchanges with China

November 19, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
In addition to the scholarly research and visiting professorships, student exchanges between China and three Indiana law schools – IU McKinney, IU Maurer and Notre Dame Law School – give students in both countries the opportunity to learn about the law of another country as well as its culture and history.
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Law firm establishes diversity fellowship at IU McKinney

October 16, 2014
IL Staff
Bose McKinney & Evans LLP has created a new diversity fellowship for first-year students at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law.
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IU Maurer to give scholarships to Purdue engineer grads

October 15, 2014
IL Staff
Indiana University Maurer School of Law announced Wednesday its third program with an in-state school to provide scholarships and mentoring to students who attend IU Maurer for law school. The school has partnered with Purdue University’s College of Engineering.
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Court announces 378 successful applicants on July bar exam

September 16, 2014
IL Staff
The list of applicants who were successful on the July Indiana bar examination is posted on the court’s website. Those who meet the other requirements of being admitted will participate in an admission ceremony Oct. 6.
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IU Maurer creates partnership with Princeton University

September 8, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana University Maurer School of Law’s effort to find and recruit well-qualified undergraduates has hit a milestone, developing a partnership with an Ivy League institution.
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Members of the Class of 2017 start law school

August 25, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
About 872 people are expected to begin their legal studies this fall at law schools in Indiana.
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Scholarship at Indiana Tech pays tribute to Abraham Lincoln

August 19, 2014
IL Staff
Indiana Tech Law School has created the endowed Sara Vaughn Gabbard Scholarship which will award two law students a scholarship for participating in and winning an annual Abraham Lincoln writing competition organized by the school.
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Processing issue delays bar exam submissions in multiple states

July 30, 2014
 Associated Press
Florida-based testing software provider ExamSoft Worldwide Inc. said a processing issue has caused delays for bar exam takers in multiple states who were submitting their answers.
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Appeals court affirms denial of post-conviction relief

July 25, 2014
Dave Stafford
A man who was represented by a law student at his guilty plea hearing and claimed he received ineffective assistance of counsel could not persuade a panel of the Indiana Court of Appeals to reverse a denial of his petition for post-conviction relief.
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IU Maurer to begin offering scholarships to Wabash College grads

July 2, 2014
IL Staff
Indiana University Maurer School of Law and Wabash College have entered into an agreement establishing a scholarship and mentorship program for Wabash students interested in going to law school.
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Starting salaries increase slightly for 2013 law grads

June 19, 2014
Jennifer Nelson
The median starting salaries for 2013 law school graduates rose slightly to nearly $62,500, according to data released by NALP Thursday. More grads also found jobs nine months out of school, but the unemployment rate rose due to the increased size of the graduating class.
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CLEO interns assigned to Court of Appeals, Tax Court

May 20, 2014
IL Staff
Eight students from three law schools have been selected for summer internships with judges of the Indiana Court of Appeals and Tax Court through the 2014 Carr L. Darden Conference for Legal Education Opportunity internship program.
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ABA committee formed to study law school cost and debt

May 6, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Former Mayor of Detroit Dennis Archer has been appointed to lead a special task force to examine the cost of legal education and the spiraling loan debt of students.
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Law graduates return home to address Class of 2014

May 6, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Alumni of Indiana law schools will be congratulating the new classes of attorneys and offering words of advice during upcoming Class of 2014 commencement ceremonies aross the state.
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Dean's Desk: IU Maurer alumni, students exemplify hard work, integrity

April 23, 2014
Austen Parrish
IU Maurer Dean Austen Parrish writes in his first Dean's Desk column about recent inductees into the school's Academy of Law Alumni Fellows and how their successes can inspire current students.
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Former editors say Law Review experience invaluable

April 9, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Outside academic institutions, law reviews are seen in a different, sometimes less flattering, light. The common complaints about publications include concerns that students are editing the articles, getting a piece published can take months, and the end product has little relevance to the practicing bar.
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Law school ranking rumble

March 26, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Law school deans protest U.S. News & World Report's "best" schools list but say they cannot ignore it because they don't want their schools to fall in the rankings.
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Indiana Tech Law School mentors bring law to life

March 12, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
A unique program at the Fort Wayne school matches students with attorneys and judges for real-world learning.
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ABA: Valpo Law enrollment surges; McKinney, ND down; Maurer ticks up

March 5, 2014
Dave Stafford
First-year law school enrollment jumped 28 percent this academic year at Valparaiso University Law School, according to data from the American Bar Association.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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