Courthouses

Lake County Court in Hammond closed due to water main break

January 23, 2015
 Associated Press
A water main break has forced the closure of the Lake County Superior Court in downtown Hammond.
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Renovation bids open for Vanderburgh County courthouse

January 21, 2015
 Associated Press
Vanderburgh County officials have begun reviewing bids for the renovation of the third floor at the 126-year-old courthouse in downtown Evansville.
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Bell damaged by 2009 courthouse fire gets new home

December 31, 2014
 Associated Press
A 150-year-old bell that survived a fire that heavily damaged a historic southern Indiana courthouse has a new home on the courthouse's lawn.
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First Amendment complaint filed against county for nativity scene

December 16, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
A nativity scene on the grounds of the Franklin County courthouse has become the subject of a federal lawsuit.
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City-County Building entrance closed for metal detector fix

October 6, 2014
IL Staff
The Marion County Sheriff’s Office will close the south public entrance to the Indianapolis City-County Building until repairs can be made to a metal detector that has been out of commission for weeks.
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Repairs underway at LaGrange County courthouse

September 17, 2014
 Associated Press
The LaGrange County courthouse is getting a face-lift. Crews from an Iowa firm that specializes in repairing aging masonry work arrived in LaGrange early Tuesday morning and started an extensive job to restore the exterior brick and stone walls of the 136-year-old county building.
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Gary courthouse fire forces shift in 2 more courts

September 2, 2014
 Associated Press
Courts officials in northwestern Indiana have relocated two more courts to other buildings following an electrical fire that damaged part of a courthouse.
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Fire closes Lake County Courthouse in Gary

August 28, 2014
 Associated Press
The Lake County commissioners say a county courthouse in Gary will likely remain closed for a week after an electrical fire.
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Judge threatens to find Indiana mayor in contempt

August 27, 2014
 Associated Press
A judge threatened to find a central Indiana mayor in contempt of court over a dispute about pipes blocking a courthouse entrance.
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Debate over historic Brown County courthouse continues

June 18, 2014
Dave Stafford
At one of the state’s most-visited tourist crossroads stands a courthouse at a crossroads of its own.
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Loss of power disrupts courts in Northern Indiana

May 16, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
A major power outage in Northern Indiana has shut down the federal courthouse in downtown South Bend.
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Indianapolis announces short list for creating justice complex

March 4, 2014
Kathleen McLaughlin
The city of Indianapolis Tuesday morning announced three development groups that will be invited to submit proposals for a new criminal justice complex.
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Official declines to rule out airport location for Criminal Justice Complex

February 3, 2014
Dave Stafford
Marion Superior judges Monday heard an update on a proposed Criminal Justice Complex, and one asked if “we can put to rest” speculation that the courts and jail would move to a site at Indianapolis International Airport.
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Preserving the past

January 15, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
County clerks, archivists and court administration work to keep historical records accessible.
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Indiana’s courthouses receive renewed attention ahead of state bicentennial

January 1, 2014
Dave Stafford
Chris Flook has an eye for Indiana’s courthouses and courthouse squares. He’s photographed all 92.
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Court affirms insurer must cover environmental cleanup costs

December 19, 2013
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed an order that an insurer pay post-notice costs of nearly $34,000 to its insured in an environmental cleanup in Mooresville.
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Judges restate: no guns in City-County Building

May 17, 2013
Dave Stafford
A 2007 order banning guns and weapons from the Indianapolis City-County Building that houses most of Marion County’s Circuit and Superior courts remains in force despite questions raised after the Indiana Legislature widely voided local gun regulations.
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Lawmakers advance bill to aid courthouse restoration, but money is missing

March 27, 2013
Dave Stafford
Nearly every county seat in Indiana could benefit from a bill promoting historic courthouse renovation and maintenance projects. Only problem is, when lawmakers passed the legislation through the Senate they stripped out the money for it.
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Will small claims court stay or will it go?

February 27, 2013
Dave Stafford
Marion County's busiest docket is at the center of a judge-trustee tug-of-war over location.
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Legislation on judicial nominating commission members moves to House

February 15, 2013
Jennifer Nelson
A bill that would require the governor to appoint nonattorney members to the Judicial Nominating Commission from a list of legislator-approved candidates passed the Senate 46-2 Thursday.
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Lawyers capture beauty of courthouses in their art

October 24, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana attorneys use photographs, paint to preserve art and history of courthouses.
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Lady Justice gets 'green' makeover

October 10, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
The greening – literally – of the rooftop of the Indianapolis federal courthouse is part of a $66.8 million upgrade of the building with funds coming from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Work on the roof along with additional upgrades to increase the energy efficiency of the facility as well as to improve the public safety system began in December 2009 and was substantially complete on Aug. 27, 2012, according to the U.S. General Services Administration.
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Federal courthouse on list for closure consideration

April 25, 2012
Michael Hoskins
The Terre Haute courthouse survived a shutdown list in 2006 by building a new facility.
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New mailing address for bankruptcy court

March 12, 2012
IL Staff
At the end of March, the United States Bankruptcy Court, Southern District of Indiana will deactivate its Indianapolis post office box.
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Liquids banned from Southern District courthouses

February 15, 2012
IL Staff
Beginning March 1, visitors to any courthouse in the Southern District of Indiana will not be permitted to bring in their own liquids or beverages. The change comes following a recommendation from the United States Marshals Service.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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