Indiana Court of Appeals

Man gets to keep part of farming property

March 17, 2016
Scott Roberts
A man will get to keep part of his farming property after the Indiana Court of Appeals found appointing a commissioner for the property was an impermissible modification of his and his ex-wife’s divorce agreement.
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Shot officer’s suit against gun dealer splits COA

March 17, 2016
Dave Stafford
An Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department Officer who was shot and wounded by a suspect he killed returning fire may proceed with his lawsuit against a gun dealer that sold the gun to a straw purchaser, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Thursday. The officer’s case is supported by law enforcement and public policy organizations.
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COA: 82-year-old can return home

March 17, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals reversed a decision by the Delaware Circuit Court that said an elderly woman needed 24-hour care supervision at a nursing facility and allowed her to return home after it found Adult Protective Services did not present sufficient evidence she was involved in a life-threatening emergency.
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COA: Attorneys can rely upon representations of other attorneys

March 16, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals reaffirmed a two-decades-old Indiana Supreme Court ruling, saying attorneys are entitled to rely upon the representations of other attorneys when it ruled on a case where a company was charged a higher price for a piece of property than it should have been because of the price the property’s attorney gave to the company.
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COA: Firm has no private cause of action to gain back fees

March 15, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals reversed a decision that denied HealthPort’s motion for judgment against Garrison Law Firm LLC after it found Garrison did not have a private cause of action under Indiana law or Administrative Code.
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Appeals court rules Notre Dame police subject to APRA

March 15, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Tuesday the University of Notre Dame Police Department is a public agency under the Indiana Access to Public Records Act and is subject to APRA requests, overturning a trial court decision in St. Joseph Superior Court.
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COA: Uninsured man can negotiate hospital bills

March 14, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals ruled in a split decision the state’s Hospital Lien Act allows an uninsured hospital patient to negotiate the terms of his contract with the hospital after a man was charged more than $600,000 for a nearly three-month stay.
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COA rules in favor of IHSAA in basketball fight

March 11, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals reversed a preliminary injunction against the Indiana High School Athletic Association in a case involving a fight between Griffith and Hammond High Schools last year that allowed both schools to participate in the IHSAA tournament. The COA said the trial court improperly added its own judgment and remanded the case to the trial court for further proceedings.
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Wife to receive more in divorce settlement

March 11, 2016
Scott Roberts
A wife will get around $116,000 more in a divorce settlement after the Indiana Court of Appeals found the trial court erred in applying the coverture fraction formula to the husband’s retirement accounts.
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COA overturns trust validity case

March 10, 2016
Scott Roberts
A redacted copy of a living trust did not stop a woman from challenging and winning her charge that a trial court improperly dismissed her complaint contesting validity of the trust.
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Woman’s self-improvement efforts not enough to change sentence

March 10, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals upheld a woman’s 36-month sentence for theft after it found the self-improvements she made were not enough to justify a lesser sentence.
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Bad publicity not enough to justify preliminary injunction

March 10, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals denied a doctor’s motion for preliminary injunction after it found he did not present enough evidence to justify it because he did not let the disciplinary process at his hospital play out.
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Denial of jury instruction was correct, COA rules

March 10, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals said a trial court was right in denying a man’s jury instruction that would have applied mens rea to every element of aggravated battery, saying the severity of an injury is not an element of prohibited conduct, but a result of it.
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Man has to pay back money despite court errors

March 9, 2016
The Indiana Court of Appeals ruled a man must pay back $19,486 he stole from another man despite court errors and the fact that the 10-year statute of limitations had expired.
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COA denies expungement after man admitted to committing crime

March 9, 2016
Scott Roberts
The fact that a man admitted to committing a crime was enough to deny expungement of his records, the Indiana Court of Appeals said, despite the fact he was not convicted of one during his expungement time period.
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COA: Anonymous tipster’s information enough for conviction

March 8, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed a man’s conviction of unlawful possession of a firearm by a serious violent felon after it found an anonymous tipster’s information constituted reasonable suspicion.
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COA: man not entitled to relief under firearms statute

March 3, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals overturned a man’s request for summary judgment after he was fired for bringing a gun to work and instead granted summary judgment to his ex-employer after it found the man was not entitled to relief under statute or common law.
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COA says town didn't defame employee after audit

February 29, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals reversed a decision denying a town summary judgment after a former employee claimed defamatory damages when the town fired her after completing an audit.
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COA affirms man not entitled to overtime pay

February 29, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed a man was not entitled to overtime pay because his contract specified as such during his employment.
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COA: Man should have met with state public defender’s office

February 29, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals reversed the grant of the state’s motion for summary denial of man’s request for post-conviction relief because his case was not forwarded to the State Public Defender’s Office.
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Court says children were endangered by public intoxication

February 29, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed a man’s conviction of public intoxication that endangers a person after he claimed he did not endanger anyone, despite being drunk and having a bow and arrow by his side.
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Appellate court filings to be put online April 1

February 29, 2016
Scott Roberts
A task force created by the Indiana Supreme Court to look into remote access and privacy of electronic records decided appellate court briefs filed by attorneys would be put online at mycase.in.gov beginning April 1.
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COA: Wood boiler cannot be used while court case is pending

February 25, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals reversed the denial of a preliminary injunction sought by a couple, finding they could stop neighbors from using an outside wood boiler during their legal action.
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COA agrees state did not interfere with defense

February 25, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed a man’s convictions for criminal confinement and domestic battery, among other charges, after it found the state did not interfere by not allowing one of the man’s witnesses to testify.
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Court finds double jeopardy in stalking case

February 24, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals reversed and remanded a man’s conviction of stalking as a Class C felony to Dearborn Superior Court because of double jeopardy violations. The court did uphold invasion of privacy charges and the revocation of his probation.
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  1. "So we broke with England for the right to "off" our preborn progeny at will, and allow the processing plant doing the dirty deeds (dirt cheap) to profit on the marketing of those "products of conception." I was completely maleducated on our nation's founding, it would seem. (But I know the ACLU is hard at work to remedy that, too.)" Well, you know, we're just following in the footsteps of our founders who raped women, raped slaves, raped children, maimed immigrants, sold children, stole property, broke promises, broke apart families, killed natives... You know, good God fearing down home Christian folk! :/

  2. Who gives a rats behind about all the fluffy ranking nonsense. What students having to pay off debt need to know is that all schools aren't created equal and students from many schools don't have a snowball's chance of getting a decent paying job straight out of law school. Their lowly ranked lawschool won't tell them that though. When schools start honestly (accurately) reporting *those numbers, things will get interesting real quick, and the looks on student's faces will be priceless!

  3. Whilst it may be true that Judges and Justices enjoy such freedom of time and effort, it certainly does not hold true for the average working person. To say that one must 1) take a day or a half day off work every 3 months, 2) gather a list of information including recent photographs, and 3) set up a time that is convenient for the local sheriff or other such office to complete the registry is more than a bit near-sighted. This may be procedural, and hence, in the near-sighted minds of the court, not 'punishment,' but it is in fact 'punishment.' The local sheriffs probably feel a little punished too by the overwork. Registries serve to punish the offender whilst simultaneously providing the public at large with a false sense of security. The false sense of security is dangerous to the public who may not exercise due diligence by thinking there are no offenders in their locale. In fact, the registry only informs them of those who have been convicted.

  4. Unfortunately, the court doesn't understand the difference between ebidta and adjusted ebidta as they clearly got the ruling wrong based on their misunderstanding

  5. A common refrain in the comments on this website comes from people who cannot locate attorneys willing put justice over retainers. At the same time the judiciary threatens to make pro bono work mandatory, seemingly noting the same concern. But what happens to attorneys who have the chumptzah to threatened the legal status quo in Indiana? Ask Gary Welch, ask Paul Ogden, ask me. Speak truth to power, suffer horrendously accordingly. No wonder Hoosier attorneys who want to keep in good graces merely chase the dollars ... the powers that be have no concerns as to those who are ever for sale to the highest bidder ... for those even willing to compromise for $$$ never allow either justice or constitutionality to cause them to stand up to injustice or unconstitutionality. And the bad apples in the Hoosier barrel, like this one, just keep rotting.

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