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County official wants review of new ethics leader

June 9, 2010
Michael Hoskins
A Dearborn County commissioner alleges the county’s former attorney has wrongly accused two officials of violating federal law and has asked the Indiana Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission to launch an investigation of its soon-to-be leader who starts in that office June 21.
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Indiana Judges Association: Choose between the good and the good

June 9, 2010
David Dreyer
Judge David J. Dreyer urges the governor to appoint a Notre Dame Law School alum.
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Disciplinary Actions - 6/9

June 9, 2010
IL Staff
Indiana Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission actions from the June 9 Indiana Lawyer.
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Senate votes on federal magistrate's nomination

June 9, 2010
Michael HoskinsMore

Justices order new trial based on traffic judge's conduct

June 9, 2010
Michael Hoskins
The Indiana Supreme Court has set the stage for a judicial disciplinary action against a Marion County Traffic Court judge for his courtroom conduct on a speeding and suspended license case last year.
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Indiana law schools mark graduations

June 9, 2010
IL Staff
All four Indiana law schools had commencement ceremonies in May recognizing more than 800 graduates around the state.
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Editorial: Hunt for victims' rights

May 26, 2010
Editorial Indiana Lawyer

Here at the newspaper, we’re big fans of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution. But we understand the need for and exuberance some individuals feel for the Second Amendment: “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.”

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Debate swirls around citations, use of the NFP

May 26, 2010
Michael Hoskins
Envision a world in which lawyers successfully defended a client on what all parties thought was a significant legal issue, but future attorneys couldn't use that case result to help persuade judges in their litigation.
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Indiana Scouts proud of their own

May 26, 2010
Michael Hoskins
A small paperweight sits on attorney Terry White’s desk in Evansville, reminding him of an organization and motto that’s been a central part of his life since childhood. No matter the issue he faces in the legal world or in his personal life, he knows that he can always find guidance in the phrase close to his heart.
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Racing for legal aid

May 26, 2010
IL Staff
Racers raise money for Legal Aid Centre of Eldoret.
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International jurist visits Indiana

May 26, 2010
IL Staff
The president of the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia in The Hague was recently honored in Indiana.
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Attorneys say ruling confuses discovery regarding expert materials

May 26, 2010
Michael Hoskins
A liability lawsuit filed by the victims of a water-heater explosion a year after the May 2004 blast has erupted in its own metaphorical explosion of discovery disputes.
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Students benefit from internship experiences

May 26, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
Sometimes a seemingly small gesture can turn into something bigger. Or at least that’s the thinking with various so-called pipeline programs aimed at high school and college students with a goal of increasing diversity in the legal field.
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ICLEO initiative gets national attention from rising fellows

May 26, 2010
Michael Hoskins
When he was named to the Madison Circuit bench late last year, Judge Rudolph “Rudy” Pyle III made history in that he became not only the county’s first African-American jurist but also the first Indiana Conference for Legal Education Opportunities graduate to be elevated to the state’s judiciary at that level.
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Predicting IOLTA fund revenues

May 26, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
All that is known about funding for Indiana’s 14 pro bono districts is that no one yet knows exactly how much the districts will receive in October for their 2011 budgets.
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Uninsured motorist coverage claim

May 26, 2010
Michael Dec Jr. and Pamela M. Dec v. Encompass Insurance
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Fees updated for appellate courts

May 12, 2010
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court published an order April 26 on the fees the state's appellate courts clerk can charge for miscellaneous services.
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DOC to use DNA to fight contraband

May 12, 2010
IL Staff
The Indiana Department of Correction will use technology to analyze DNA samples from prison contraband, thanks to a pilot project believed to be the first of its kind in the U.S.
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We the People team 8th in nation

May 12, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
High school students who represented Indiana at the 23rd annual We the People congressional hearing competition placed eighth among the teams competing on the national level in Washington, D.C., April 22-27.
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Disciplinary Actions - 5/12

May 12, 2010
The Indiana Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission brings charges against attorneys who have violated the state's rules for admission to the bar and Rules of Professional Conduct.
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Lawyers manage restaurants, legal work in Evansville, Fort Wayne, Indianapolis

May 12, 2010
Rebecca Berfanger
Usually being served by a lawyer is a bad thing. That is, unless the lawyer is offering a cool martini or a warm plate of shrimp and grits.
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In-house attorney at Remy uses engineer experience in legal work

May 12, 2010
Michael Hoskins
Being an attorney wasn't always the plan for Jeremiah J. Shives, in-house counsel for Pendleton-based Remy International.
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Lawyer teaches safety on construction sites

May 12, 2010
Michael Hoskins
On an occasional Saturday, you may find attorney John Daly teaching a workplace safety course in front of construction workers.
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Exploring e-discovery in federal courts

May 12, 2010
Michael Hoskins
The first year of a federal e-discovery program is now complete in the 7th Circuit, and despite its success one clear message sets the stage for how the pilot project moves forward: More Indiana judges and attorneys need to step up and get involved.
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East Chicago-casino settlement up in air

May 12, 2010
Michael Hoskins
A Marion Superior Judge declined to immediately decide on the state's request to set aside a partial settlement in a dispute about East Chicago casino revenues.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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