Supreme Court of the United States

Supreme Court turns away GM appeal over ignition switches

April 24, 2017
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States on Monday turned away an appeal from General Motors Co. seeking to block dozens of lawsuits over faulty ignition switches that one plaintiffs' attorney said could expose the company to billions of dollars in additional claims.
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Justices: Colorado policy on court fees unconstitutional

April 20, 2017
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States ruled Wednesday that Colorado's practice of not automatically refunding court fees and other costs to people convicted of crimes but later exonerated violates the Constitution.
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Playground case touches on separation of church and state

April 19, 2017
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States signaled Wednesday that it will decide an important case on the separation of church and state in favor of a Missouri church that wants state money to put a soft surface on its preschool playground.
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SCOTUS to hear church-state case

April 17, 2017
 Associated Press
Justice Neil Gorsuch's first week on the U.S. Supreme Court bench features an important case about the separation of church and state that has its roots on a Midwestern church playground. The outcome could make it easier to use state money to pay for private, religious schooling in many states.
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US Supreme Court rejects bid by detained asylum seekers

April 17, 2017
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States has rejected an appeal from detained immigrant mothers and their children who claim they will be persecuted if they are returned to their Latin American homelands.
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Gorsuch asks his first questions from Supreme Court bench

April 17, 2017
 Associated Press
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch wasn't shy Monday about making his voice heard as he took his seat on the bench for the first time to hear arguments.
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Cases, but also cafeteria duty, await Gorsuch at high court

April 11, 2017
 Associated Press
How do you keep a new Supreme Court justice's head from getting too big?
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Gorsuch sworn into Supreme Court, vows to serve Constitution

April 10, 2017
 Associated Press
President Donald Trump praised new Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch during a White House swearing-in ceremony on Monday as a jurist who will rule "not on his personal preferences but based on a fair and objective reading of the law."
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Gorsuch may be decisive vote in divisive Supreme Court cases

April 7, 2017
 Associated Press
With Neil Gorsuch's confirmation as the 113th Supreme Court justice on Friday, it won't be long before he starts revealing what he really thinks about a range of hot topics he repeatedly sidestepped during his confirmation hearing.
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Senate 'goes nuclear' for Gorsuch confirmation vote

April 6, 2017
 Associated Press
The Senate has voted to “go nuclear” and eliminate the filibuster for President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee and future court picks. The change dubbed “the nuclear option” came Thursday on a procedural motion and removes a 60-vote filibuster requirement for Neil Gorsuch. The Senate is expected to confirm the appellate court judge on Friday to fill a vacancy created by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia.
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Bitter accusations ahead of Senate Supreme Court showdown

April 6, 2017
 Associated Press
Lawmakers traded bitter accusations on the Senate floor Thursday ahead of showdown votes over President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Neil Gorsuch, that could change the Senate and the court for generations.
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High court may re-examine Civil Rights Act after LGBT ruling

April 6, 2017
 Associated Press
A ruling by the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago in and Indiana case reopens the question of whether the 1964 Civil Rights Act’s protections apply to LGBT workers in the same way they bar discrimination based on someone’s race, religion or national origin.
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Gorsuch plagiarism allegations involve Indiana source

April 5, 2017
 Associated Press, IL Staff
Reports that Neil Gorsuch may have plagiarized legal writings, including one from an Indiana lawyer, broke late Tuesday, adding to the Washington drama over President Donald Trump’s nominee to the United States Supreme Court.
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Political group takes ‘robocall’ law challenge to SCOTUS

April 4, 2017
Dave Stafford
A political advocacy group that wants to strike down Indiana’s ban on robocalls has asked the Supreme Court of the United States to overturn the state law it calls the most restrictive in the nation.
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Amid accusations, Senate heads for showdown on Gorsuch

April 4, 2017
 Associated Press
Republican and Democratic senators exchanged bitter accusations Tuesday as they headed toward an explosive confrontation over President Donald Trump's U.S. Supreme Court nominee that could change the Senate, and the court, for generations.
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Senate panel favorably recommends Gorsuch for Supreme Court

April 3, 2017
 Associated Press
A deeply divided Senate panel favorably recommended U.S. Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch on Monday, sending the nomination to the full Senate for what is expected to be a partisan showdown — and eventual confirmation.
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US Supreme Court rejects bid to revive ballot selfies ban

April 3, 2017
 Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected New Hampshire's bid to revive a law prohibiting voters from taking selfies pictures with their completed ballots.
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Donnelly supports Gorsuch nomination to Supreme Court

April 3, 2017
 Associated Press
Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly says he'll support the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court.
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Democratic Supreme Court opposition grows; Schumer warns GOP

March 31, 2017
 Associated Press
Senate Democratic opposition to Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee swelled Friday as Democrats neared the numbers needed to block Judge Neil Gorsuch with a filibuster.
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Sales of Polar Pure brings forfeiture dispute to US Supreme Court

March 28, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
The Supreme Court of the United States will enter the debate over civil forfeiture Wednesday when the eight justices consider whether the government can seize property from a convicted co-conspirator who did not receive any of the profits from the criminal transactions.
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High court struggles over hospital pension dispute

March 27, 2017
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States is struggling over whether some of the nation's largest hospitals should be allowed to sidestep federal laws protecting pension benefits for workers.
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Democrats force 1-week delay on panel vote on Supreme Court pick

March 27, 2017
 Associated Press
Senate Democrats on Monday forced a one-week delay in a committee vote on President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, who remains on track for confirmation with solid Republican backing.
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SCOTUS takes securities-fraud clash involving Indiana pensions

March 27, 2017
 Bloomberg News
The U.S. Supreme Court agreed to use a case stemming from a New York City contract fraud to clarify investors’ ability to sue companies for omitting information from shareholder reports. Investors led by the Indiana Public Retirement System urged the Supreme Court not to take up the dispute.
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Democrats oppose Gorsuch, say he rules against workers

March 24, 2017
 Associated Press
Two additional Democrats said Friday that they will vote against U.s. Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch and will support a filibuster against him.
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Democratic leader Schumer vows filibuster of Gorsuch nomination

March 23, 2017
 Associated Press
The top Senate Democrat said Thursday he will oppose President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee and lead a filibuster of the choice, setting up a politically charged showdown with Republicans with far-reaching implications for future judicial nominees.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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