Supreme Court of the United States

IU, Purdue file amicus in university admissions case

November 4, 2015
IL Staff
Indiana University and Purdue University have joined with six public universities in filing an amicus brief in support of the University of Texas and its diversity-related admissions policies, which are being considered by the Supreme Court of the United States in Fisher v. University of Texas.
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Supreme Court justices hint they may limit consumer lawsuits

November 3, 2015
 Bloomberg News
A divided Supreme Court of the United States indicated it may put limits on consumer lawsuits, questioning arguments by a man seeking to sue over what he says is an error-riddled Internet profile.
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SCOTUS to hear law student's redistricting case

November 3, 2015
 Associated Press
Two things set first-year law student Stephen Shapiro apart from his classmates at American University in Washington. At 55, he’s old enough to be a father to most of his classmates. And on Wednesday, a lawsuit he filed will be heard by the Supreme Court of the United States.
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Supreme Court troubled by DA's rejection of black jurors

November 3, 2015
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States appears troubled by the actions of a Georgia prosecutor in disqualifying all the black prospective jurors from the death penalty trial of a black teenager who was accused of killing an elderly white woman.
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Lower court ruling stands in S&P ratings case

November 2, 2015
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States won't hear an appeal from shareholders who claim the Standard & Poor's ratings firm made false statements about its ratings of risky mortgage investments that helped trigger the financial crisis.
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SCOTUS won't accept appeal in anti-gay defamation verdict

November 2, 2015
 Associated Press
The  Supreme Court of the United States Monday rejected an appeal from a former lawyer for the state of Michigan who lost a defamation lawsuit filed by a gay student at the University of Michigan.
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High court won't hear appeal over use of Bob Marley's image

November 2, 2015
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States Monday rejected an appeal from clothing companies that claim they have legal rights to sell shirts with the image of reggae icon Bob Marley.
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Alito to visit Notre Dame Law School next month

October 28, 2015
IL Staff
Supreme Court of the United States Associate Justice Samuel Alito Jr. will visit the University of Notre Dame Nov. 18 and 19, where he will meet with law students and participate in a discussion on Italian constitutional justice.
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Attorney general wants SCOTUS to reinstate death penalty

October 27, 2015
IL Staff
Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller announced Tuesday that he is asking the Supreme Court of the United States to reinstate the death penalty for Tommy R. Pruitt, who was convicted in the 2001 murder of a Morgan County sheriff’s deputy.
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Damages dispute against Zimmer Biomet subsidiary headed to SCOTUS

October 20, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
A wholly owned subsidiary of Zimmer Biomet in Warsaw, Indiana, will be arguing it should not have to pay about $248 million in a patent infringement case scheduled to be heard by the Supreme Court of the United States.
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Supreme Court could weigh in on student debt battle

October 20, 2015
 Bloomberg News
Mark Tetzlaff is a 57-year-old recovering alcoholic who has been convicted of victim intimidation and domestic abuse. He may also be the person with the best shot at upending the way U.S. courts treat student debt for bankrupt borrowers.
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SCOTUS won't reinstate $250K award in police shooting

October 19, 2015
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States will not reinstate a $250,000 award to the father of a suspected marijuana user in Maryland who was killed by police in a middle-of the-night raid.
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SCOTUS hear arguments over life sentences for teenagers

October 13, 2015
 Associated Press
People serving life terms for murders they committed as teenagers were looking to the Supreme Court of the United States Tuesday for signals about whether they will have a chance to seek their freedom.
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Cleveland appeals 'jock tax' ruling to US Supreme Court

October 7, 2015
 Associated Press
The city of Cleveland says it is within its rights to tax visiting professional athletes based on the number of games they play a year because taxation is a matter of local jurisdiction.
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Familiar, divisive social issues on Supreme Court agenda

October 5, 2015
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States' new term began Monday with no cross words between the justices, although a steady stream of divisive social issues awaits them in the coming months.
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SCOTUS turns away 1,600 cases as new term opens

October 5, 2015
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States opened its new term on Monday by turning away appeals in roughly 1,600 cases the justices reviewed over the summer. As is typical, the justices did not comment in rejecting the cases.
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Sotomayor draws admirers at Notre Dame

September 9, 2015
Dave Stafford
Sharing candid, deeply personal experiences, Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor inspired an overflow crowd Sept. 2 at the University of Notre Dame. She held court for nearly two hours, answering questions from Notre Dame alumna, trustee and NBC News reporter Anne Thompson.
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Clerk defying gay marriage orders: ‘A heaven or hell decision’

September 2, 2015
 Associated Press
Now as the Rowan County clerk in Morehead, Kentucky, Kim Davis is refusing to surrender in a battle over who can and can’t be wed. She invoked “God's authority” Tuesday as she defied a series of federal court orders and once again denied marriage licenses to same-sex couples.
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Federal judge orders defiant Kentucky clerk, staff to court

September 1, 2015
 Associated Press
A county clerk in Kentucky who has invoked “God's authority” and is defying the Supreme Court of the United States by refusing to license same-sex marriage has been summoned along with her entire staff to explain to a federal judge why she should not face stiff fines or jail time.
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Kentucky clerk defies court order to issue gay-marriage license

August 27, 2015
 Associated Press
The clerk's office in Moorehead, Kentucky, on Thursday again refused to issue a marriage license to a gay couple, in defiance of a Supreme Court of the United States ruling that legalized same-sex marriage across the country two months ago.
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Supreme Court Justice Sotomayor will appear at Notre Dame

August 12, 2015
 Associated Press
Supreme Court of the United States Justice Sonia Sotomayor will take part in a moderated discussion at the University of Notre Dame in September.
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Next same-sex marriage fight could center on benefits

July 15, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
In Indiana, some large companies have expanded their domestic partner benefit packages to include same- and opposite-sex couples.
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The ACA lives on: Supreme Court maintains the status quo

July 15, 2015
Tara Sciscoe, Christopher Sears
Like a cat with nine lives, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has survived its second trip to the U.S. Supreme Court.
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US to make marriage benefits available to gay couples

July 9, 2015
 Associated Press
Attorney General Loretta Lynch says the government will make federal marriage benefits available to same-sex couples following a Supreme Court of the United States decision last month that legalized same-sex marriage.
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GPS search after fatal crash unconstitutional, COA holds

July 7, 2015
Dave Stafford
The warrantless search of a driver's global positioning system after a crash in which a passenger died was unconstitutional, the Indiana Court of Appeals held Tuesday.
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  1. "So we broke with England for the right to "off" our preborn progeny at will, and allow the processing plant doing the dirty deeds (dirt cheap) to profit on the marketing of those "products of conception." I was completely maleducated on our nation's founding, it would seem. (But I know the ACLU is hard at work to remedy that, too.)" Well, you know, we're just following in the footsteps of our founders who raped women, raped slaves, raped children, maimed immigrants, sold children, stole property, broke promises, broke apart families, killed natives... You know, good God fearing down home Christian folk! :/

  2. Who gives a rats behind about all the fluffy ranking nonsense. What students having to pay off debt need to know is that all schools aren't created equal and students from many schools don't have a snowball's chance of getting a decent paying job straight out of law school. Their lowly ranked lawschool won't tell them that though. When schools start honestly (accurately) reporting *those numbers, things will get interesting real quick, and the looks on student's faces will be priceless!

  3. Whilst it may be true that Judges and Justices enjoy such freedom of time and effort, it certainly does not hold true for the average working person. To say that one must 1) take a day or a half day off work every 3 months, 2) gather a list of information including recent photographs, and 3) set up a time that is convenient for the local sheriff or other such office to complete the registry is more than a bit near-sighted. This may be procedural, and hence, in the near-sighted minds of the court, not 'punishment,' but it is in fact 'punishment.' The local sheriffs probably feel a little punished too by the overwork. Registries serve to punish the offender whilst simultaneously providing the public at large with a false sense of security. The false sense of security is dangerous to the public who may not exercise due diligence by thinking there are no offenders in their locale. In fact, the registry only informs them of those who have been convicted.

  4. Unfortunately, the court doesn't understand the difference between ebidta and adjusted ebidta as they clearly got the ruling wrong based on their misunderstanding

  5. A common refrain in the comments on this website comes from people who cannot locate attorneys willing put justice over retainers. At the same time the judiciary threatens to make pro bono work mandatory, seemingly noting the same concern. But what happens to attorneys who have the chumptzah to threatened the legal status quo in Indiana? Ask Gary Welch, ask Paul Ogden, ask me. Speak truth to power, suffer horrendously accordingly. No wonder Hoosier attorneys who want to keep in good graces merely chase the dollars ... the powers that be have no concerns as to those who are ever for sale to the highest bidder ... for those even willing to compromise for $$$ never allow either justice or constitutionality to cause them to stand up to injustice or unconstitutionality. And the bad apples in the Hoosier barrel, like this one, just keep rotting.

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