Supreme Court of the United States

COA says voter I.D. law unconstitutional

September 17, 2009
Michael Hoskins
The Indiana Court of Appeals has tossed out the state's 4-year-old voter identification law as unconstitutional, bringing new attention to a statute that has been upheld by the nation's highest court.
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Indiana funds want SCOTUS review

September 4, 2009
Michael Hoskins
Three Indiana pension and construction funds are asking the Supreme Court of the United States to reconsider their objections to the Chrysler bankruptcy proceedings that earlier this year resulted in the sale of most of the American automaker's assets to an Italian company.
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Judges disagree on search validity

August 31, 2009
Jennifer Nelson
On remand from the Supreme Court of the United States to reconsider under a recent ruling, the Indiana Court of Appeals reaffirmed the forfeiture of a woman's car following the arrest of her son for driving while suspended. One judge dissented because she believes the search of the vehicle was unreasonable in light of the recent ruling.
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SCOTUS: Elected judges must step aside

June 8, 2009
Michael Hoskins
Elected judges must recuse themselves in cases where large campaign contributions from interested parties create an appearance of bias, the nation's highest court ruled today.
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SCOTUS denies Indiana wine case

May 18, 2009
Michael Hoskins
The Supreme Court of the United States won't consider whether Indiana's wine shipping law is constitutional by requiring in-person contact before any direct delivery is allowed.
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Reports: Justice to retire; speculation begins

May 1, 2009
Jennifer Nelson
Reports broke late Thursday that a Supreme Court of the United States justice plans to retire from the bench but which justice may surprise some.
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Former justice discusses merit selection

April 22, 2009
Michael Hoskins
During a visit to South Bend today, former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor pushed a message that merit selection is the best way to ensure an independent judiciary, though her words come at a time when state lawmakers are close to scrapping that very system in the county she visited.
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Annual 7th Circuit meeting in Indy

April 21, 2009
IL Staff
United States Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens and Rev. David Link, Dean Emeritus of the University of Notre Dame School of Law, are just two of the speakers at this year's Judicial Conference of the 7th Circuit and the annual meeting of the 7th Circuit Bar Association in Indianapolis.
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SCOTUS denies cert in Indiana case

March 23, 2009
Michael Hoskins
The nation's highest court has declined to take an Indiana case asking whether a prisoner suing under the Prison Litigation Reform Act has the right to a jury trial on any debatable factual issue relating to a failure to exhaust administrative remedies.
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High court rules on self-representation issue

March 17, 2009
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Supreme Court affirmed a trial court's ruling that a defendant who was competent enough to stand trial wasn't competent to represent himself at trial, an issue on remand from the Supreme Court of the United States.
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SCOTUS: Plaintiffs can sue drug companies

March 5, 2009
Michael Hoskins
The U.S. Supreme Court says pharmaceutical companies can be sued in state court over alleged drug effects, even if the Food and Drug Administration has approved the medication and its warning label.
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SCOTUS asked to take Indiana wine case

February 9, 2009
Michael Hoskins
The Supreme Court of the United States is being asked to consider the constitutionality of Indiana's wine shipping law, which requires in-person contact before any direct delivery is allowed.
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SCOTUS: Lab techs must testify

January 1, 2009
Michael Hoskins
A decision today from the Supreme Court of the United States will have an immediate impact on Indiana, where state justices are considering at least two cases about whether lab technicians who've tested evidence in a case must appear on the stand.
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SCOTUS urged to not take Indiana case

January 1, 2009
Michael Hoskins
The Indiana Attorney General's Office wants the nation's top jurists to reject a Hoosier case posing Fourth Amendment questions about police searches, valid search warrants, and probable cause.
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Committed woman's charge must be dismissed

December 18, 2008
Jennifer Nelson
Faced with a question the U. S. Supreme Court declined to address more than 35 years ago, the Indiana Supreme Court affirmed a trial court's decision to dismiss a criminal charge against a committed woman who may never be able to stand trial because of incompetence.
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Federalist society to preview SCOTUS term

October 14, 2008
IL Staff
The Federalist Society's Indianapolis Lawyers Division Chapter will present a preview of the upcoming U.S. Supreme Court 2008-09 term featuring Kannon Shanmugam, who served as assistant to the solicitor general in the U.S. Department of Justice and is currently a partner in the Washington, D.C., firm Williams & Connolly.
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Event to focus on election, U.S. Supreme Court

September 23, 2008
IL Staff
University of Notre Dame Law School professor Richard Garnett is the featured speaker at an event discussing the upcoming presidential election and its impact on the nation's highest court.
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U.S. Chief Justice visits Notre Dame

September 12, 2008
Jennifer Nelson
The chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court visited students at the Notre Dame Law School this morning for a one-day appointment to the James J. Clynes Visiting Chair at the school.
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Voter ID questions remain after SCOTUS ruling

May 14, 2008
Michael Hoskins
The primary election in Indiana has come and gone. Voters had to show photo identification, the same as in other recent elections, but it was the first since the nation's highest court upheld the almost three-year-old state statute requiring specific ID at the polls.
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ACLU wants SCOTUS to hear Indiana voter ID case

May 17, 2007
Michael Hoskins
The Supreme Court of the United States is now being asked to weigh in on Indiana's two-year-old voter identification law.
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  1. Bill Satterlee is, indeed, a true jazz aficionado. Part of my legal career was spent as an associate attorney with Hoeppner, Wagner & Evans in Valparaiso. Bill was instrumental (no pun intended) in introducing me to jazz music, thereby fostering my love for this genre. We would, occasionally, travel to Chicago on weekends and sit in on some outstanding jazz sessions at Andy's on Hubbard Street. Had it not been for Bill's love of jazz music, I never would have had the good fortune of hearing it played live at Andy's. And, most likely, I might never have begun listening to it as much as I do. Thanks, Bill.

  2. The child support award is many times what the custodial parent earns, and exceeds the actual costs of providing for the children's needs. My fiance and I have agreed that if we divorce, that the children will be provided for using a shared checking account like this one(http://www.mediate.com/articles/if_they_can_do_parenting_plans.cfm) to avoid the hidden alimony in Indiana's child support guidelines.

  3. Fiat justitia ruat caelum is a Latin legal phrase, meaning "Let justice be done though the heavens fall." The maxim signifies the belief that justice must be realized regardless of consequences.

  4. Indiana up holds this behavior. the state police know they got it made.

  5. Additional Points: -Civility in the profession: Treating others with respect will not only move others to respect you, it will show a shared respect for the legal system we are all sworn to protect. When attorneys engage in unnecessary personal attacks, they lose the respect and favor of judges, jurors, the person being attacked, and others witnessing or reading the communication. It's not always easy to put anger aside, but if you don't, you will lose respect, credibility, cases, clients & jobs or job opportunities. -Read Rule 22 of the Admission & Discipline Rules. Capture that spirit and apply those principles in your daily work. -Strive to represent clients in a manner that communicates the importance you place on the legal matter you're privileged to handle for them. -There are good lawyers of all ages, but no one is perfect. Older lawyers can learn valuable skills from younger lawyers who tend to be more adept with new technologies that can improve work quality and speed. Older lawyers have already tackled more legal issues and worked through more of the problems encountered when representing clients on various types of legal matters. If there's mutual respect and a willingness to learn from each other, it will help make both attorneys better lawyers. -Erosion of the public trust in lawyers wears down public confidence in the rule of law. Always keep your duty to the profession in mind. -You can learn so much by asking questions & actively listening to instructions and advice from more experienced attorneys, regardless of how many years or decades you've each practiced law. Don't miss out on that chance.

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