Intellectual Property

Congratulations, your genius patent is now a military secret

June 8, 2016
 Bloomberg News
Just a handful of people find themselves in Jim Geer’s position, forbidden by the government from pursuing ideas laid out in patent applications due to national-security concerns.
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Merck’s patent win over Gilead reversed over false testimony

June 7, 2016
 Bloomberg News
Merck & Co.’s $200 million jury verdict against Gilead Sciences Inc. was voided in a patent dispute over a breakthrough for hepatitis C because of misconduct by a witness at the companies’ trial.
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Gilead judge re-opens case amid claim Merck scientist lied

May 2, 2016
 Bloomberg News
A federal judge re-opened Merck & Co.’s patent case against Gilead Sciences Inc. over a hepatitis C drug amid claims that an ex-Merck scientist lied to a jury that awarded the company $200 million in damages.
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Davee: Initial trademark considerations when advising clients

April 20, 2016
When helping the client form their business, there are several items that should be discussed early on, particularly if the client has any desire to pursue federal trademark registration.
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Indiana patent law delaying demand letters

April 20, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
While the passage of House Enrolled Act 1102 has not been met with a lot of noise, it is causing attorneys to think twice before sending a letter asserting patent infringement. Lawyers now have to consider the requirements of patent laws that have bloomed in many states and the potential ramifications of being found in violation.
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Nguyen: Is Circuit jurisdictional battle judicial wisdom or patent envy?

April 20, 2016
Having legitimate grounds to hear cases involving patent issues comes with a responsibility that regional circuits must address.
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Bloomington startup cultivates patents for novel way to garden

April 20, 2016
Dave Stafford
The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on March 29 issued a design patent for the Garden Tower 2, and other patents are pending for an invention that allows up to 50 plants to grow in a compact space that would fit on the most modest apartment patio.
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Judge clears ‘Stairway to Heaven’ copyright case for trial

April 13, 2016
 Associated Press
A trial is needed to determine if Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven” copies its opening notes from a song performed by the rock band Spirit, a federal judge has ruled.
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High court won’t hear appeal in NFL video game lawsuit

March 21, 2016
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States is staying out of a dispute between game maker Electronic Arts Inc. and former National Football League players who accuse the company of using their likenesses in the popular Madden NFL video game series without approval.
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Indiana company brings Jesse Owens to the big screen

March 9, 2016
Scott Roberts
An Indiana company that handles intellectual property rights had a big role in telling the story of one of the most influential track athletes of all time through a recently released movie.
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High court rejects appeal in Batmobile copyright case

March 7, 2016
 Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court is staying out of a copyright dispute involving a California man who produced replicas of the Batmobile for car-collecting fans of the caped crusader.
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High court won't hear appeal over NFL player settlement

February 29, 2016
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States turned away an appeal from three former NFL players who challenged a $42 million settlement between the league and nearly 25,000 former players over the NFL's use of player images in film footage.
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Indiana manufacturer’s ‘willful infringement’ suit set for SCOTUS argument

February 22, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana medical device maker Zimmer Inc. will be fighting for its wallet Tuesday as part of a patent dispute before the Supreme Court of the United States.
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Publisher to pay $14M in 'Happy Birthday' copyright case

February 9, 2016
 Associated Press
Music publisher Warner/Chappell Music will return $14 million in fees to settle a lawsuit that challenges its claim to "Happy Birthday," one of the world's best-known songs.
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Caterpillar loses $74.6M verdict over trade secret theft

December 22, 2015
Caterpillar Inc. was ordered by a jury to pay $74.6 million for theft of trade secrets from a British maker of earth-moving equipment.
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Patent reform law withstanding challenges

December 16, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
A battle between two tech companies put a key provision of the recent patent reform law on the firing line. But intellectual property attorneys were not surprised the patent holder attempted to knock out the administrative review process or that the attempt failed.
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Schantz: Infringing IP in your home with 3-D printing

December 16, 2015
Adherence to a few principles will avoid many of the intellectual property potholes on the road of 3-D printing.
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Warr: Cybersecurity lessons learned from an ostrich

December 16, 2015
When the topic of cybersecurity arises, many companies react by burying their heads in the sand. However, playing an ostrich when it comes to cybersecurity will not save you.
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Nguyen: Banking on intellecutal property

December 16, 2015
What do startups and high-growth companies have in common? Intellectual property is their most valuable asset, separating one company from the others in a fiercely competitive tech environment.
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Class-action status granted in athletic scholarship lawsuits

December 8, 2015
 Associated Press
Class-action status has been granted by a federal judge in two lawsuits against the NCAA that claim scholarships illegally cap compensation to college athletes.
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Michael Jordan, Jewel-Osco reach settlement over use of name

November 23, 2015
 Associated Press
Spokespeople for Michael Jordan and a supermarket chain say there's a settlement regarding the alleged misuse of the basketball star's name.
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High court won't hear appeal over use of Bob Marley's image

November 2, 2015
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States Monday rejected an appeal from clothing companies that claim they have legal rights to sell shirts with the image of reggae icon Bob Marley.
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FanDuel sued by former Colt over use of name, image

November 2, 2015
 Bloomberg News
Fantasy-sports gaming site FanDuel Inc. has been sued by former Indianapolis Colts receiver Pierre Garcon over the use of his name and image, which he claims was done without his permission.
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Water flavorings lawsuit may mean end of gravy train in Texas

October 28, 2015
 Bloomberg News
Could a fight over flavoring water mean the end of a court district that’s become notorious for its patent litigation? It might, if Heartland Consumer Products Holdings LLC is successful in getting a patent-infringement lawsuit filed against it last year by Kraft Heinz Co. in Delaware moved to a court in its home state of Indiana.
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Damages dispute against Zimmer Biomet subsidiary headed to SCOTUS

October 20, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
A wholly owned subsidiary of Zimmer Biomet in Warsaw, Indiana, will be arguing it should not have to pay about $248 million in a patent infringement case scheduled to be heard by the Supreme Court of the United States.
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  1. He TIL team,please zap this comment too since it was merely marking a scammer and not reflecting on the story. Thanks, happy Monday, keep up the fine work.

  2. You just need my social security number sent to your Gmail account to process then loan, right? Beware scammers indeed.

  3. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

  4. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  5. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

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