Litigation

Stevenson: Plane crash litigation may improve travel safety

July 31, 2013
Modern airliners are filled with technology that has made flying safer than ever. According to MIT statistics professor Arnold Barnett, in the last five years, the death rate for airline passengers in the United States has been one in 45 million flights. At that rate, a passenger could fly daily for an average of 123,000 years before being involved in a fatal crash. While technology such as GPS and auto-landing systems has minimized the chance for human error, especially in poor-visibility landing conditions, there is a drawback. Asiana Flight 214 is likely to become a prime example of how technology can actually cause aviation disasters instead of preventing them. Flight 214’s collision with the seawall just short of the runway at San Francisco International Airport demonstrates what can happen when technology does not work as intended.
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7th Circuit orders Indiana case sent back to Ohio

May 23, 2013
Jennifer Nelson
A federal judge in the Southern District of Indiana erred when she determined that a claims adjuster from Ohio was fraudulently joined to a case that was transferred out of federal court in Ohio to Indiana, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled. The case also presented two issues of first impression for the Circuit.
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Social media sleuths find evidence, but admissibility requires authentication

May 8, 2013
Dave Stafford
What happens on Facebook stays on Facebook – forever – and attorneys conceivably run into risk if they fail to investigate pertinent posts, a judge suggested during a presentation about social media evidence.
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Taking them at their word

May 8, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
The work of interpreters is exhausting, but vital to protecting individual rights.
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Maley: Updated series is valuable for practitioners

February 27, 2013
John Maley
As the practice has moved from law-firm libraries to online research on laptops and iPads, there remains a place for comprehensive, in-depth and practical treatises and practice guides. Since 1998, Westlaw’s Business and Commercial Litigation in Federal Courts has been just such a valuable resource.
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Badger: Using arbitration clauses to reduce potential liability risk

January 16, 2013
Steven Badger
In the first part of this column, I outlined the advantages and disadvantages of arbitration as an alternative to litigation in court and concluded that neither arbitration nor litigation is preferable in all situations. This second part provides more specific suggestions on when to use arbitration in certain high-risk, “bet-the-company” situations.
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Badger: To arbitrate or litigate, that is the question

January 2, 2013
Steven Badger
In my world of dispute resolution, one of the most basic questions is whether a particular business dispute should be resolved in arbitration or in a court of law. Like many of the questions I am frequently asked by clients, there is no simple answer that fits all occasions and situations.
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Attorneys discover predictive coding

October 10, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
In the world of searching for relevant documents in the recesses of email inboxes and hard drives, a new high-tech tool has appeared that, despite causing trepidation among some attorneys, will likely become commonly used during the discovery process to tame the growing volumes of data.
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Nordstrom: Book offers little insight for experienced trial attorneys

October 10, 2012
Rodney Nordstrom
Rodney Nordstrom reviews "Winning the Jury's Attention: Presenting Evidence from Voir Dire to Closing."
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Book Review: 'Performance on Trial: The Case for Better Entertainment'

July 18, 2012
Rodney Nordstrom
Litigation consultant Rodney Nordstrom reviews the book: 'Performance on Trial: The Case for Better Entertainment; by Joseph Curcillo III.
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Settlement documentaries can be persuasive tool

July 18, 2012
Dave Stafford
Carolyn Dudley’s husband, Indiana State Trooper Gary Dudley, was killed six years ago when he was struck by a freight truck during a charity bike ride in Vermillion County. A short video about his life, and the event that caused his death, was critical to winning a settlement in a wrongful death case against the trucking company.
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Judges find mortgage company not culpably negligent

May 24, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
In a dispute over which mortgage has priority in a foreclosure action, the Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed summary judgment for the senior mortgage holder. The judges found the doctrine of equitable subrogation applies.
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Column: Practical and legal differences of class and mass actions

May 23, 2012
Scott Starr and Mario Massillamany write about what to consider when decided whether to file a class- or mass-action case.
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A 21st century expression of the law

May 23, 2012
Dave Stafford
The 'emoticon defense' raises brows, but it puts a focus on speech rights and school threats.
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Dressing defendants

May 23, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Attorneys say image and attire may influence jurors.
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Plaintiffs fail to prove claim that Zimmer misrepresented information

May 21, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Two pension funds that own shares of Zimmer Holdings Inc. were unable to prove that Zimmer defrauded its investors by suppressing information, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled.
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Justices to decide case questioning health care costs charged to uninsured patients

May 7, 2012
IL Staff
Indiana’s high court will hear arguments Thursday in Allen v. Clarian Health Partners, Inc., 955 N.E.2d 804 (Ind. Ct. App. 2011), vacated.
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Court properly preserved home habitability claim

February 27, 2012
Michael Hoskins
The Indiana Court of Appeals has found that a Clark County case can continue involving claims against a home construction company. The former homeowners allege that the company defectively built their home and that mold and water damage occurred, leading to loss of habitability.
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Litigation training in short supply

February 1, 2012
Michael Hoskins
Fewer jury trials leave young lawyers looking for experience outside of court.
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Expert's voice carries weight

February 1, 2012
Michael Hoskins
Indiana Court of Appeals finds single expert can establish standard of care for legal malpractice.
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Judge rules on summary judgment motions in IBM case

January 26, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
The State of Indiana may be on the hook to pay IBM $40 million in subcontractor assignment fees per the contract it had with IBM to update the state’s welfare system, a contract the state cancelled in October 2009 because it wasn’t happy with results.
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7th Circuit cautions against 'ostrich-like' advocacy

November 23, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Warning appellate lawyers not to ignore precedent, a 7th Circuit Court of Appeals decision today issues a short but clear message to not use “ostrich-like” tactics when briefing and arguing cases.
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7th Circuit decides MDL appeal question

November 18, 2011
Michael Hoskins

The 7th Circuit Court of Appeal wants each federal judge handling multi-district litigation to have the flexibility to choose between sending parts of unresolved cases back to the original courts or keep those in one jurisdiction, once a final district-level decision has been made and the time for appeal arrives.

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Supreme Court to hear Affordable Care Act challenges

November 14, 2011
Michael Hoskins
In what’s expected to be a historic constitutional test over how much power the federal government has to require individual mandates for states, the Supreme Court of the United States will consider the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act passed in 2010.
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Indiana State Fair tragedy renews cap debate

October 12, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Indiana attorneys and legislators are embarking on a broader discussion about the state’s current tort claim cap and whether that decades-old limit is adequate to address the scope of this situation.
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  1. On a related note, I offered the ICLU my cases against the BLE repeatedly, and sought their amici aid repeatedly as well. Crickets. Usually not even a response. I am guessing they do not do allegations of anti-Christian bias? No matter how glaring? I have posted on other links the amicus brief that did get filed (search this ezine, e.g., Kansas attorney), read the Thomas More Society brief to note what the ACLU ran from like vampires from garlic. An Examiner pledged to advance diversity and inclusion came right out on the record and demanded that I choose Man's law or God's law. I wonder, had I been asked to swear off Allah ... what result then, ICLU? Had I been found of bad character and fitness for advocating sexual deviance, what result then ICLU? Had I been lifetime banned for posting left of center statements denigrating the US Constitution, what result ICLU? Hey, we all know don't we? Rather Biased.

  2. It was mentioned in the article that there have been numerous CLE events to train attorneys on e-filing. I would like someone to provide a list of those events, because I have not seen any such events in east central Indiana, and since Hamilton County is one of the counties where e-filing is mandatory, one would expect some instruction in this area. Come on, people, give some instruction, not just applause!

  3. This law is troubling in two respects: First, why wasn't the law reviewed "with the intention of getting all the facts surrounding the legislation and its actual impact on the marketplace" BEFORE it was passed and signed? Seems a bit backwards to me (even acknowledging that this is the Indiana state legislature we're talking about. Second, what is it with the laws in this state that seem to create artificial monopolies in various industries? Besides this one, the other law that comes to mind is the legislation that governed the granting of licenses to firms that wanted to set up craft distilleries. The licensing was limited to only those entities that were already in the craft beer brewing business. Republicans in this state talk a big game when it comes to being "business friendly". They're friendly alright . . . to certain businesses.

  4. Gretchen, Asia, Roberto, Tonia, Shannon, Cheri, Nicholas, Sondra, Carey, Laura ... my heart breaks for you, reaching out in a forum in which you are ignored by a professional suffering through both compassion fatigue and the love of filthy lucre. Most if not all of you seek a warm blooded Hoosier attorney unafraid to take on the government and plead that government officials have acted unconstitutionally to try to save a family and/or rescue children in need and/or press individual rights against the Leviathan state. I know an attorney from Kansas who has taken such cases across the country, arguing before half of the federal courts of appeal and presenting cases to the US S.Ct. numerous times seeking cert. Unfortunately, due to his zeal for the constitutional rights of peasants and willingness to confront powerful government bureaucrats seemingly violating the same ... he was denied character and fitness certification to join the Indiana bar, even after he was cleared to sit for, and passed, both the bar exam and ethics exam. And was even admitted to the Indiana federal bar! NOW KNOW THIS .... you will face headwinds and difficulties in locating a zealously motivated Hoosier attorney to face off against powerful government agents who violate the constitution, for those who do so tend to end up as marginalized as Paul Odgen, who was driven from the profession. So beware, many are mere expensive lapdogs, the kind of breed who will gladly take a large retainer, but then fail to press against the status quo and powers that be when told to heel to. It is a common belief among some in Indiana that those attorneys who truly fight the power and rigorously confront corruption often end up, actually or metaphorically, in real life or at least as to their careers, as dead as the late, great Gary Welch. All of that said, I wish you the very best in finding a Hoosier attorney with a fighting spirit to press your rights as far as you can, for you do have rights against government actors, no matter what said actors may tell you otherwise. Attorneys outside the elitist camp are often better fighters that those owing the powers that be for their salaries, corner offices and end of year bonuses. So do not be afraid to retain a green horn or unconnected lawyer, many of them are fine men and woman who are yet untainted by the "unique" Hoosier system.

  5. I am not the John below. He is a journalist and talk show host who knows me through my years working in Kansas government. I did no ask John to post the note below ...

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