Litigation

Noyes: A short phone call can change the dynamic of a case

May 7, 2014
Jon Noyes encourages attorneys to network in order to gain insight and litigation strategies.
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Foos: Microsoft Surface Pro for the mobile attorney

May 7, 2014
Robert Foos Jr. writes about how the Microsoft Surface Pro caught his eye as an alternative to the Apple iPad.
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Technology levels the legal playing field

November 6, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Attorneys find hardware and software make them more effective and efficient.
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Stevenson: Plane crash litigation may improve travel safety

July 31, 2013
Modern airliners are filled with technology that has made flying safer than ever. According to MIT statistics professor Arnold Barnett, in the last five years, the death rate for airline passengers in the United States has been one in 45 million flights. At that rate, a passenger could fly daily for an average of 123,000 years before being involved in a fatal crash. While technology such as GPS and auto-landing systems has minimized the chance for human error, especially in poor-visibility landing conditions, there is a drawback. Asiana Flight 214 is likely to become a prime example of how technology can actually cause aviation disasters instead of preventing them. Flight 214’s collision with the seawall just short of the runway at San Francisco International Airport demonstrates what can happen when technology does not work as intended.
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7th Circuit orders Indiana case sent back to Ohio

May 23, 2013
Jennifer Nelson
A federal judge in the Southern District of Indiana erred when she determined that a claims adjuster from Ohio was fraudulently joined to a case that was transferred out of federal court in Ohio to Indiana, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled. The case also presented two issues of first impression for the Circuit.
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Social media sleuths find evidence, but admissibility requires authentication

May 8, 2013
Dave Stafford
What happens on Facebook stays on Facebook – forever – and attorneys conceivably run into risk if they fail to investigate pertinent posts, a judge suggested during a presentation about social media evidence.
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Taking them at their word

May 8, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
The work of interpreters is exhausting, but vital to protecting individual rights.
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Maley: Updated series is valuable for practitioners

February 27, 2013
John Maley
As the practice has moved from law-firm libraries to online research on laptops and iPads, there remains a place for comprehensive, in-depth and practical treatises and practice guides. Since 1998, Westlaw’s Business and Commercial Litigation in Federal Courts has been just such a valuable resource.
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Badger: Using arbitration clauses to reduce potential liability risk

January 16, 2013
Steven Badger
In the first part of this column, I outlined the advantages and disadvantages of arbitration as an alternative to litigation in court and concluded that neither arbitration nor litigation is preferable in all situations. This second part provides more specific suggestions on when to use arbitration in certain high-risk, “bet-the-company” situations.
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Badger: To arbitrate or litigate, that is the question

January 2, 2013
Steven Badger
In my world of dispute resolution, one of the most basic questions is whether a particular business dispute should be resolved in arbitration or in a court of law. Like many of the questions I am frequently asked by clients, there is no simple answer that fits all occasions and situations.
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Attorneys discover predictive coding

October 10, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
In the world of searching for relevant documents in the recesses of email inboxes and hard drives, a new high-tech tool has appeared that, despite causing trepidation among some attorneys, will likely become commonly used during the discovery process to tame the growing volumes of data.
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Nordstrom: Book offers little insight for experienced trial attorneys

October 10, 2012
Rodney Nordstrom
Rodney Nordstrom reviews "Winning the Jury's Attention: Presenting Evidence from Voir Dire to Closing."
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Book Review: 'Performance on Trial: The Case for Better Entertainment'

July 18, 2012
Rodney Nordstrom
Litigation consultant Rodney Nordstrom reviews the book: 'Performance on Trial: The Case for Better Entertainment; by Joseph Curcillo III.
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Settlement documentaries can be persuasive tool

July 18, 2012
Dave Stafford
Carolyn Dudley’s husband, Indiana State Trooper Gary Dudley, was killed six years ago when he was struck by a freight truck during a charity bike ride in Vermillion County. A short video about his life, and the event that caused his death, was critical to winning a settlement in a wrongful death case against the trucking company.
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Judges find mortgage company not culpably negligent

May 24, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
In a dispute over which mortgage has priority in a foreclosure action, the Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed summary judgment for the senior mortgage holder. The judges found the doctrine of equitable subrogation applies.
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Column: Practical and legal differences of class and mass actions

May 23, 2012
Scott Starr and Mario Massillamany write about what to consider when decided whether to file a class- or mass-action case.
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A 21st century expression of the law

May 23, 2012
Dave Stafford
The 'emoticon defense' raises brows, but it puts a focus on speech rights and school threats.
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Dressing defendants

May 23, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Attorneys say image and attire may influence jurors.
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Plaintiffs fail to prove claim that Zimmer misrepresented information

May 21, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Two pension funds that own shares of Zimmer Holdings Inc. were unable to prove that Zimmer defrauded its investors by suppressing information, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled.
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Justices to decide case questioning health care costs charged to uninsured patients

May 7, 2012
IL Staff
Indiana’s high court will hear arguments Thursday in Allen v. Clarian Health Partners, Inc., 955 N.E.2d 804 (Ind. Ct. App. 2011), vacated.
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Court properly preserved home habitability claim

February 27, 2012
Michael Hoskins
The Indiana Court of Appeals has found that a Clark County case can continue involving claims against a home construction company. The former homeowners allege that the company defectively built their home and that mold and water damage occurred, leading to loss of habitability.
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Litigation training in short supply

February 1, 2012
Michael Hoskins
Fewer jury trials leave young lawyers looking for experience outside of court.
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Expert's voice carries weight

February 1, 2012
Michael Hoskins
Indiana Court of Appeals finds single expert can establish standard of care for legal malpractice.
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Judge rules on summary judgment motions in IBM case

January 26, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
The State of Indiana may be on the hook to pay IBM $40 million in subcontractor assignment fees per the contract it had with IBM to update the state’s welfare system, a contract the state cancelled in October 2009 because it wasn’t happy with results.
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7th Circuit cautions against 'ostrich-like' advocacy

November 23, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Warning appellate lawyers not to ignore precedent, a 7th Circuit Court of Appeals decision today issues a short but clear message to not use “ostrich-like” tactics when briefing and arguing cases.
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  1. Indianapolis employers harassment among minorities AFRICAN Americans needs to be discussed the metro Indianapolis area is horrible when it comes to harassing African American employees especially in the local healthcare facilities. Racially profiling in the workplace is an major issue. Please make it better because I'm many civil rights leaders would come here and justify that Indiana is a state the WORKS only applies to Caucasian Americans especially in Hamilton county. Indiana targets African Americans in the workplace so when governor pence is trying to convince people to vote for him this would be awesome publicity for the Presidency Elections.

  2. Wishing Mary Willis only God's best, and superhuman strength, as she attempts to right a ship that too often strays far off course. May she never suffer this personal affect, as some do who attempt to change a broken system: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QojajMsd2nE

  3. Indiana's seatbelt law is not punishable as a crime. It is an infraction. Apparently some of our Circuit judges have deemed settled law inapplicable if it fails to fit their litmus test of political correctness. Extrapolating to redefine terms of behavior in a violation of immigration law to the entire body of criminal law leaves a smorgasbord of opportunity for judicial mischief.

  4. I wonder if $10 diversions for failure to wear seat belts are considered moral turpitude in federal immigration law like they are under Indiana law? Anyone know?

  5. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

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