Legal News

Confidential informant testimony did not hinder defense

December 6, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
A man who was arrested after a confidential informant arranged drug buys was not hindered by the fact that the informant testified at trial anonymously, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled.
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COA finds no error in juvenile adjudication

December 6, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
The Indiana Court of Appeals has affirmed a juvenile court’s decision to place a minor in a residential treatment center, holding sufficient evidence exists to support the court’s dispositional order.
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Environmental groups merge

December 5, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
The Legal Environmental Aid Foundation and The Hoosier Environmental Council announced that the two not-for-profits have merged and will continue operations as the Hoosier Environmental Council.
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Justices accept 2 appeals and deny 24 cases

December 5, 2011
Michael Hoskins
The Indiana Supreme Court has accepted two cases, one involving a tax revenue assessment dispute and a second asking how trial judges decide on restraining defendants who disrupt courtroom proceedings.
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Photos admissible when evidence has been destroyed

December 5, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
In an appeal from a man convicted of Class B dealing in methamphetamine and Class B misdemeanor visiting a common nuisance, the Indiana Court of Appeals has held that photos of a methamphetamine lab were admissible because the physical evidence had been destroyed.
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COA sides with appellant in probation violation complaint

December 5, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
The Indiana Court of Appeals has held that when a probation is transferred between Indiana counties, the receiving county assumes supervisory authority over the case.
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Third volume of Restatement of Property published

December 2, 2011
IL Staff
Attorneys and judges now have more scholarly guidance on wills and other donation-related issues in civil law, after a national organization released its third and final volume of the Restatement (Third) of Property: Wills and Other Donative Transfers.
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Former city-county councilor sentenced to 40 months

December 2, 2011
IL and IBJ Staff
U.S. Senior Judge Larry McKinney on Thursday sentenced former Indianapolis City-County Councilor Lincoln Plowman to 40 months in federal prison for attempted extortion and bribery.
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Jasper County high school students to observe Court of Appeals oral argument

December 2, 2011
IL Staff
The Indiana Court of Appeals will hear arguments in Paul K. Ogden v. Robertson et. al. at 2 p.m. EST Dec. 6 at Rensselaer Central High School, 1106 E. Grace St.
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Law school renamed following gift from Indianapolis attorney

December 1, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
After a $24 million donation from an Indianapolis attorney, Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis is now named Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law.
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Indy law renamed in honor of $24 million donor

December 1, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
Effective today, the Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis will be called Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law.
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7th Circuit affirms ruling against woman kicked out of public housing

December 1, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
A woman who challenged the Housing Authority of South Bend’s decision to terminate her lease for federally subsidized public housing because of criminal activity lost her appeal before the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals.
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Appellate court upholds criminal recklessness conviction

December 1, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Court of Appeals determined there was sufficient evidence to uphold a man’s conviction of criminal recklessness regarding his firing of a gun.
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Court seeks comment on changes to civil local rules

December 1, 2011
IL Staff
The U.S. District Court, Southern District of Indiana, is seeking comment on proposed amendments to dozens of its local rules. If adopted, the amendments will become effective Jan. 1, 2012.
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Technical issues interrupt COA webcasts

November 30, 2011
IL Staff
The Indiana Court of Appeals will not have any webcast videos, and potentially no audio, for at least several days, the court announced Wednesday.
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'Inextricably intertwined' exception appropriate under state constitution

November 30, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that under Article 1, Section 13 of the Indiana Constitution, the right to counsel is violated only where a different offense is inextricably intertwined with the charge on which counsel is already representing the defendant.
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Judges find ex post facto claim waived

November 30, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
The man who raised a constitutional challenge to the propriety of his conviction of failing to register as a sex offender waived his ex post facto claim when he entered into a plea agreement, the Indiana Court of Appeals held Wednesday.
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Changes to federal courts effective Thursday

November 30, 2011
IL Staff
Several changes are coming to the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Indiana and the U.S. District Court in the Northern District of Indiana Thursday.
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Application process open for federal defense panel

November 30, 2011
IL Staff
The United States District Court for the Southern District of Indiana is accepting applications from attorneys interested in serving on the court’s Criminal Justice Act panel for the Indianapolis and Terre Haute divisions.
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Majority reverses Hopper advisement created last year

November 29, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
A divided Indiana Supreme Court has reversed its 2010 decision to require pro se defendants be informed about the dangers of pleading guilty without an attorney. Two of the justices who originally voted to create the “Hopper advisement” found themselves in the minority on the high court’s decision on rehearing.
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Marion County judge admonished for fundraising flyer

November 29, 2011
Michael Hoskins
The Indiana Commission on Judicial Qualifications has admonished a Marion Superior judge for mailing a questionable re-election fundraising flyer that it says put the judiciary in a negative light and implied that justice is for sale.
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COA addresses impact of guilty pleas on immigration status

November 28, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed the denial of a man’s petitions for post-conviction relief, finding his attorneys’ failure to advise him of adverse immigration consequences of pleading guilty did not prejudice his defense.
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Appellate judges travel to Indianapolis high school

November 28, 2011
IL Staff
The Indiana Court of Appeals will hear arguments in Christopher Bryant v. State of Indiana Tuesday at Lawrence North High School in Indianapolis.
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Judge grants limited class certification in stage collapse lawsuit

November 28, 2011
Michael Hoskins
While she said she doubts the plaintiffs can win their case, U.S. Judge Sarah Evans Barker is allowing limited class certification in a lawsuit challenging the state’s $5 million damage liability cap. Plaintiffs incurred injuries in the Indiana State Fair stage collapse Aug. 13.
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7th Circuit cautions against 'ostrich-like' advocacy

November 23, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Warning appellate lawyers not to ignore precedent, a 7th Circuit Court of Appeals decision today issues a short but clear message to not use “ostrich-like” tactics when briefing and arguing cases.
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  1. People have heard of Magna Carta, and not the Provisions of Oxford & Westminster. Not that anybody really cares. Today, it might be considered ethnic or racial bias to talk about the "Anglo Saxon common law." I don't even see the word English in the blurb above. Anyhow speaking of Edward I-- he was famously intolerant of diversity himself viz the Edict of Expulsion 1290. So all he did too like making parliament a permanent institution-- that all must be discredited. 100 years from now such commemorations will be in the dustbin of history.

  2. Oops, I meant discipline, not disciple. Interesting that those words share such a close relationship. We attorneys are to be disciples of the law, being disciplined to serve the law and its source, the constitutions. Do that, and the goals of Magna Carta are advanced. Do that not and Magna Carta is usurped. Do that not and you should be disciplined. Do that and you should be counted a good disciple. My experiences, once again, do not reveal a process that is adhering to the due process ideals of Magna Carta. Just the opposite, in fact. Braveheart's dying rebel (for a great cause) yell comes to mind.

  3. It is not a sign of the times that many Ind licensed attorneys (I am not) would fear writing what I wrote below, even if they had experiences to back it up. Let's take a minute to thank God for the brave Baron's who risked death by torture to tell the government that it was in the wrong. Today is a career ruination that whistleblowers risk. That is often brought on by denial of licenses or disciple for those who dare speak truth to power. Magna Carta says truth rules power, power too often claims that truth matters not, only Power. Fight such power for the good of our constitutional republics. If we lose them we have only bureaucratic tyranny to pass onto our children. Government attorneys, of all lawyers, should best realize this and work to see our patrimony preserved. I am now a government attorney (once again) in Kansas, and respecting the rule of law is my passion, first and foremost.

  4. I have dealt with more than a few I-465 moat-protected government attorneys and even judges who just cannot seem to wrap their heads around the core of this 800 year old document. I guess monarchial privileges and powers corrupt still ..... from an academic website on this fantastic "treaty" between the King and the people ... "Enduring Principles of Liberty Magna Carta was written by a group of 13th-century barons to protect their rights and property against a tyrannical king. There are two principles expressed in Magna Carta that resonate to this day: "No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned, disseised, outlawed, banished, or in any way destroyed, nor will We proceed against or prosecute him, except by the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land." "To no one will We sell, to no one will We deny or delay, right or justice." Inspiration for Americans During the American Revolution, Magna Carta served to inspire and justify action in liberty’s defense. The colonists believed they were entitled to the same rights as Englishmen, rights guaranteed in Magna Carta. They embedded those rights into the laws of their states and later into the Constitution and Bill of Rights. The Fifth Amendment to the Constitution ("no person shall . . . be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.") is a direct descendent of Magna Carta's guarantee of proceedings according to the "law of the land." http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/magna_carta/

  5. I'm not sure what's more depressing: the fact that people would pay $35,000 per year to attend an unaccredited law school, or the fact that the same people "are hanging in there and willing to follow the dean’s lead in going forward" after the same school fails to gain accreditation, rendering their $70,000 and counting education worthless. Maybe it's a good thing these people can't sit for the bar.

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