U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Indiana

Government shutdown would have little impact on federal legal system

April 8, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Even if the U.S. Congress fails to pass a short-term budget measure and prevent a government shutdown before midnight Friday, the various arms of the Indiana federal legal community will remain operating mostly as usual – at least for the time being.
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Respected leaders in U.S. Attorney's Office for Southern District retire

March 30, 2011
Michael Hoskins
Two longtime leaders in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District are retiring this month, taking with them more than a half century of combined legal experience.
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2 U.S. attorneys retiring, replacements named

March 16, 2011
Jennifer Nelson
Joseph H. Hogsett, U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Indiana, has announced replacements for the two members of the office’s management team who are retiring next month.
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Hogsett takes his oath as U.S. attorney

March 2, 2011
IL Staff
U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Indiana Joseph H. Hogsett took his official oath of office on Feb. 18 before a crowd of more than 200 members of the state’s legal community as well as U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder. The investiture ceremony was held at the Indiana Repertory Theatre in Indianapolis.
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7th Circuit judge to speak at Black History event

January 24, 2011
IL Staff
7th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Ann Claire Williams will be the featured speaker at an event celebrating Black History Month hosted by the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana.
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Senate confirms Indy lawyer as new U.S. Attorney

September 30, 2010
Michael Hoskins
An Indianapolis lawyer has gotten approval to become the next U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Indiana, ending a three-year gap since last time a U.S. Senate confirmed leader held that post.
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Hogsett confirmed as U.S. Attorney

September 30, 2010
Michael Hoskins
Indianapolis attorney Joe Hogsett has gotten approval from the full Senate to be the next U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Indiana.
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Senate panel OKs Indy attorney for U.S. Attorney

September 16, 2010
Michael Hoskins
An Indianapolis attorney has gotten the approval of a key congressional judiciary panel to become the new U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Indiana.
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Senate panel to consider Indy lawyer for U.S. Attorney

September 14, 2010
Michael Hoskins
A key Congressional judiciary panel is scheduled to decide this week whether the nomination of an Indianapolis attorney for U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Indiana should proceed to the full Senate for a vote.
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Hogsett tapped for U.S. Attorney post

July 21, 2010
Michael Hoskins
When Indianapolis attorney Joe Hogsett received the news that he’d been tapped by President Barack Obama to be the next U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Indiana, one of his first thoughts was that this could be the next home run in his career.
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Indy attorney Joe Hogsett tapped for U.S. Attorney post

July 15, 2010
Michael Hoskins
When Indianapolis attorney Joe Hogsett received the news Wednesday that he’d been chosen by President Barack Obama to be the next U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Indiana, he wasn’t in court or handling a client’s legal matters.
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President nominates Joe Hogsett for U.S. Attorney

July 14, 2010
Michael Hoskins
The White House has chosen Bingham McHale partner Joe Hogsett to be the next U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Indiana.
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Officer's work with victims recognized

May 6, 2010
IL Staff
U.S. Attorney Timothy M. Morrison in the Southern District of Indiana gave Cumberland Police Officer Jimmy Laws the 2010 United States Attorney's Carol S. Morris Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Rights of Victims on May 5.
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Democrat stalwart said to be U.S. attorney nominee

March 19, 2010
Scott Olson
The U.S. Attorney's Office in Southern District of Indiana has been without a presidentially appointed U.S. attorney for more than two years - an extraordinarily long stretch for a position that usually can be filled in half that time.
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Former foreclosure lawyer charged with fraud

October 9, 2009
Michael Hoskins
The U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Indiana has filed mail fraud charges against a former Indianapolis attorney who resigned from the bar two years ago.
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  1. I have dealt with more than a few I-465 moat-protected government attorneys and even judges who just cannot seem to wrap their heads around the core of this 800 year old document. I guess monarchial privileges and powers corrupt still ..... from an academic website on this fantastic "treaty" between the King and the people ... "Enduring Principles of Liberty Magna Carta was written by a group of 13th-century barons to protect their rights and property against a tyrannical king. There are two principles expressed in Magna Carta that resonate to this day: "No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned, disseised, outlawed, banished, or in any way destroyed, nor will We proceed against or prosecute him, except by the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land." "To no one will We sell, to no one will We deny or delay, right or justice." Inspiration for Americans During the American Revolution, Magna Carta served to inspire and justify action in liberty’s defense. The colonists believed they were entitled to the same rights as Englishmen, rights guaranteed in Magna Carta. They embedded those rights into the laws of their states and later into the Constitution and Bill of Rights. The Fifth Amendment to the Constitution ("no person shall . . . be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.") is a direct descendent of Magna Carta's guarantee of proceedings according to the "law of the land." http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/magna_carta/

  2. I'm not sure what's more depressing: the fact that people would pay $35,000 per year to attend an unaccredited law school, or the fact that the same people "are hanging in there and willing to follow the dean’s lead in going forward" after the same school fails to gain accreditation, rendering their $70,000 and counting education worthless. Maybe it's a good thing these people can't sit for the bar.

  3. Such is not uncommon on law school startups. Students and faculty should tap Bruce Green, city attorney of Lufkin, Texas. He led a group of studnets and faculty and sued the ABA as a law student. He knows the ropes, has advised other law school startups. Very astute and principled attorney of unpopular clients, at least in his past, before Lufkin tapped him to run their show.

  4. Not that having the appellate records on Odyssey won't be welcome or useful, but I would rather they first bring in the stray counties that aren't yet connected on the trial court level.

  5. Aristotle said 350 bc: "The most hated sort, and with the greatest reason, is usury, which makes a gain out of money itself, and not from the natural object of it. For money was intended to be used in exchange, but not to increase at interest. And this term interest, which means the birth of money from money, is applied to the breeding of money because the offspring resembles the parent. Wherefore of an modes of getting wealth this is the most unnatural.

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