Opinions March 10, 2016

March 10, 2016
Indiana Court of Appeals
Tricia A. Davis Williams v. State of Indiana
Criminal. Affirms Tricia A. Davis Williams’ sentencing order after she pleaded guilty to one count of Class D felony theft. Her placement in the Department of Correction is not inappropriate.

Opinions March 9, 2016

March 9, 2016
Indiana Court of Appeals
David Lee Marshall v. State of Indiana
Criminal. Affirms the denial of David Lee Marshall’s petition for expungement, holding the trial court could properly find, based upon Marshall’s own admission, that he had committed a crime in the relevant time period and was not entitled to the requested relief. 

Opinions March 8, 2016

March 8, 2016
Indiana Court of Appeals
Tyrone Grayson v. State of Indiana

Criminal. Affirms Tyrone Grayson’s conviction of Class B felony unlawful possession of a firearm by a serious violent felon. An anonymous tip was sufficient probable cause for police to stop Grayson’s vehicle, where a handgun was found in plain sight.

Opinions March 7, 2016

March 7, 2016
Indiana Tax Court

Nick Popovich v Ind. Dept. of State Revenue
Awards Nick Popovich $24,963 for successfully prosecuting his first motion to compel.


Opinions March 4, 2016

March 4, 2016
7th Circuit Court of Appeals
Aduwali Abdukhadir Muse v. Charles A. Daniels, Warden, FCI Terre Haute
Civil. Affirms denial of writ of habeas corpus because Muse waived the right to challenge his guilty plea based on his age when he pleaded guilty.

Opinions March 3, 2016

March 3, 2016
Indiana Court of Appeals
Caterpillar Inc. v. William Sudlow
Civil tort. Reverses and remands summary judgment for William Sudlow in favor of Caterpillar Inc. after it found Sudlow is not entitled to relief under statute or common law. Sudlow was a Caterpillar employee who was fired after another employee observed a partially visible gun in his vehicle in the Caterpillar parking lot.

Opinions March 2, 2016

March 2, 2016
Indiana Supreme Court
Ashonta Kenya Jackson v. State of Indiana
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Class C felony corrupt business influence, holding that Indiana’s Racketeer Influenced and Criminal Organizations Act does not contain a continuity element, but rather a requirement that the pattern of crimes are “not isolated.” The evidence was sufficient to show the underlying robberies Jackson was convicted of were not isolated. Remands for revision of the sentencing order to indicate which offense was enhanced by the habitual offender adjudication.

Opinions March 1, 2016

March 1, 2016
Indiana Supreme Court
Austin Blaize v State of Indiana
Life without parole. Affirms convictions of murder, burglary and other charges and Austin Blaize’s sentence of life without parole and a term of years. Comments made by the judge to the jury do not require reversal and a new trial.

Opinions Feb. 29, 2016

February 29, 2016
Indiana Court of Appeals
Edward Skillman v. Ivy Tech Community College
Civil plenary. Affirms summary judgment for Ivy Tech on Skillman’s claim under the Indiana Wage Payment Act. Ivy Tech is not an “employer” for purposes of the Indiana Minimum Wage Law because it is “subject to” federal Fair Labor Standards Ac requirements, even if Skillman cannot personally enforce FLSA requirements against Ivy Tech.

Opinions Feb. 26, 2016

February 26, 2016
Indiana Court of Appeals
Timothy L. Coats v. State of Indiana (mem. dec.)
Criminal. Affirms conviction of Level 6 felony resisting law enforcement.

Opinions Feb. 25, 2016

February 25, 2016
Indiana Court of Appeals
John H. Hill v. State of Indiana
Criminal. Affirms John Hill’s convictions of criminal confinement, a Class C felony, domestic battery, a Class D felony, domestic battery, a Class A misdemeanor and interference with the reporting of a crime, a Class A misdemeanor.  The state did not interfere with his defense by moving to exclude the testimony of a witness.

Opinions Feb. 24, 2016

February 24, 2016
Indiana Court of Appeals
Billy Luke v. State of Indiana
Criminal. Affirms Billy Luke’s convictions for invasion of privacy as Class D felonies and the revocation of his probation. Remands with instructions to vacate Luke’s conviction for stalking as a Class C felony because of a double jeopardy violation.

Opinions Feb. 23, 2016

February 23, 2016
7th Circuit Court of Appeals
Kathy Ann Stark v. Carolyn W. Colvin

US District Court, Northern District of Indiana, Fort Wayne Division
Joseph S. Van Bokkelen, Judge.
Civil. Remands denial of disability insurance benefits to Social Security Administration, finding the administrative law judge applied flawed analyses to deny Stark’s claim.

Opinions Feb. 22, 2016

February 22, 2016
The following 7th Circuit Court of Appeals opinion was issued after IL deadline Friday.

USA vs. Lon Campbell
US District Court, Southern District of Indiana, Indianapolis Division
Tonya Walton Pratt, Judge.
Criminal. Dismisses appeal of Campbell’s sentence of 21 months in prison followed by three years of supervised release because he waived his right to appeal in district court.


Opinions Feb. 18, 2016

February 18, 2016
Indiana Court of Appeals
David W. Gerth v. State of Indiana
Criminal. Reverses David Gerth’s convictions for Class C felony dealing in marijuana and Class D felony maintaining a common nuisance.


Opinions Feb. 17, 2016

February 17, 2016
7th Circuit Court of Appeals
In Re: Biglari Holdings Inc. Shareholder Derivative Litigation. Chad Taylor and Edward Donahue v. Sardar Biglari
U.S. District Court, Southern District of Indiana, Indianapolis Division. Judge Sarah Evans Barker.
Civil. Affirms ruling there was no demand futility in three transactions which sold holdings to Biglari Holdings CEO Sardar Biglari.

Opinions Feb. 16, 2016

February 16, 2016
Indiana Supreme Court
Tom Bonnell v. Ruby A. Cotner, Douglas Wayne Cotner, Arthur J. Johnson, Jimmy J. Johnson, and Jerry L. Johnson
Civil plenary. Affirms denial of the Cotners’ adverse possession claim and reverses the grant of a prescriptive easement, finding that the sale of the 35-foot-wide strip of land by tax deed extinguished any and all interest the Cotners previously possessed.

Opinions Feb. 15, 2016

February 15, 2016
Indiana Court of Appeals
Takesha Lashawn Sanders v. State of Indiana (mem. dec.)
Criminal. Affirms conviction of guilty but mentally ill of murder after a jury trial.


Opinions Feb. 12, 2016

February 12, 2016
Indiana Court of Appeals
David J. and Susan L. MacFadyen v. City of Angola, City of Angola Plan Commission, and Trine University, Inc.

Civil tort. Affirms decision by the Angola Plan Commission to vacate a portion of an alley on Trine University property near the MacFadyens’ property. The MacFadyens did not show they were aggrieved by the vacation.

Opinions Feb. 10, 2016

February 10, 2016
Indiana Court of Appeals
Thomas A. Ambrose II v. Dalton Construction, Inc.

Civil collection. Clarifies on rehearing that there is a statutory requirement that modifications to a home improvement contract must be in writing, notwithstanding the language in Sees v. Bank One, Ind., N.A., 839, N.E.2d 154, 161 (Ind. 2005). But this does not change the result of the case and affirms denial of Ambrose’s motion for summary judgment and the entry of final judgment in favor of Dalton Construction on its complaint to foreclose a mechanic’s lien.

Opinions Feb. 9, 2016

February 9, 2016
7th Circuit Court of Appeals
Debbie A. Stage v. Carolyn W. Colvin, Acting Commissioner of Social Security
U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Indiana, Hammond Division. Judge Joseph Van Bokklelen.
Civil. Vacates the denial of Stage’s application for supplemental security income, disability insurance benefits and disabled widow’s benefits. Finds the medical evidence does not support the administrative law judge’s decision that Stage could stand or walk for six hours a day; stoop, crouch, occasionally climb ramps or stairs; and lift or carry up to 20 pounds. Remands for further consideration.

Opinions Feb. 8, 2016

February 8, 2016

Opinions Feb. 5, 2016

February 5, 2016

Opinions Feb. 4, 2016

February 4, 2016
Indiana Court of Appeals
State of Indiana v. Chad T. Mooney, Brittany McCool
Criminal. Affirms denial of the state’s motions for relief from judgment regarding the trial court’s orders permitting Mooney and McCool’s driving privileges to be reinstated without proof of future financial responsibility. The state has not established prima facie error in the trial court’s denial of its motions for relief from judgment. 

Opinions Feb. 3, 2016

February 3, 2016
Indiana Court of Appeals
Brenda Hall v. Dallman Contractors, LLC, Shook LLC, and AT&T Services, Inc.
Civil tort. Affirms summary judgment in favor of AT&T Services Inc. on Hall’s negligence action against the company. It is barred by the exclusive remedies provision of the Worker’s Compensation Act because Hall has already received a workers’ compensation settlement from Ameritech, her employer, which, like AT&T Services Inc., is a subsidiary of AT&T Inc.
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  1. I think the cops are doing a great job locking up criminals. The Murder rates in the inner cities are skyrocketing and you think that too any people are being incarcerated. Maybe we need to lock up more of them. We have the ACLU, BLM, NAACP, Civil right Division of the DOJ, the innocent Project etc. We have court system with an appeal process that can go on for years, with attorneys supplied by the government. I'm confused as to how that translates into the idea that the defendants are not being represented properly. Maybe the attorneys need to do more Pro-Bono work

  2. We do not have 10% of our population (which would mean about 32 million) incarcerated. It's closer to 2%.

  3. If a class action suit or other manner of retribution is possible, count me in. I have email and voicemail from the man. He colluded with opposing counsel, I am certain. My case was damaged so severely it nearly lost me everything and I am still paying dearly.

  4. There's probably a lot of blame that can be cast around for Indiana Tech's abysmal bar passage rate this last February. The folks who decided that Indiana, a state with roughly 16,000 to 18,000 attorneys, needs a fifth law school need to question the motives that drove their support of this project. Others, who have been "strong supporters" of the law school, should likewise ask themselves why they believe this institution should be supported. Is it because it fills some real need in the state? Or is it, instead, nothing more than a resume builder for those who teach there part-time? And others who make excuses for the students' poor performance, especially those who offer nothing more than conspiracy theories to back up their claims--who are they helping? What evidence do they have to support their posturing? Ultimately, though, like most everything in life, whether one succeeds or fails is entirely within one's own hands. At least one student from Indiana Tech proved this when he/she took and passed the February bar. A second Indiana Tech student proved this when they took the bar in another state and passed. As for the remaining 9 who took the bar and didn't pass (apparently, one of the students successfully appealed his/her original score), it's now up to them (and nobody else) to ensure that they pass on their second attempt. These folks should feel no shame; many currently successful practicing attorneys failed the bar exam on their first try. These same attorneys picked themselves up, dusted themselves off, and got back to the rigorous study needed to ensure they would pass on their second go 'round. This is what the Indiana Tech students who didn't pass the first time need to do. Of course, none of this answers such questions as whether Indiana Tech should be accredited by the ABA, whether the school should keep its doors open, or, most importantly, whether it should have even opened its doors in the first place. Those who promoted the idea of a fifth law school in Indiana need to do a lot of soul-searching regarding their decisions. These same people should never be allowed, again, to have a say about the future of legal education in this state or anywhere else. Indiana already has four law schools. That's probably one more than it really needs. But it's more than enough.

  5. This man Steve Hubbard goes on any online post or forum he can find and tries to push his company. He said court reporters would be obsolete a few years ago, yet here we are. How does he have time to search out every single post about court reporters and even spy in private court reporting forums if his company is so successful???? Dude, get a life. And back to what this post was about, I agree that some national firms cause a huge problem.