Child Molesting

Ex-Subway pitchman in suit: Victim's parents to blame

September 2, 2016
Subway's former pitchman imprisoned for child pornography and sex abuse is arguing in a court filing that the parents of one of his female victims are to blame for what he describes as her "destructive behaviors."
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Sandusky denies at appeals hearing that he molested boys

August 12, 2016
 Associated Press
Jerry Sandusky took the stand Friday to forcefully deny the child molestation charges he was convicted of four years ago and said it wasn't his idea to waive his right to testify during his 2012 trial.
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7th Circuit: Court needs permission to revise supervised release conditions once appealed

July 28, 2016
Jennifer Nelson
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals declined to overrule recent precedents in a man’s appeal involving his supervised release conditions and instead adopted a rule of practice for the Circuit.
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Unlicensed social worker must answer accused molester’s questions

July 6, 2016
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Wednesday that an unlicensed social worker who provided services to the victim of a man accused of molestation is not protected under the counselor/client privilege in I.C. 25-23.6-6.1. As a result, the woman must answer four questions her attorney previously advised her not to answer.
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Judge frees man held 3 years after molesting acquittals

July 1, 2016
 Associated Press
A Portage man held without bond for three years has been acquitted of four counts of child molesting and ordered immediately released from jail.
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Molest conviction affirmed; habitual offender waiver remanded

May 23, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals found a counsel's mistake did not constitute judicial admission in a man's trial when he was found guilty of molesting his stepdaughter. But the appeals court remanded his guilty plea for being a habitual offender, finding he did not waive his right to trial on the issue at court, his attorney did.
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Split 7th Circuit affirms child abuse, firearms convictions

May 5, 2016
Scott Roberts
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a man’s child abuse and firearms convictions in a split decision. The court was divided over the admittance of the man's refusal to take a polygraph test into evidence.
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7th Circuit affirms COA sentence in split decision

April 27, 2016
Scott Roberts
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in a split decision the Indiana Court of Appeals did not make any error in federal law when it upheld a man’s consecutive 40-year sentences for three convictions of child molestation.
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Attorney: Child molest convict vows to support daughter

March 4, 2016
 Associated Press
The attorney for an Indianapolis man sentenced to 12 years on probation for molesting his daughter says his client has promised to devote his life to financially support the girl since he has avoided prison.
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COA re-enters molestation conviction, rejects evidence challenge

December 31, 2015
Dave Stafford
A trial court erred in vacating one of two convictions of Class A felony child molesting at a Dearborn County man’s sentencing, the Court of Appeals ruled Thursday. The panel also rejected the offender’s claim evidence should not have been admitted.
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COA reaffirms reversal of molest convictions for vouching

December 23, 2015
Dave Stafford
The Indiana Court of Appeals clarified its position on rehearing Wednesday in the reversal of child molesting convictions that the state “vigorously argues” were erroneously ruled reversible error.
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State performed due diligence charging man in 25-year-old attack

October 8, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
In a matter of first impression, the Indiana Court of Appeals held that state employees met the due diligence requirement of I.C. 35-41-4-2 regarding the statute of limitations in charging a man in 2013 for an attack on a 10-year-old girl in 1988.
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Facebook message, other evidence proper in molester’s trial

September 15, 2015
Dave Stafford
Evidence including a Facebook message sent to a 15-year-old girl was properly admitted in the trial of a man convicted of sexually abusing her at knifepoint, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Tuesday.
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Child interviewer’s vouching testimony reverses molest convictions

September 9, 2015
Dave Stafford
A man convicted of three counts of Class A felony child molesting must be retried because the trial court erred by admitting testimony from a forensic interviewer who said there was no evidence the alleged victims had been coached.
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Days on appeal bond not subject to credit time

August 26, 2015
Dave Stafford
A defendant who was released after an appeals court vacated a conviction that was later upheld by the Indiana Supreme Court cannot count the time he was released pending appeal against his sentence.
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Study: Child sexual assault 'far too common' in Indiana

August 21, 2015
 Associated Press
A report by the Global Health Communication Center at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis states that adolescent sexual assault is “far too common” in the state.
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Jailhouse calls to girlfriend urging sex with son properly admitted

August 19, 2015
Dave Stafford
A jailed man’s 15 phone calls with his girlfriend urging her to have sex with her learning-disabled son to show he wasn’t gay were properly admitted as evidence that led to his conviction of conspiracy to commit child molesting.
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Molestation charge dropped against committed incompetent defendant

August 14, 2015
Dave Stafford
A child molestation charge must be dropped against an incompetent defendant who’s been in psychiatric hospitals longer than he could have been imprisoned had he been convicted, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Friday.
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Letter to victim’s mother supports lesser misdemeanor charge

August 7, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
A defendant’s rambling letter to a victim’s mother was not enough to uphold his convictions for attempted obstruction of justice and invasion of privacy, but it was sufficient to support a lesser charge.
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Justices affirm molestation conviction despite vouching testimony

July 30, 2015
Dave Stafford
A man’s conviction of Class C felony child molestation was affirmed Thursday by the Indiana Supreme Court, which held that even though improper vouching testimony was admitted in error, the defendant failed to preserve the issue for appeal.
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Trial court had discretion in allowing hearsay statements into evidence

July 17, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
A trial court, which excused two young girls from testifying against their abuser at trial and instead allowed their prior statements to be admitted into evidence, did not abuse its discretion, the Indiana Court of Appeals has ruled.
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Bungled recording does not violate constitutional rights

July 15, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
An Anderson man’s argument that his due process rights were violated by law enforcement’s failure to record the audio from two interviews with his daughters did not convince the Indiana Court of Appeals.
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In 3-2 decision, justices reinstate molestation conviction

July 6, 2015
Dave Stafford
A 3-2 decision of the Indiana Supreme Court on Thursday reinstated a Class A felony child molestation conviction that the Court of Appeals reversed because the defendant was denied opportunities to admit evidence.
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Court split over whether man must remain on sex offender registry

June 17, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
An Indiana man who committed Class A felony child molesting in 1988 will remain on the Indiana Sex Offender Registry, a divided Court of Appeals held Wednesday.
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Judicial candidate serving as juror was not fundamental error

June 9, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
A man convicted of child molesting argued that an attorney and judicial candidate should not have been allowed to serve as a juror on his trial. But he failed to object to her placement on the jury at the time of the trial, and the Indiana Court of Appeals rejected his claim of fundamental error.
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  1. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  2. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  3. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

  4. For some strange reason this story, like many on this ezine that question the powerful, seems to have been released in two formats. Prior format here: http://www.theindianalawyer.com/nominees-selected-for-us-attorney-in-indiana/PARAMS/article/44263 That observed, I must note that it is quite refreshing that denizens of the great unwashed (like me) can be allowed to openly question powerful elitists at ICE MILLER who are on the public dole like Selby. Kudos to those at this ezine who understand that they cannot be mere lapdogs to the powerful and corrupt, lest freedom bleed out. If you wonder why the Senator resisted Selby, consider reading the comments here for a theory: http://www.theindianalawyer.com/nominees-selected-for-us-attorney-in-indiana/PARAMS/article/44263

  5. Why is it a crisis that people want to protect their rights themselves? The courts have a huge bias against people appearing on their own behalf and these judges and lawyers will face their maker one day and answer for their actions.

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