labor and employment

COA leaves arbitrator’s award in place

November 12, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Court of Appeals on Thursday declined Madison County’s request that it correct or vacate an arbitrator’s award in favor of two county highway department employees. The appeals court concluded the county circumvented the collective bargaining agreement when it discharged the two employees.
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Panel: Indiana's economy to grow at slightly faster rate

November 5, 2015
 Associated Press, IBJ Staff
Indiana's economy will grow at a slightly faster rate next year and into 2017 even as the state faces challenges from weakening international markets, Indiana University economists said Thursday in their annual forecast.
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Pence decides to pay off federal unemployment loan

October 22, 2015
 Associated Press, IBJ Staff
Gov. Mike Pence on Thursday morning announced that the state would use about $250 million from Indiana's surplus to finish paying back the federal government for a loan the state took out to pay unemployment benefits during the recession.
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Complaint targets Quicken Loans' employee free speech rules

September 28, 2015
 Associated Press
Mortgage giant Quicken Loans overly restricts employees' free speech and should rewrite its rules for workers and educate employees about their rights, according to a National Labor Relations Board complaint.
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Marshal’s wage suit against town fails on appeal

September 17, 2015
Dave Stafford
A former marshal in a small southern Indiana town is not entitled to unpaid wages, overtime and other damages because the town employed fewer than five law enforcement officers, the Indiana Court of Appeals held Thursday in a matter of first impression.
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Union wins closely watched labor case over who’s the boss

August 28, 2015
 Bloomberg News
More companies may be held responsible for labor-law violations committed by contractors and forced to negotiate wages and benefits with their workers under a decision by a politically split U.S. labor board.
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Law professor’s book spotlights service workers’ fight for unions

August 26, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law professor Fran Quigley's book, “If We Can Win Here: The New Front Lines of the Labor Movement,” examines how the push for higher wages and better working conditions is playing out in the very red Hoosier state.
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Doubt means don’t: Drafting an effective social media policy

August 26, 2015
Stephanie Cassman, Nabeela Virjee
Because social media is a relatively new phenomenon, employers have been wading into uncharted territories when creating and implementing social media policies.
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Independent contractor or employee: DOL gives guidance

August 26, 2015
Carolyn Hall
In mid-July, the administrator for the Department of Labor’s wage and hour division issued an interpretation to give guidance about whether a worker is an independent contractor or an employee.
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Proposal would double salary threshold for exempt employees

August 26, 2015
Dave Stafford
Employment attorneys and their clients large and small are scrambling to find ways to deal with a likely change in federal regulation that could more than double the earnings threshold for workers classified as exempt from overtime.
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California says Uber drivers are employees

June 18, 2015
 Bloomberg News
The California labor commissioner’s ruling that an Uber Technologies Inc. driver must be treated as an employee may have repercussions throughout the on-demand economy.
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Lawsuit says Mourdock gave chief deputy 3-year contract

May 28, 2015
 Associated Press
A lawsuit by former Indiana Treasurer Richard Mourdock's chief deputy challenging his firing claims the official gave him a three-year, $300,000 contract before he resigned from office last year.
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Pence signs bill repealing Indiana construction wage law

May 7, 2015
 Associated Press
Local boards will no longer set minimum wages for public construction projects in Indiana under a law signed Wednesday by Gov. Mike Pence.
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Senate narrowly backs repeal of construction wage law

April 15, 2015
 Associated Press
The Indiana Senate has narrowly approved a Republican-led push to repeal the state law that sets wages for public construction projects.
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Senate considers changes to bill repealing construction wage

April 15, 2015
 Associated Press
The Republican-controlled Senate defeated several proposed changes Tuesday to a measure that would repeal the state's construction wage law, despite growing concerns over how the bill will affect Indiana's construction industry.
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Court declines to interfere in former pastor’s breach of contract suit

April 8, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
A Greensburg pastor who filed a complaint against his former church after they terminated his contract was not able to prove to the Court of Appeals that the courts could review his claims without reference to either church law or doctrine.
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Focus: The transgender employees: guidance for employers

March 25, 2015
With the increased visibility of transgender people in the media, you’ve probably heard about Jazz Jennings, the 14-year-old activist who recently landed a show on TLC which will feature her family and how she deals with typical teen drama as a transgender individual. Or, you’ve spent a Saturday binge watching the Netflix hit “Orange is the New Black,” a show staring Laverne Cox, a transgender actress and LGBT advocate, who is the first openly transgender person to be nominated for an Emmy. It is refreshing to see trans people in the media as it reflects our growth and acceptance as a society for those who have been historically mistreated and underrepresented.
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NCAA appeal says students will lose if amateur sports rules tossed

March 18, 2015
 Bloomberg News
Professional sports and higher education are a losing combination for American college students and fans. That was the National Collegiate Athletic Association’s game-day argument as it seeks to reverse a judge’s ruling that the organization behind March Madness and January bowl games is running a multibillion-dollar cartel that cheats athletes.
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House panel backs repealing Indiana public projects wage law

February 17, 2015
 Associated Press
A sharply divided Indiana House committee has endorsed a proposal to repeal the state law that sets wages for public construction projects.
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Indiana bills to increase minimum wage go unheard

February 11, 2015
Dave Stafford
More than half of states in the U.S. have enacted laws increasing their minimum wages above the federal standard of $7.25 an hour, but the Indiana Legislature won’t even discuss it.
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Senate passes bill allowing religion-based hiring by contractors

February 3, 2015
 Associated Press, IL Staff
The Indiana Senate has moved a bill to the House of Representatives that will allow religious institutions that receive state and local government contracts to make hiring decisions based upon religion.
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State union membership counters national trend

January 27, 2015
 Associated Press, IBJ Staff
Indiana bucked a national trend in 2014 by experiencing an increase in labor union membership, new statistics released by the U. S. Labor Department show.
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Menard accused of witness tampering

January 19, 2015
IBJ Staff, J.K. Wall
The gritty legal battle between hardware store titan John Menard Jr. and Indianapolis power couple Steve and Tomisue Hilbert now includes this accusation: trying to buy off a witness.
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Full 7th Circuit declines to rehear right-to-work appeal

January 15, 2015
Jennifer Nelson
An even split among all of the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals judges as to whether to rehear an appeal challenging Indiana’s right-to-work law means that its previous affirmation of the law will stand.
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Right-to-work court battle may not be over

December 31, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Despite a series of court rulings upholding Indiana’s right-to-work law, unions are not stopping their efforts to have the law overturned. Some opponents are considering petitioning for a review by the Supreme Court of the United States as well as filing another lawsuit in Indiana state court.
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  1. Other than a complete lack of any verifiable and valid historical citations to back your wild context-free accusations, you also forget to allege "ate Native American children, ate slave children, ate their own children, and often did it all while using salad forks rather than dinner forks." (gasp)

  2. "So we broke with England for the right to "off" our preborn progeny at will, and allow the processing plant doing the dirty deeds (dirt cheap) to profit on the marketing of those "products of conception." I was completely maleducated on our nation's founding, it would seem. (But I know the ACLU is hard at work to remedy that, too.)" Well, you know, we're just following in the footsteps of our founders who raped women, raped slaves, raped children, maimed immigrants, sold children, stole property, broke promises, broke apart families, killed natives... You know, good God fearing down home Christian folk! :/

  3. Who gives a rats behind about all the fluffy ranking nonsense. What students having to pay off debt need to know is that all schools aren't created equal and students from many schools don't have a snowball's chance of getting a decent paying job straight out of law school. Their lowly ranked lawschool won't tell them that though. When schools start honestly (accurately) reporting *those numbers, things will get interesting real quick, and the looks on student's faces will be priceless!

  4. Whilst it may be true that Judges and Justices enjoy such freedom of time and effort, it certainly does not hold true for the average working person. To say that one must 1) take a day or a half day off work every 3 months, 2) gather a list of information including recent photographs, and 3) set up a time that is convenient for the local sheriff or other such office to complete the registry is more than a bit near-sighted. This may be procedural, and hence, in the near-sighted minds of the court, not 'punishment,' but it is in fact 'punishment.' The local sheriffs probably feel a little punished too by the overwork. Registries serve to punish the offender whilst simultaneously providing the public at large with a false sense of security. The false sense of security is dangerous to the public who may not exercise due diligence by thinking there are no offenders in their locale. In fact, the registry only informs them of those who have been convicted.

  5. Unfortunately, the court doesn't understand the difference between ebidta and adjusted ebidta as they clearly got the ruling wrong based on their misunderstanding

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