Election issues

7th Circuit enjoins limits on 'super' PAC contributions

August 2, 2011
Michael Hoskins
A prominent Terre Haute attorney known for his work challenging campaign finance laws and regulations scored another legal victory after the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals enjoined state limits on contributions to what’s known as "super" political action committees.
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Court issues judgment in absentee ballot case

December 16, 2009
Jennifer Nelson
The Marion Circuit Court has outlined the required procedures for dealing with the county's absentee ballots following a suit that accused the Marion County Election Board of not following statute.
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Justices: new Terre Haute election not needed

June 16, 2009
Michael Hoskins
A special election isn't needed to determine the rightful mayor of Terre Haute, the Indiana Supreme Court ruled today.
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COA upholds dismissal of election challenges

May 28, 2009
Jennifer Nelson
Today Indiana's appellate courts are dealing with two mayoral election disputes, with the Court of Appeals ruling on one in Muncie and the Supreme Court hearing arguments in another from Terre Haute.
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High court grants order in election case

March 5, 2009
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court issued an order today granting the Marion County Election Board's corrected motion to remand a case pursuant to Appellate Rule 37.
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Justices asked to take Terre Haute mayor case

December 16, 2008
Michael Hoskins
The Indiana Supreme Court is being asked to consider the role a federal law plays in deciding who is Terre Haute's current mayor and whether a special election is needed.
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COA voids Terre Haute's 2007 mayoral election

November 13, 2008
Michael Hoskins
The man elected Terre Haute's mayor was ineligible because of federal law to become a candidate or assume office, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled today on an issue of first impression. As a result, a special election is needed to fill the vacancy.
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Courts leave election law questions unanswered

November 4, 2008
Michael Hoskins
In the days leading up to an Election Day where thousands of Hoosier voters had already cast ballots before polls even opened, Indiana's appellate judges issued a pair of election law rulings that leave more questions than answers and will likely lead to further review.
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COA: Keep early-voting sites open

November 3, 2008
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Court of Appeals upheld a special judge's ruling to keep early-voting sites open in Lake County, holding that even if election law was violated in establishing the sites, public interest in having the sites would keep them open.
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Appeals filed in challenged mail-in ballot ruling

November 3, 2008
Jennifer Nelson
The plaintiffs in a Marion County suit involving how challenged mail-in absentee ballots are counted have filed a verified appellate Rule 56(a) motion for the Indiana Supreme Court to accept jurisdiction over their appeal.
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Absentee ballots challenged in Marion County

October 31, 2008
Jennifer Nelson
Republicans in Indiana are challenging early votes again, only this time Marion County absentee ballots are being questioned.
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Arguments set in Lake County early-voting case

October 27, 2008
IL Staff
The Indiana Court of Appeals will hear arguments in the Lake County early-voter registration appeal at 1:30 p.m. EDT Oct. 30 in the Indiana Supreme Court Courtroom, Statehouse Room 317, Indianapolis.
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High court transfer filed in early-voting case

October 24, 2008
Jennifer Nelson
The plaintiffs in a suit challenging Lake County early-voting satellite locations are appealing a special judge's order to keep the locations open to the Indiana Supreme Court.
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Special judge: Keep early-voting sites open

October 22, 2008
Jennifer Nelson
A special judge has ordered satellite early-voting sites in East Chicago, Gary, and Hammond to remain open over the objections of two Lake County Republicans.
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Justices tap special judge in Lake County case

October 16, 2008
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court has appointed Lake Superior Judge Diane Kavadias Schneider, Civil Division 1, as a special judge in the consolidated Lake County cases involving the operations of early-voting sites in East Chicago, Gary, and Hammond, according to Kathryn Dolan, Indiana Supreme Court spokesperson.
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Court consolidates Lake County voter cases

October 15, 2008
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Supreme Court has stepped in to settle conflicting rulings from two Lake County courts regarding early-voting sites in East Chicago, Gary, and Hammond, deciding that consolidating the cases to proceed in Lake Superior Court is the "most orderly approach."
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ISBA seeks lawyers for election program

September 3, 2008
IL Staff
The Indiana State Bar Association is looking for attorneys to help educate students about government and voting on Election Day.
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High court asked to intervene in recount

January 1, 2007
Michael Hoskins
The Indiana Supreme Court is being asked to toss out a trial judge's order for a Terre Haute mayoral race recount because the petitioner failed to include the winner's middle initial.Attorney James Bopp Jr. with Terre Haute law firm Bopp Coleson & Bostrom filed an emergency request Thursday afternoon for the justices to intervene in the recount challenge, contending that Vigo Circuit Judge David Bolk didn't have jurisdiction to order a recount from the Nov. 6 election. Democratic Mayor Kevin Burke...
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  1. Whether you support "gay marriage" or not is not the issue. The issue is whether the SCOTUS can extract from an unmentionable somewhere the notion that the Constitution forbids government "interference" in the "right" to marry. Just imagine time-traveling to Philadelphia in 1787. Ask James Madison if the document he and his fellows just wrote allowed him- or forbade government to "interfere" with- his "right" to marry George Washington? He would have immediately- and justly- summoned the Sergeant-at-Arms to throw your sorry self out into the street. Far from being a day of liberation, this is a day of capitulation by the Rule of Law to the Rule of What's Happening Now.

  2. With today's ruling, AG Zoeller's arguments in the cases of Obamacare and Same-sex Marriage can be relegated to the ash heap of history. 0-fer

  3. She must be a great lawyer

  4. Ind. Courts - "Illinois ranks 49th for how court system serves disadvantaged" What about Indiana? A story today from Dave Collins of the AP, here published in the Benton Illinois Evening News, begins: Illinois' court system had the third-worst score in the nation among state judiciaries in serving poor, disabled and other disadvantaged members of the public, according to new rankings. Illinois' "Justice Index" score of 34.5 out of 100, determined by the nonprofit National Center for Access to Justice, is based on how states serve people with disabilities and limited English proficiency, how much free legal help is available and how states help increasing numbers of people representing themselves in court, among other issues. Connecticut led all states with a score of 73.4 and was followed by Hawaii, Minnesota, New York and Delaware, respectively. Local courts in Washington, D.C., had the highest overall score at 80.9. At the bottom was Oklahoma at 23.7, followed by Kentucky, Illinois, South Dakota and Indiana. ILB: That puts Indiana at 46th worse. More from the story: Connecticut, Hawaii, Minnesota, Colorado, Tennessee and Maine had perfect 100 scores in serving people with disabilities, while Indiana, Georgia, Wyoming, Missouri and Idaho had the lowest scores. Those rankings were based on issues such as whether interpretation services are offered free to the deaf and hearing-impaired and whether there are laws or rules allowing service animals in courthouses. The index also reviewed how many civil legal aid lawyers were available to provide free legal help. Washington, D.C., had nearly nine civil legal aid lawyers per 10,000 people in poverty, the highest rate in the country. Texas had the lowest rate, 0.43 legal aid lawyers per 10,000 people in poverty. http://indianalawblog.com/archives/2014/11/ind_courts_illi_1.html

  5. A very thorough opinion by the federal court. The Rooker-Feldman analysis, in particular, helps clear up muddy water as to the entanglement issue. Looks like the Seventh Circuit is willing to let its district courts cruise much closer to the Indiana Supreme Court's shorelines than most thought likely, at least when the ADA on the docket. Some could argue that this case and Praekel, taken together, paint a rather unflattering picture of how the lower courts are being advised as to their duties under the ADA. A read of the DOJ amicus in Praekel seems to demonstrate a less-than-congenial view toward the higher echelons in the bureaucracy.

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