Obituary

Former Civil Rights Commission director, MCBA president dies

October 15, 2012
IL Staff
Sandra Leek, who ran the Indiana Civil Rights Commission for 13 years, died Oct. 12 after battling cancer. She was 58.
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Former state bar president, IU trustee dies

October 5, 2012
IL Staff
Frederick F. Eichhorn Jr., a retired attorney who served as president of the Indiana State Bar Association in the 1980s has died.
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Miami Circuit Judge Robert Spahr dies

September 5, 2012
IL Staff
Miami Circuit Judge Robert A. Spahr, 66, died Monday at his residence after a brief battle with cancer.
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Evansville senior judge dies

July 19, 2012
IL Staff
Judge Thomas “Tom” Lockyear, the man who was appointed to Vanderburgh Superior Court in 1985 to replace former Chief Justice Randall T. Shepard, died Wednesday.
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Retired Putnam County judge dies

March 14, 2012
IL Staff
Retired Putnam Superior Judge Sally Hallof Gray passed away Tuesday. She was 78.
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Retired COA Judge William G. Conover dies

January 10, 2012
Michael Hoskins
Former Indiana Court of Appeals Judge William G. Conover died Monday in Valparaiso. He was 86.
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Services Sunday for longtime litigator Edgar Bayliff

January 6, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Attorney Edgar Bayliff, former president of the Indiana Trial Lawyers Association, died Jan. 4. He was 84.
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Legal community remembers longtime judge

September 28, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Judge Robert Brown was known for patience and professionalism.
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Former Jackson Circuit Judge Robert R. Brown dies

September 14, 2011
Jenny Montgomery
Robert R. Brown, retired Jackson Circuit judge, died Sept. 12 at his Brownstown home. He was 78.
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Prominent employment attorney dies

September 16, 2008
Jennifer Nelson
Virginia O'Leary, a prominent employment attorney in southern Indiana, died yesterday at the age of 74. O'Leary spent more than 30 years representing women and minorities seeking equal employment opportunities.
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Founding partner of Indy law firm dies

August 29, 2008
Jennifer Nelson
Mark W. Gray, a founding partner of Indianapolis-based Kightlinger & Gray, died Aug. 27 after a nearly four-year struggle with heart disease and cancer. He was 91.
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  1. Oh, the name calling was not name calling, it was merely social commentary making this point, which is on the minds of many, as an aside to the article's focus: https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100111082327AAmlmMa Or, if you prefer a local angle, I give you exhibit A in that analysis of viva la difference: http://fox59.com/2015/03/16/moed-appears-on-house-floor-says-hes-not-resigning/

  2. Too many attorneys take their position as a license to intimidate and threaten non attorneys in person and by mail. Did find it ironic that a reader moved to comment twice on this article could not complete a paragraph without resorting to insulting name calling (rethuglican) as a substitute for reasoned discussion. Some people will never get the point this action should have made.

  3. People have heard of Magna Carta, and not the Provisions of Oxford & Westminster. Not that anybody really cares. Today, it might be considered ethnic or racial bias to talk about the "Anglo Saxon common law." I don't even see the word English in the blurb above. Anyhow speaking of Edward I-- he was famously intolerant of diversity himself viz the Edict of Expulsion 1290. So all he did too like making parliament a permanent institution-- that all must be discredited. 100 years from now such commemorations will be in the dustbin of history.

  4. Oops, I meant discipline, not disciple. Interesting that those words share such a close relationship. We attorneys are to be disciples of the law, being disciplined to serve the law and its source, the constitutions. Do that, and the goals of Magna Carta are advanced. Do that not and Magna Carta is usurped. Do that not and you should be disciplined. Do that and you should be counted a good disciple. My experiences, once again, do not reveal a process that is adhering to the due process ideals of Magna Carta. Just the opposite, in fact. Braveheart's dying rebel (for a great cause) yell comes to mind.

  5. It is not a sign of the times that many Ind licensed attorneys (I am not) would fear writing what I wrote below, even if they had experiences to back it up. Let's take a minute to thank God for the brave Baron's who risked death by torture to tell the government that it was in the wrong. Today is a career ruination that whistleblowers risk. That is often brought on by denial of licenses or disciple for those who dare speak truth to power. Magna Carta says truth rules power, power too often claims that truth matters not, only Power. Fight such power for the good of our constitutional republics. If we lose them we have only bureaucratic tyranny to pass onto our children. Government attorneys, of all lawyers, should best realize this and work to see our patrimony preserved. I am now a government attorney (once again) in Kansas, and respecting the rule of law is my passion, first and foremost.

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