School and Education Law

Indiana sues 2 former school administrators for $3M

May 26, 2017
 Associated Press
The Indiana Attorney General's office is suing two former Munster school administrators for more than $3 million, alleging the pair misappropriated, illegally retained or fraudulently obtained public funds.
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Justice Department: School bullying persists, sex assaults up

May 16, 2017
 Associated Press
One in every 5 middle and high school students has complained of being bullied at school and the number of reports of sexual assault on college campuses has more than tripled over the past decade, according to a federal study released Tuesday.
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Court rules Notre Dame must allow dismissed student to take final exams

May 9, 2017
Olivia Covington
A senior at the University of Notre Dame will sit for the last two final exams of his undergraduate career this week after a federal judge ruled the university could not prevent him from taking the exams even though he was dismissed from the campus after a disciplinary action.
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Indiana students fight to display pro-abortion rights sign

May 3, 2017
 Associated Press
Students at a suburban Indiana high school who were told they couldn't hang a pro-abortion rights sign in the cafeteria are turning to the courts, arguing that another student group was allowed to put up an anti-abortion sign last year.
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Holcomb faces deadline on 'sanctuary campus' bill

May 1, 2017
Olivia Covington
Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb has just one day left to decide whether he will sign a controversial bill that would prohibit Indiana colleges and universities from adopting “sanctuary campus” policies.
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Charter school facing suit warns of potential ‘chaos’

May 1, 2017
Dave Stafford
An Ellettsville charter school affiliated with a religious institution warns that if a federal lawsuit targeting the school’s state funding is successful, similar charter schools statewide could face “chaos.”
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Suit takes aim at Indiana religious-affiliated charter schools

April 25, 2017
Dave Stafford
A Monroe County nonprofit organization has sued the state and a charter school, seeking to block its funding because the group argues that taking tax dollars from public schools for the benefit of private religious institutions violates the Establishment Clause of the U.S. Constitution.
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SCOTUS to hear church-state case

April 17, 2017
 Associated Press
Justice Neil Gorsuch's first week on the U.S. Supreme Court bench features an important case about the separation of church and state that has its roots on a Midwestern church playground. The outcome could make it easier to use state money to pay for private, religious schooling in many states.
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Closing Indiana college faces lawsuit from faculty

April 13, 2017
 Associated Press
Tenured faculty members from a northwest Indiana college that's closing recently filed a lawsuit claiming the college breached its contract with them.
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New Castle Schools negligence case headed to trial

April 13, 2017
Olivia Covington
The Indiana Court of Appeals has reversed summary judgment in case stemming from an altercation in a New Castle career program, finding that genuine issues of material fact remain as to whether the school was negligent.
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Trump defends Obama's for-profit college crackdown

April 4, 2017
 Bloomberg News
For-profit colleges were supposed to thrive under a Trump administration staffed by officials known to be friendly to the industry. A legal filing from last week suggests perhaps those assumptions were premature.
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Complaint seeks equal access to elementary school’s playground

April 3, 2017
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana Disability Rights says it has filed a complaint with the state against Richmond Community Schools for segregating disabled students from the playground.
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SCOTUS bolsters rights of learning-disabled students

March 22, 2017
 Associated Press
A unanimous Supreme Court of the United States on Wednesday bolstered the rights of millions of learning-disabled students in a ruling that requires public schools to offer special education programs that meet higher standards.
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District court again rules against Concord Schools on ‘Christmas Spectacular’

March 8, 2017
Olivia Covington
A district court judge has once again entered judgment against a northern Indiana school district after finding it has not made “absolutely clear” that it will permanently nix overtly religious content from its annual Christmas program.
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Bill prohibiting sanctuary campuses moves to Indiana House

March 1, 2017
Olivia Covington
A bill meant to require Indiana colleges and universities to comply with federal immigration investigations has passed the Senate, though concerns remain about the policy’s implication on Indiana campuses.
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Indiana House OKs bill on prayer in schools

February 28, 2017
 Associated Press
A legislative proposal whose author says it would put prayer back in schools has cleared the Indiana House.
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Supreme Court could decide transgender case. Or not.

February 24, 2017
 Associated Press
Both the transgender teen who sued to use a boys' bathroom and the Virginia school board that won't let him still want the U.S. Supreme Court to issue a definitive ruling in their ongoing dispute, even after the Trump administration retreated from an Obama-era policy on bathroom use.
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House education panel backs school prayer bill

February 21, 2017
 Associated Press
Students’ right to pray aloud in Indiana schools would be reaffirmed under a measure a House education committee has approved.
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State lawmakers discuss expanding screening for teachers

January 30, 2017
 Associated Press
Indiana lawmakers are proposing legislation they say will help strengthen Indiana’s system for running background checks for teachers.
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Consumer agency accuses Navient of 'systematically' cheating borrowers

January 19, 2017
 Bloomberg News
Navient Corp. has been sued by a U.S. regulator over allegations that the student loan giant “systematically” cheated borrowers.
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Former ITT students seek creditor status in school's bankruptcy case

January 4, 2017
Indianapolis Business Journal, Susan Orr
A group of former ITT Educational Services Inc. students are seeking legal recognition as creditors in ITT’s ongoing bankruptcy case.
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ITT Chapter 7 bankruptcy fallout

November 30, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
The student records are only one aspect of this bankruptcy. There are employee records, pension benefits, 401(k) retirement funds plus lawsuits previously filed by federal agencies and some states’ attorneys general.
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ACLU sues Franklin Township schools over Christian prayer

November 23, 2016
Dave Stafford
A man represented by the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana has filed a lawsuit challenging the Franklin Township School Board’s alleged policy of opening meetings with exclusively Christian prayers.
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Marian University facing suit over professor's alleged sexual misconduct

November 3, 2016
Hayleigh Colombo, Indianapolis Business Journal
Marian University is facing a lawsuit alleging the school acted with deliberate indifference while one of its professors sexually harassed a male student.
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2 former Vigo County school officials face federal charge

November 3, 2016
 Associated Press
Two former western Indiana school officials each face a federal charge for allegedly taking kickbacks from a contractor over two years.
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  1. He TIL team,please zap this comment too since it was merely marking a scammer and not reflecting on the story. Thanks, happy Monday, keep up the fine work.

  2. You just need my social security number sent to your Gmail account to process then loan, right? Beware scammers indeed.

  3. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

  4. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  5. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

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