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Lawyer’s book retraces Indy’s infamous Sylvia Likens murder case

October 22, 2014
Dave Stafford
Almost 50 years later, Forrest Bowman Jr. is talking about the murder case involving Indianapolis teen Sylvia Likens, something he’s not done much of in the past. His just-released book, “Sylvia: The Likens Trial,” presents a thorough, inside, day-by-day recollection of a trial that captivated and horrified the state in 1966.
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SCOTUS denial of cases opens door to new same-sex-couple issues

October 22, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Now that same-sex marriage is legal in Indiana, the courts will have to settle issues and questions that will arise in other areas, such as family law.
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Attorneys debate impact of reality crime TV shows on the judicial process

October 22, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
The reality television show “Cold Justice” linked Earl Taylor to the 1975 murder of his first wife, Kathy Taylor. Dennis Majewski, Earl Taylor's attorney, said the TV program carried by the TNT cable network, and a follow-up newspaper article that told viewers the episode was available on YouTube, led him to doubt he could find an untainted jury in Vigo County.
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Lawmakers in no rush to fix Marion County’s judicial selection process

October 22, 2014
Dave Stafford
Marion County’s unique power-sharing judicial-election system won’t be fixed anytime soon, even though a federal judge has ruled the four-decade-old system is unconstitutional.
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Pharmacist’s snooping is a prescription for trouble

October 22, 2014
Dave Stafford
Walgreen’s appeal of $1.8M judgment in favor of customer raises patient privacy issues.
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Re-routing the school-to-prison pipeline

October 22, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
Tippecanoe County is just one of a handful of sites across the nation participating in a special initiative designed to constrict the flow of minors into the juvenile justice system and give them a second chance.
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When municipal growth clashes with property owners, the result is annexation headaches

October 22, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
A 644-acre swath of rural Hancock County land is at the heart of a contentious annexation battle that illustrates what municipalities say is the need to get control of property before development happens. The case also brings to light what may be a shift in the judiciary’s attitude toward remonstrators.
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Inside the Criminal Case: Contempt, punctuality and expressing yourself to a court

October 22, 2014
James Bell, K. Michael Gaerte
We advise our clients that unfortunately, delays can be part of the court experience. However, one thing we have never advised our clients to do is “tell the court how you really feel.” Or, as Dave Chappelle would say, we have never advised our clients to “keep it real” with the court.
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Public-private partnerships’ popularity peaking

October 22, 2014
Dave Stafford
In an era of tight lending for construction, public-private partnerships are a solution to get desired projects funded and under way. Attorneys who represent parties in such deals say nuanced negotiations hold the key for deals with a shared vision but sometimes competing interests.
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Laurin: Well-crafted contracts can avoid subrogation disputes

October 22, 2014
Most Indiana construction law practitioners would probably agree that Indiana caselaw on construction issues is hardly robust. One exception is cases that address the enforceability of waiver of subrogation provisions (usually under AIA contracts) to prevent claims for damage to the “Work” (again usually as defined by AIA contracts) when a builder’s risk policy should or does cover the damage.
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Singer/Jones: A survival guide for zombie construction projects

October 22, 2014
In real estate and construction, zombies really are all around us. Structures with no life inside scar the real estate landscape in every major city – the abandoned automobile-parts manufacturing facility; the half-completed condo building; the vacant video store with its giant, empty parking lot; the literal hole in the ground surrounded by rusted construction fencing and graffiti – all threatening the health and safety of the structures and inhabitants around them.
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Federal Bar Update: Minor rule changes and attorney-client privilege

October 22, 2014
John Maley
Any amendments to various federal rules always take effect Dec. 1. Some years there are significant changes, other years few or no amendments are in play. This December is very modest in terms of federal rule amendments.
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DTCI: Proceed with caution and civility during depositions

October 22, 2014
As a young lawyer, I have quickly learned that this friction between our duties to our clients and our duty to behave civilly becomes overly apparent at depositions. Without a doubt, depositions are an extremely effective and widely used discovery tool. They present great opportunity to gain valuable facts that can be used against an opponent. That being said, they also present great opportunity for incivility, especially because depositions are generally held outside a judge’s supervision.
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Living Fit: Sitting is killing you, so get moving

October 22, 2014
Sharon McGoff
How is a chair like a cigarette? They can both kill us.
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Start Page: Take a few (more) steps toward a ‘paper-less’ office

October 22, 2014
Seth Wilson
Law firms will likely never be completely paperless (i.e., completely electronic). A good goal for firms, courts and attorneys is to use less paper and be more “paper-less.” This article presents four steps you can take to reduce the use of, and reliance on, paper in practice.
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Hammerle On… 'Gone Girl,' 'The Judge'

October 22, 2014
Robert Hammerle
Bob Hammerle says "The Judge" can't be saved by the appearance of brilliant actors Robert Downey Jr., Robert Duvall and Vera Farmiga.
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Court hearing set for Gary man linked to 7 deaths

October 21, 2014
 Associated Press
A Gary man who police say confessed to killing one woman, helped investigators find six other bodies and indicated there may be more is scheduled to make his first court appearance.
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Judges participate in public forum asking ‘Is Indianapolis the next Ferguson?’

October 21, 2014
Marilyn Odendahl
A public forum in Indianapolis between law enforcement and the community meant to discuss ways the Circle City could avoid exploding like Ferguson, Missouri, instead highlighted the distrust local residents have of police officers.
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Judge must face federal lawsuit over drug court detentions

October 21, 2014
Dave Stafford
Clark Circuit Judge Jerome Jacobi must face a federal lawsuit from drug court participants who allege they were improperly detained or unlawfully arrested as participants in the problem-solving court he oversaw.
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Split COA reverses denial of post-conviction relief

October 21, 2014
Dave Stafford
A defense attorney’s failure to raise the consecutive sentencing limitation prejudiced his client, the majority of a Court of Appeals panel ruled, reversing denial of post-conviction relief for a man convicted of multiple burglaries. The court remanded for resentencing to trim six years off a 28-year prison term.
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Court of Appeals to hear arguments at IU Maurer

October 21, 2014
IL Staff
Indiana University Maurer School of Law will host an oral argument of the Indiana Court of Appeals Wednesday at the school’s moot court.
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St. Joseph County gets $399,000 grant to fight elder abuse

October 21, 2014
IL Staff
St. Joseph County will receive a $399,000 Department of Justice grant for training and services designed to combat violence against elderly and vulnerable populations.
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Pain clinic head faces prescription investigation

October 21, 2014
 Associated Press
State officials want the medical license suspended for a doctor who runs a string of Indiana clinics over his prescribing of pain medications.
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Indiana panel not making ethics suggestions

October 21, 2014
 Associated Press
A state legislative panel isn't making any recommendations on ethics rule changes that the General Assembly is expected to consider during its upcoming session.
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Finding victims in Gary case a lengthy process

October 21, 2014
 Associated Press
Investigators in two states are reviewing unsolved murders and missing person reports after the arrest of an Indiana man who police say confessed to killing seven women and hinted at more victims over a 20-year span.
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  1. It appears the police and prosecutors are allowed to change the rules halfway through the game to suit themselves. I am surprised that the congress has not yet eliminated the right to a trial in cases involving any type of forensic evidence. That would suit their foolish law and order police state views. I say we eliminate the statute of limitations for crimes committed by members of congress and other government employees. Of course they would never do that. They are all corrupt cowards!!!

  2. Poor Judge Brown probably thought that by slavishly serving the godz of the age her violations of 18th century concepts like due process and the rule of law would be overlooked. Mayhaps she was merely a Judge ahead of her time?

  3. in a lawyer discipline case Judge Brown, now removed, was presiding over a hearing about a lawyer accused of the supposedly heinous ethical violation of saying the words "Illegal immigrant." (IN re Barker) http://www.in.gov/judiciary/files/order-discipline-2013-55S00-1008-DI-429.pdf .... I wonder if when we compare the egregious violations of due process by Judge Brown, to her chiding of another lawyer for politically incorrectness, if there are any conclusions to be drawn about what kind of person, what kind of judge, what kind of apparatchik, is busy implementing the agenda of political correctness and making off-limits legit advocacy about an adverse party in a suit whose illegal alien status is relevant? I am just asking the question, the reader can make own conclsuion. Oh wait-- did I use the wrong adjective-- let me rephrase that, um undocumented alien?

  4. of course the bigger questions of whether or not the people want to pay for ANY bussing is off limits, due to the Supreme Court protecting the people from DEMOCRACY. Several decades hence from desegregation and bussing plans and we STILL need to be taking all this taxpayer money to combat mostly-imagined "discrimination" in the most obviously failed social program of the postwar period.

  5. You can put your photos anywhere you like... When someone steals it they know it doesn't belong to them. And, a man getting a divorce is automatically not a nice guy...? That's ridiculous. Since when is need of money a conflict of interest? That would mean that no one should have a job unless they are already financially solvent without a job... A photographer is also under no obligation to use a watermark (again, people know when a photo doesn't belong to them) or provide contact information. Hey, he didn't make it easy for me to pay him so I'll just take it! Well heck, might as well walk out of the grocery store with a cart full of food because the lines are too long and you don't find that convenient. "Only in Indiana." Oh, now you're passing judgement on an entire state... What state do you live in? I need to characterize everyone in your state as ignorant and opinionated. And the final bit of ignorance; assuming a photo anyone would want is lucky and then how much does your camera have to cost to make it a good photo, in your obviously relevant opinion?

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