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Former Indianapolis coach to plead guilty to enticement

May 5, 2016
 Associated Press
Court documents say a former Indianapolis high school boys' basketball coach has agreed to plead guilty to trying to entice a 15-year-old student to have sex with him.
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Attorney must pay parking ticket, nothing more, court holds

May 4, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals ruled that an attorney who was given a $20 parking ticket that ended up costing him $150 in late fees only needs to pay his ticket. The attorney sought $2,500 in damages and fees over the incident.
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Lawyer: Law protects 911 caller in Prince death

May 4, 2016
 Associated Press
A Minneapolis attorney says he believes Minnesota law would protect a California man from any potential charges related to Prince's death.
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Appellate court affirms denial of man’s insanity defense

May 4, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed Wednesday the denial of a man’s insanity defense after he was found guilty of two counts of attempted murder.
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COA affirms murder weapon should be destroyed

May 4, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed denial of man’s request to give the weapon he used for murder back to his mother.
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IU McKinney professor, lawyer in undecided congressional primary race

May 4, 2016
Dave Stafford
A law professor and medical doctor is in an undecided race against a 50-year lawyer for the Democratic nomination for Indiana’s Eighth Congressional District as votes continue to be tallied Wednesday from southwestern Indiana.
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COA: Firm entitled to investigatory expenses

May 4, 2016
Scott Roberts
A firm who represented an indigent man’s murder case pro bono is entitled to the costs of the investigation of his defense, the Court of Appeals ruled, even though the man pleaded guilty.
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Court grants Brady extension to appeal 'Deflategate' decision

May 4, 2016
 Associated Press
Tom Brady's lawyers will get another two weeks to appeal his "Deflategate" suspension.
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Judge sets hearing on bid to block new Indiana abortion law

May 4, 2016
 Associated Press
A federal judge has set a hearing to consider Planned Parenthood's bid to block a new Indiana law that bans abortions sought because of genetic abnormalities.
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Apple loses fight to keep 'iPhone' label off Chinese wallets

May 4, 2016
 Bloomberg News
Apple Inc. lost its fight to keep the “iPhone” name exclusive to its products with a Beijing court deciding a little-known accessories maker can use the label for a range of wallets and purses.
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University of Louisville students' lawsuit against escort dismissed

May 4, 2016
 Associated Press
A Louisville judge has dismissed a lawsuit by University of Louisville students filed against Katina Powell that said the escort's book allegations of sex parties at the men's basketball players' dormitory had devalued their education.
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Bluebook: Here to stay, but lawyers don’t have to like it

May 4, 2016
Scott Roberts
A valuable way to standardize citations and make court cases and sources easier to find, or “560 pages of rubbish” as 7th Circuit Judge Richard Posner said in a recent article for the Green Bag? That’s been the debate over The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation for several years.
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Fee shifts an issue for court reporters

May 4, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
In certain situations, Tom Richardson will watch two attorneys in a deposition and will know one is going to get stuck with a bigger bill for the same service.
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Immigration debate returns to Statehouse

May 4, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
A special Senate committee is looking at undocumented Hoosiers and stirs up some controversy in the process.
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Undocumented immigrant issues left unanswered

May 4, 2016
Scott Roberts
A recent Indiana Court of Appeals decision didn’t provide the guidance one attorney had hoped from the court regarding injured undocumented workers. But the judges did decide that the worker’s immigration status is important in his lawsuit.
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Justices weigh duty of care for house party hosts

May 4, 2016
Dave Stafford
Indiana Supreme Court Justice Steven David posed a graphic hypothetical to an attorney defending a liability suit against a homeowner who hosted a party where a guest died after a fight. David’s scenario encapsulated the justices’ apparent concern over a trial court’s grant of summary judgment in the homeowner’s favor.
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Dean's Desk: New faculty continue legacy of legal scholarship

May 4, 2016
Austen Parrish
Inspired and challenged by the school's awesome legacy, IU Maurer has been fortunate to recruit some of the most promising rising stars in legal education today, all of whom are classroom standouts as well.

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Lawyer turns ‘crisis’ into ‘dream’ with album made with pros

May 4, 2016
Scott Roberts
Craig Helmreich says he couldn’t have planned his midlife crisis any better.
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Funding, use of ADR in family law cases varies in courts around state

May 4, 2016
Dave Stafford
Rensselaer lawyer Samantha Joslyn has handled family law cases filed at the Jasper County courthouse and in several surrounding counties in northwest Indiana. She said whether those cases will be mediated depends in large part on the court where the case is filed.
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Keyes: An alternative alternative dispute resolution process

May 4, 2016
The components of structured negotiation are not new; people resolve problems every day without resorting to litigation. But now the process has been better defined, refined and expanded.
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US Supreme Court ruling affirms class waivers in arbitration clauses

May 4, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
In today’s marketplace, consumers have a choice when purchasing such things as cellphones, banking services and even medical procedures. Sign the contract and get the product. Don’t sign the contract and don’t get the product.
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Neutral Corner: Recent appellate case raises mediation issues

May 4, 2016
John Van Winkle
The recent Indiana Court of Appeals decision Jonas v. State Farm Life Ins. Co., ____N.E. 3d ______, 2016 WL 1248589 (Ind. Ct. App. 2016) highlights several issues concerning mediation and settlement in both state and federal courts.
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Jones: Examining the evolution of hospitals’ vicarious liability

May 4, 2016
The evolution of legal precedent regarding vicarious liability claims has left hospitals shifting in their seats.
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Hammerle on ... 'The Jungle Book,' 'Elvis & Nixon'

May 4, 2016
Robert Hammerle
Bob Hammerle says "Elvis & Nixon" is a hidden cinematic gem.
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7th Circuit: Company responsible for debts

May 3, 2016
Scott Roberts
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed a company and its principals need to pay more than $3.5 million to a company it bought supplies from, even though the purchaser accused the seller of price-gouging.
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  1. He TIL team,please zap this comment too since it was merely marking a scammer and not reflecting on the story. Thanks, happy Monday, keep up the fine work.

  2. You just need my social security number sent to your Gmail account to process then loan, right? Beware scammers indeed.

  3. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

  4. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  5. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

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