Latest News

50 Cent's online photos with cash interest bankruptcy judge

February 22, 2016
 Associated Press
Rapper 50 Cent has been ordered to appear in bankruptcy court in Hartford, Connecticut, to explain photos showing him with wads of cash.
More

Clark County jail to earn $60,000 from allowing TV show to film

February 22, 2016
 Associated Press
A sheriff in southern Indiana says he'll use $60,000 earned from letting a cable television show film in jail for training and equipment upgrades.
More

15 semifinalists selected for Supreme Court vacancy

February 19, 2016
Dave Stafford
The Indiana Judicial Nominating Commission on Friday selected 15 people as semifinalists to replace retiring Indiana Supreme Court Justice Brent Dickson.
More

Medical malpractice complaint moves forward

February 19, 2016
Scott Roberts
A man will have his medical malpractice complaint heard after the Indiana Court of Appeals reversed a trial court’s decision to dismiss it.
More

Interviews conclude for Supreme Court applicants

February 19, 2016
Dave Stafford
The last of 29 applicants for a pending vacancy on the Indiana Supreme Court were interviewed Friday by the Indiana Judicial Nomination Commission, which is deliberating to reduce the number for a second round of interviews. Those semifinalists are to be announced Friday.
More

Court affirms grandparents’ rights to visitation

February 19, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed the denial of a motion which would have denied grandparents visitation rights.
More

Indianapolis family law attorney Strain dies

February 19, 2016
IL Staff
An Indianapolis solo practitioner who was active leader in bar associations died Wednesday. Jana K. Strain was 51.
More

Court reinstates father’s rights

February 19, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Supreme Court reinstated a father’s parental rights, determining there was not enough evidence to support termination.
More

Supreme Court affirms battery charges

February 19, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Supreme Court affirmed battery charges against a man who said the evidence against him was “testimonial hearsay” and violated his federal and state confrontation rights.
More

7th Circuit reverses, remands motion to suppress evidence

February 19, 2016
Scott Roberts
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals reversed the denial of a motion to suppress evidence after police found heroin in a man’s car and remanded the case to district court because the police had no probable cause to pull over the car in the first place.
More

Harper Lee, author of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird,’ dies at 89

February 19, 2016
 Bloomberg News
Harper Lee, the American writer whose book “To Kill a Mockingbird” was voted the best novel of the 20th century and became a classroom standard for the study of racial injustice in the U.S., has died. She was 89.<
More

Court reverses marijuana, nuisance convictions

February 18, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals reversed a man’s convictions after finding the probable cause affidavit did not contain enough information to support issuing a search warrant.
More

Majority finds no violation of deceased inmate's 8th Amendment rights

February 18, 2016
Scott Roberts
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed summary judgment for a correctional medical services provider in a lawsuit alleging the company violated an inmate’s Eighth Amendment rights against cruel and unusual punishment.
More

COA affirms intimidation conviction

February 18, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Appeals Court affirmed a Level 6 felony intimidation charge against Demetrius Holloway after Holloway challenged the sufficiency of the evidence supporting his conviction.
More

Court affirms murder, accessory convictions

February 18, 2016
Scott Roberts
The 7th Court of Appeals affirmed charges of first-degree murder and accessory after the fact to the murder against two federal prison inmates after each appealed the sufficiency of the evidence underlying their convictions.
More

Ex-worker's suit: Indiana plant's illegal hiring depressed wages

February 18, 2016
 Associated Press
A former employee of an Indiana pork processing plant is suing two company officials, saying they were involved in knowingly hiring hundreds of people who weren't in the country legally in order to keep wages low for all of the plant's workers.
More

Justice applicants conclude Day 2

February 18, 2016
Dave Stafford
A dozen lawyers and judges made their pitches for appointment to the Indiana Supreme Court Thursday as the Judicial Nominating Commission concluded the second of three days of interviews with 29 applicants.
More

Attorneys added to Marion County judicial selection committee

February 18, 2016
Jennifer Nelson
The Courts and Criminal Code Committee in the Indiana House of Representatives passed an amendment Wednesday modifying the makeup of the Marion County judicial selection committee. The amendment adds more Marion County attorneys to the committee that will send names to the governor for appointment.
More

Constitution little help to Obama bid for vote on Scalia vacancy

February 18, 2016
 Bloomberg News
President Barack Obama suggested that even the late Justice Antonin Scalia would have thought the U.S. Senate was duty-bound to consider whether to confirm his successor on the Supreme Court.
More

Texas A&M, Colts settle '12th Man' trademark suit

February 18, 2016
 Associated Press
Texas A&M University says it has reached a settlement agreement with the Indianapolis Colts in the school's federal lawsuit it says was meant to protect its "12th Man" trademark from infringement.
More

No demand futility in Biglari transactions

February 17, 2016
Scott Roberts
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals has affirmed a decision that a company did not commit demand futility during three transactions in 2013.
More

Steady increase in law firm recruiting continues

February 17, 2016
Scott Roberts
The last summer recruiting recycle for law graduates was the biggest since the recession, a report from the National Association for Law Placement found.
More

Wednesday justice applicants offer varied experience

February 17, 2016
Dave Stafford
Nine of 29 applicants to replace Chief Justice Brent Dickson were interviewed Wednesday in the first of three days of public interview sessions by the Indiana Judicial Nominating Commission.
More

Indiana Senate panel delays bill on police video

February 17, 2016
 Associated Press
An Indiana Senate panel is holding off on changing and voting on a bill allowing law enforcement agencies to withhold police video from the public.
More

Before Supreme Court nod, an intrusive interrogation

February 17, 2016
 Associated Press
White House lawyers are scouring a life's worth of information about President Barack Obama's potential picks for the Supreme Court of the United States, from the mundane to the intensely personal.
More
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  2. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  3. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

  4. For some strange reason this story, like many on this ezine that question the powerful, seems to have been released in two formats. Prior format here: http://www.theindianalawyer.com/nominees-selected-for-us-attorney-in-indiana/PARAMS/article/44263 That observed, I must note that it is quite refreshing that denizens of the great unwashed (like me) can be allowed to openly question powerful elitists at ICE MILLER who are on the public dole like Selby. Kudos to those at this ezine who understand that they cannot be mere lapdogs to the powerful and corrupt, lest freedom bleed out. If you wonder why the Senator resisted Selby, consider reading the comments here for a theory: http://www.theindianalawyer.com/nominees-selected-for-us-attorney-in-indiana/PARAMS/article/44263

  5. Why is it a crisis that people want to protect their rights themselves? The courts have a huge bias against people appearing on their own behalf and these judges and lawyers will face their maker one day and answer for their actions.

ADVERTISEMENT