Latest News

Judges reinstate administrative order to refund excessive title insurance premiums

December 19, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
After finding a trial court exceeded its authority when it reweighed evidence presented to a hearing officer regarding overcharging of title insurance premiums by several agencies, the Indiana Court of Appeals reinstated the administrative order issued by the Indiana commissioner of insurance to refund excessive premiums.
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COA orders continuation of insurer’s case against tenant

December 19, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
Because Indiana law does not currently preclude a landlord’s insurer from bringing a subrogation claim against a tenant and a landlord’s complaint established a set of circumstances under which it would be entitled to relief, the Court of Appeals reversed the grant of a tenant’s motion to dismiss. The landlord’s insurer filed a subrogation action against the tenant after a fire started on her patio.
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Justices reinstate 80-year sentence

December 19, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
Disagreeing with the Court of Appeals, which ordered a convicted child molester’s sentence cut in half, the Indiana Supreme Court reinstated John Kimbrough III’s 80-year aggregate sentence for molesting his former girlfriend’s two young daughters.
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Justices: summary judgment inappropriate on some claims in contaminated waste suit

December 19, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Supreme Court has affirmed in part and reversed in part the grant of summary judgment to various defendants involved in a landowner’s lawsuit seeking damages after a steel fabrication company deposited solid waste onto his property.
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Hospital wins on uninsured patients’ appeal of rates charged

December 19, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Supreme Court ruled in favor of a hospital’s motion to dismiss a complaint brought by uninsured patients regarding the rates charged by the hospital, finding the patients’ complaint failed to state facts on which the trial court could have granted relief.
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State could refile charges against Bunch

December 19, 2012
IL Staff
Although arson and murder charges were dismissed against Kristine Bunch Tuesday in Decatur County, prosecutors may decide to refile charges after further investigation.
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Applications being accepted for St. Joseph Superior Court

December 19, 2012
IL Staff
Those interested in joining the St. Joseph Superior bench have until Jan. 18 to apply to the court’s nominating commission. The applicant chosen will replace Judge Roland Chamblee Jr., who is retiring in March.
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Rush robing ceremony set

December 19, 2012
IL Staff
Indiana Supreme Court Justice Loretta Rush’s formal robing ceremony will take place at 10 a.m. Friday, Dec. 28 in the Supreme Court Courtroom at the Statehouse.
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Pilot iPad program expanding in Indiana General Assembly

December 19, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
The process of turning a bill into a law requires thousands of pages of paper. Even the bills that do not become laws consume stacks and stacks – literally tons – of paper each year. But the tide may be turning. A pilot project in the Indiana General Assembly is being expanded with the goal of eventually replacing all that paper with electronic copies.
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Conour court filings reveal lavish lifestyle

December 19, 2012
Dave Stafford
The ex-attorney is still without counsel in his wire fraud case and is proceeding pro se in his divorce and foreclosure cases.
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Law firms mark the season with festive in-house traditions

December 19, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
From a litigation practice party around a partner's fireplace to highly decorated offices, law firms are showing their holiday spirit.
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Powers collide in utility rate case charged by ethics scandal

December 19, 2012
Dave Stafford
Undue influence is an undercurrent of Duke Energy v. Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission case.
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Rejecting the traditional legal career path

December 19, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
Statistics may not provide a complete picture of female attorneys’ career aspirations.
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Start Page: Top 5 New Year's (IT) resolutions for 2013

December 19, 2012
Kim Brand
Make this the year you get out of the poor-productivity ditch.
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Huelat wants DTCI to address decline in experienced civil defenders statewide

December 19, 2012
Dave Stafford
Jerry Huelat brings more than 30 years of legal experience to the presidency of the Defense Trial Counsel of Indiana, the role he assumes in 2013. He hopes to broaden the organization’s membership and reinforce the importance of capable counsel statewide.
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2012 DTCI Amicus Report

December 19, 2012
From DTCI
In 2012, the Defense Trial Counsel of Indiana’s Amicus Committee participated, or is participating, in four interesting appeals, each involving support for parties seeking transfer to the Indiana Supreme Court.
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Attorneys find fulfillment helping orphans

December 19, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
Nelson Vogel, partner at Barnes & Thornburg LLP in South Bend, and Scott Weathers, attorney in Indianapolis, have never met, never crossed paths in a courtroom. Yet, both lawyers readily give their time and attention to youngsters who live in impoverished countries and mostly want just to talk and play with someone.
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Technology Untangled: Easy video security with Internet cloud camera

December 19, 2012
Stephen Bour
Today we will look at a simple and effective Web-based network video security camera from D-Link that makes it easy to remotely monitor your home or office over the Internet.
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Federal Bar Update: Rule changes, 7th Circuit procedural decisions

December 19, 2012
John Maley
As federal practitioners know, each Dec. 1 new federal rule amendments take effect. In most recent years there have been significant changes to Federal Rules of Civil Procedure each December.
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State drops charges against mom whose murder, arson convictions were overturned

December 18, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
The state has dropped charges against Kristine Bunch, the Decatur County woman who claimed she was wrongfully convicted of killing her son in a fire in 1995. Bunch was convicted in 1996 of murder and arson, but the Court of Appeals ordered a new trial this year.
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Attempted ‘hybrid’ defense delay didn’t violate speedy trial rule

December 18, 2012
Dave Stafford
A criminal defendant who filed motions on his own behalf and who also had consented to appointment of a special public defender was not denied a speedy trial when a delay of more than 70 days occurred, the Court of Appeals ruled Tuesday.
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AG’s office sues 2 foreclosure consultants

December 18, 2012
IL Staff
The Office of the Indiana Attorney General has filed lawsuits against two foreclosure consultant companies that took more than $2,600 from Indiana homeowners without providing services or refunds.
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The Star asks Supreme Court to review order to name online commenter

December 18, 2012
Dave Stafford
The Indianapolis Star has asked the Indiana Supreme Court to hear its appeal of an order that it identify an anonymous commenter who posted messages on its website that became part of a defamation suit.
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Justices order modification of sentence of convicted child caseworker to comply with plea agreement

December 17, 2012
Dave Stafford
A former child protective services caseworker convicted of sex crimes in Hamilton and Elkhart counties should have his sentence modified to comport with his plea agreement, the Indiana Supreme Court ordered.
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Justices take 6 cases, reject 26

December 17, 2012
Dave Stafford
The Indiana Supreme Court granted transfer in six of 32 cases reviewed in the week ending Dec. 14, according to the transfer disposition list posted Monday on the court website.
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  1. People have heard of Magna Carta, and not the Provisions of Oxford & Westminster. Not that anybody really cares. Today, it might be considered ethnic or racial bias to talk about the "Anglo Saxon common law." I don't even see the word English in the blurb above. Anyhow speaking of Edward I-- he was famously intolerant of diversity himself viz the Edict of Expulsion 1290. So all he did too like making parliament a permanent institution-- that all must be discredited. 100 years from now such commemorations will be in the dustbin of history.

  2. Oops, I meant discipline, not disciple. Interesting that those words share such a close relationship. We attorneys are to be disciples of the law, being disciplined to serve the law and its source, the constitutions. Do that, and the goals of Magna Carta are advanced. Do that not and Magna Carta is usurped. Do that not and you should be disciplined. Do that and you should be counted a good disciple. My experiences, once again, do not reveal a process that is adhering to the due process ideals of Magna Carta. Just the opposite, in fact. Braveheart's dying rebel (for a great cause) yell comes to mind.

  3. It is not a sign of the times that many Ind licensed attorneys (I am not) would fear writing what I wrote below, even if they had experiences to back it up. Let's take a minute to thank God for the brave Baron's who risked death by torture to tell the government that it was in the wrong. Today is a career ruination that whistleblowers risk. That is often brought on by denial of licenses or disciple for those who dare speak truth to power. Magna Carta says truth rules power, power too often claims that truth matters not, only Power. Fight such power for the good of our constitutional republics. If we lose them we have only bureaucratic tyranny to pass onto our children. Government attorneys, of all lawyers, should best realize this and work to see our patrimony preserved. I am now a government attorney (once again) in Kansas, and respecting the rule of law is my passion, first and foremost.

  4. I have dealt with more than a few I-465 moat-protected government attorneys and even judges who just cannot seem to wrap their heads around the core of this 800 year old document. I guess monarchial privileges and powers corrupt still ..... from an academic website on this fantastic "treaty" between the King and the people ... "Enduring Principles of Liberty Magna Carta was written by a group of 13th-century barons to protect their rights and property against a tyrannical king. There are two principles expressed in Magna Carta that resonate to this day: "No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned, disseised, outlawed, banished, or in any way destroyed, nor will We proceed against or prosecute him, except by the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land." "To no one will We sell, to no one will We deny or delay, right or justice." Inspiration for Americans During the American Revolution, Magna Carta served to inspire and justify action in liberty’s defense. The colonists believed they were entitled to the same rights as Englishmen, rights guaranteed in Magna Carta. They embedded those rights into the laws of their states and later into the Constitution and Bill of Rights. The Fifth Amendment to the Constitution ("no person shall . . . be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.") is a direct descendent of Magna Carta's guarantee of proceedings according to the "law of the land." http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/magna_carta/

  5. I'm not sure what's more depressing: the fact that people would pay $35,000 per year to attend an unaccredited law school, or the fact that the same people "are hanging in there and willing to follow the dean’s lead in going forward" after the same school fails to gain accreditation, rendering their $70,000 and counting education worthless. Maybe it's a good thing these people can't sit for the bar.

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