Focus

Undocumented worker's injury suit puts major issues before justices

November 2, 2016
Dave Stafford
An undocumented immigrant’s workplace injury — and how much he may be entitled to — has put the rising number of foreign-born workers, the rights they can expect, and the responsibilities of employers squarely before the Indiana Supreme Court.
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Bouncing back from the bust

November 2, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
Hammered in the recession, real estate law now faces competition from nonlawyers as well as the need to attract new faces.
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Proposed IRS regulation a taxing matter for relatives

October 19, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
Proposed regulations from the Internal Revenue Service confirm that blood is thicker than water, but estate planning attorneys say the new rules could hand family-owned businesses much higher tax bills simply because they are family.
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With Prince’s intestate death, estate lawyers see need to educate

June 1, 2016
Dave Stafford
The apparent intestate death of Prince Rogers Nelson, who left an estate widely reported to be worth up to $300 million, prompted several Indiana lawyers to blog about their connection to his music and also use the opportunity to educate people about what happens when someone dies without a will or estate plan.
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Laurin: Liquidated damages provisions: enforceable or a penalty?

April 6, 2016
When litigating the enforceability of liquidated damages provisions, the issue is almost always whether the provision is in reality an unenforceable penalty.
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Waterfill: EEOC alleges gender discrimination in 2 suits

March 23, 2016
Mark Waterfill
In light of development in gender discrimination cases, what should wise employment counsel advise clients to do?
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Vlink: Should unions charge free-rider fees for grievances?

March 23, 2016
David VlinkMore

ABA push boosts Uniform Bar Exam

February 24, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
During the 2016 American Bar Association Midyear Meeting in early February, the House of Delegates passed a resolution encouraging states to adopt the Uniform Bar Examination. The test, administered by the National Conference of Bar Examiners, has already been adopted in 19 states and the District of Columbia.
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Legal education at what cost?

February 24, 2016
Dave Stafford
The economic storm of recent years was particularly perilous for the legal industry and law schools, but despite encouraging signs, former Indiana Chief Justice Randall Shepard said the dangers have not passed.
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Disciplinary Actions - 2/24/16

February 24, 2016
IL Staff
Read who recently resigned from the bar and who was suspended.
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Study commission repeal endangering probate code needs

January 27, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
Since the Probate Code Study Commission was eliminated as part of a 2014 law that reduced the number of interim study committees, certain legislators and attorneys have mounted an effort to get the commission reinstated.
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Collaborative divorce use lagging in Indiana

January 13, 2016
Dave Stafford
Lea Shelemey learned about collaborative divorce a dozen years ago when she heard what lawyers were doing in her native Alberta, Canada. She’s been sold ever since, but she wishes more lawyers were trained in the process and more clients were willing to take the option
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Married lesbian couples seek birth certificate equality

January 13, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
Lesbian couples in Indiana are learning the fight for state recognition did not stop with the legalization of same-sex marriage. The battle now has moved to parenthood.
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Ringlespaugh: Custody issues for parents of special-needs children

January 13, 2016
When deciding child custody in a situation involving a child with special needs, it is important for the courts, parents and attorneys to consider how these situations differ from families that do not have children with disabilities.
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Ryznar: Grandparent visitation 15 years after Troxel

January 13, 2016
Margaret Ryznar
Given continued high levels of divorce and out-of-wedlock births, the role of grandparents continues to be an important source of stability in some families. Thus, in 2015, grandparent visitation made several appearances on the Indiana court dockets.
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Trust and the troubled child

October 21, 2015
Dave Stafford
Estate planning attorneys occasionally draw the strong-willed client who wants to leave money to an heir – but only if the kid sobers up, quits getting in trouble with the law, gets a job, stops living beyond his means, or changes behavior in some other way.
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Method to the mediation

October 7, 2015
Dave Stafford
When "reason leaves the room," an analytical approach can lead a path to dispute resolution.
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First TDSIC tracker petition short circuits, but power turned on

September 23, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Three months after legislation was approved at the Indiana Statehouse allowing utility companies to pass along the costs of upgrading their infrastructure to consumers, Northern Indiana Public Service Co. took the new law out for a test drive.
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Indianapolis lawyer to advocate for attorneys as ISBA president

September 9, 2015
Teryn Armstrong
On Oct. 9, Carol Adinamis will become the third woman to serve as president of the Indiana State Bar Association in its 119-year history.
More

ISBA sets schedule for annual meeting in October

September 9, 2015
IBJ Staff
Indiana attorneys are invited to the 119th Annual Meeting of the Indiana State Bar Association where they can learn and network with their colleagues from across the state. The event will be Oct. 7-9 at the French Lick Resort in French Lick, Indiana.
More

Leadership Academy project focuses on health, wellness

September 9, 2015
Catherine Clements, Colin Connor, Traci Cosby
the Indiana State Bar Association Leadership Development Academy Class IV strives to promote and educate our colleagues on attorney wellness through a CLE, which will be presented during the ISBA annual meeting at the French Lick Resort Oct. 7-9.
More

Advertising rule would put lawyers on notice of violations

September 9, 2015
Dave Stafford
The House of Delegates will consider three advertising rule changes next month, including a proposal that would give the Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission the option of sending a warning to an attorney whose ads may violate Rules of Professional Conduct.
More

Unconscious bias impact focus of ISBA presentation

September 9, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Kimberly Papillon, a California attorney and expert in the area of implicit bias, will be presenting her program, The Neuroscience of Legal and Judicial Decision Making, at the ISBA annual meeting. It will explore the things that can unconsciously interfere with how an individual makes decisions.
More

Law professor’s book spotlights service workers’ fight for unions

August 26, 2015
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law professor Fran Quigley's book, “If We Can Win Here: The New Front Lines of the Labor Movement,” examines how the push for higher wages and better working conditions is playing out in the very red Hoosier state.
More

Doubt means don’t: Drafting an effective social media policy

August 26, 2015
Stephanie Cassman, Nabeela Virjee
Because social media is a relatively new phenomenon, employers have been wading into uncharted territories when creating and implementing social media policies.
More
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  1. California Sex Offender Management Board (CASOMB) End of Year Report 2014. (page 13) Under the current system many local registering agencies are challenged just keeping up with registration paperwork. It takes an hour or more to process each registrant, the majority of whom are low risk offenders. As a result law enforcement cannot monitor higher risk offenders more intensively in the community due to the sheer numbers on the registry. Some of the consequences of lengthy and unnecessary registration requirements actually destabilize the life’s of registrants and those -such as families- whose lives are often substantially impacted. Such consequences are thought to raise levels of known risk factors while providing no discernible benefit in terms of community safety. The full report is available online at. http://www.casomb.org/index.cfm?pid=231 National Institute of Justice (NIJ) US Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs United States of America. The overall conclusion is that Megan’s law has had no demonstrated effect on sexual offenses in New Jersey, calling into question the justification for start-up and operational costs. Megan’s Law has had no effect on time to first rearrest for known sex offenders and has not reduced sexual reoffending. Neither has it had an impact on the type of sexual reoffense or first-time sexual offense. The study also found that the law had not reduced the number of victims of sexual offenses. The full report is available online at. https://www.ncjrs.gov/app/publications/abstract.aspx? ID=247350 The University of Chicago Press for The Booth School of Business of the University of Chicago and The University of Chicago Law School Article DOI: 10.1086/658483 Conclusion. The data in these three data sets do not strongly support the effectiveness of sex offender registries. The national panel data do not show a significant decrease in the rate of rape or the arrest rate for sexual abuse after implementation of a registry via the Internet. The BJS data that tracked individual sex offenders after their release in 1994 did not show that registration had a significantly negative effect on recidivism. And the D.C. crime data do not show that knowing the location of sex offenders by census block can help protect the locations of sexual abuse. This pattern of noneffectiveness across the data sets does not support the conclusion that sex offender registries are successful in meeting their objectives of increasing public safety and lowering recidivism rates. The full report is available online at. http://www.jstor.org/stable/full/10.1086/658483 These are not isolated conclusions but are the same outcomes in the majority of conclusions and reports on this subject from multiple government agencies and throughout the academic community. People, including the media and other organizations should not rely on and reiterate the statements and opinions of the legislators or other people as to the need for these laws because of the high recidivism rates and the high risk offenders pose to the public which simply is not true and is pure hyperbole and fiction. They should rely on facts and data collected and submitted in reports from the leading authorities and credible experts in the fields such as the following. California Sex Offender Management Board (CASOMB) Sex offender recidivism rate for a new sex offense is 0.8% (page 30) The full report is available online at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Adult_Research_Branch/Research_Documents/2014_Outcome_Evaluation_Report_7-6-2015.pdf California Sex Offender Management Board (CASOMB) (page 38) Sex offender recidivism rate for a new sex offense is 1.8% The full report is available online at. http://www.google.com/url?sa= t&source=web&cd=1&ved= 0CCEQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F% 2Fwww.cdcr.ca.gov%2FAdult_ Research_Branch%2FResearch_ documents%2FOutcome_ evaluation_Report_2013.pdf&ei= C9dSVePNF8HfoATX-IBo&usg=AFQjCNE9I6ueHz-o2mZUnuxLPTyiRdjDsQ Bureau of Justice Statistics 5 PERCENT OF SEX OFFENDERS REARRESTED FOR ANOTHER SEX CRIME WITHIN 3 YEARS OF PRISON RELEASE WASHINGTON, D.C. Within 3 years following their 1994 state prison release, 5.3 percent of sex offenders (men who had committed rape or sexual assault) were rearrested for another sex crime, the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) announced today. The full report is available online at. http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/press/rsorp94pr.cfm Document title; A Model of Static and Dynamic Sex Offender Risk Assessment Author: Robert J. McGrath, Michael P. Lasher, Georgia F. Cumming Document No.: 236217 Date Received: October 2011 Award Number: 2008-DD-BX-0013 Findings: Study of 759 adult male offenders under community supervision Re-arrest rate: 4.6% after 3-year follow-up The sexual re-offense rates for the 746 released in 2005 are much lower than what many in the public have been led to expect or believe. These low re-offense rates appear to contradict a conventional wisdom that sex offenders have very high sexual re-offense rates. The full report is available online at. https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/236217.pdf Document Title: SEX OFFENDER SENTENCING IN WASHINGTON STATE: RECIDIVISM RATES BY: Washington State Institute For Public Policy. A study of 4,091 sex offenders either released from prison or community supervision form 1994 to 1998 and examined for 5 years Findings: Sex Crime Recidivism Rate: 2.7% Link to Report: http://www.oncefallen.com/files/Washington_SO_Recid_2005.pdf Document Title: Indiana’s Recidivism Rates Decline for Third Consecutive Year BY: Indiana Department of Correction 2009. The recidivism rate for sex offenders returning on a new sex offense was 1.05%, one of the lowest in the nation. In a time when sex offenders continue to face additional post-release requirements that often result in their return to prison for violating technical rules such as registration and residency restrictions, the instances of sex offenders returning to prison due to the commitment of a new sex crime is extremely low. Findings: sex offenders returning on a new sex offense was 1.05% Link to Report: http://www.in.gov/idoc/files/RecidivismRelease.pdf Once again, These are not isolated conclusions but are the same outcomes in the majority of reports on this subject from multiple government agencies and throughout the academic community. No one can doubt that child sexual abuse is traumatic and devastating. The question is not whether the state has an interest in preventing such harm, but whether current laws are effective in doing so. Megan’s law is a failure and is destroying families and their children’s lives and is costing tax payers millions upon millions of dollars. The following is just one example of the estimated cost just to implement SORNA which many states refused to do. From Justice Policy Institute. Estimated cost to implement SORNA Here are some of the estimates made in 2009 expressed in 2014 current dollars: California, $66M; Florida, $34M; Illinois, $24M; New York, $35M; Pennsylvania, $22M; Texas, $44M. In 2014 dollars, Virginia’s estimate for implementation was $14M, and the annual operating cost after that would be $10M. For the US, the total is $547M. That’s over half a billion dollars – every year – for something that doesn’t work. http://www.justicepolicy.org/images/upload/08-08_FAC_SORNACosts_JJ.pdf. Attempting to use under-reporting to justify the existence of the registry is another myth, or a lie. This is another form of misinformation perpetrated by those who either have a fiduciary interest in continuing the unconstitutional treatment of a disfavored group or are seeking to justify their need for punishment for people who have already paid for their crime by loss of their freedom through incarceration and are now attempting to reenter society as honest citizens. When this information is placed into the public’s attention by naive media then you have to wonder if the media also falls into one of these two groups that are not truly interested in reporting the truth. Both of these groups of people that have that type of mentality can be classified as vigilantes, bullies, or sociopaths, and are responsible for the destruction of our constitutional values and the erosion of personal freedoms in this country. I think the media or other organizations need to do a in depth investigation into the false assumptions and false data that has been used to further these laws and to research all the collateral damages being caused by these laws and the unconstitutional injustices that are occurring across the country. They should include these injustices in their report so the public can be better informed on what is truly happening in this country on this subject. Thank you for your time.

  2. Freedom as granted in the Constitution cannot be summarily disallowed without Due Process. Unable to to to the gym, church, bowling alley? What is this 1984 level nonsense? Congrats to Brian for having the courage to say that this was enough! and Congrats to the ACLU on the win!

  3. America's hyper-phobia about convicted sex offenders must end! Politicians must stop pandering to knee-jerk public hysteria. And the public needs to learn the facts. Research by the California Sex Offender Management Board as shown a recidivism rate for convicted sex offenders of less than 1%. Less than 1%! Furthermore, research shows that by year 17 after their conviction, a convicted sex offender is no more likely to commit a new sex offense than any other member of the public. Put away your torches and pitchforks. Get the facts. Stop hysteria.

  4. He was convicted 23 years ago. How old was he then? He probably was a juvenile. People do stupid things, especially before their brain is fully developed. Why are we continuing to punish him in 2016? If he hasn't re-offended by now, it's very, very unlikely he ever will. He paid for his mistake sufficiently. Let him live his life in peace.

  5. This year, Notre Dame actually enrolled an equal amount of male and female students.

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