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Knox County Bar memorializes lawyer

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Bar Crawl is Indiana Lawyer’s section highlighting bar association news around the state. We try to include bar association news and trends in our regular stories, but we want to include more news from specialty and county bars. If you’d like to submit an update about your bar association or a photo from an event your bar association has hosted to Indiana Lawyer, or if you have questions about having your bar association news included in the newspaper, please send it to Rebecca Berfanger, rberfanger@ibj.com, along with contact information for any follow up questions at least two weeks in advance of the issue date.

The Knox County Bar Association adopted a resolution to memorialize former Indiana State Bar Association president E. Rabb Emison in mid-November. Emison died in September. He was 85.

“Although he was widely known and honored, Rabb had a special love for his community and the lawyers he practiced with and against all of whom were treated with respect and unfailing courtesy,” the resolution stated. “Rabb’s quick wit, infectious smile, and enthusiasm for life enriched all of us who knew him.

“Retired from the active practice of law, Rabb continued his community involvement working tirelessly for projects that would benefit Vincennes and Knox County. He was instrumental in getting the Walnut Grove project adjacent to the William Henry Harrison Mansion to become a reality.

“The Knox County Bar, indeed Knox County and Vincennes, will miss E. Rabb Emison. It does hereby extend its collective condolences to Kathleen, Susan, Anne, and Gordon, and to all members of the extended Emison family. Rabb was a genuinely unique person who will not be easily forgotten.

“Now, therefore, be it resolved that the Knox County Bar Association hereby memorializes in perpetuity the life and accomplishments of E. Rabb Emison and extends to each member of his family its expression of sympathy and loss,” the resolution stated.

In the resolution, the bar association also recognized Emison for his contributions to the ISBA, of which he served as president from 1986 to 1987. He was perhaps best known for his efforts to improve diversity in the Indiana legal community. An ISBA award was named for him and is given to other attorneys who follow his lead.

The resolution also mentions the more than 50 columns he wrote for the ISBA publication “Res Gestae.” Those columns were unlike others because instead of writing about the law, he wrote about how to be a better lawyer.•

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  1. First comment on this thread is a fitting final comment on this thread, as that the MCBA never answered Duncan's fine question, and now even Eric Holder agrees that the MCBA was in material error as to the facts: "I don't get it" from Duncan December 1, 2014 5:10 PM "The Grand Jury met for 25 days and heard 70 hours of testimony according to this article and they made a decision that no crime occurred. On what basis does the MCBA conclude that their decision was "unjust"? What special knowledge or evidence does the MCBA have that the Grand Jury hearing this matter was unaware of? The system that we as lawyers are sworn to uphold made a decision that there was insufficient proof that officer committed a crime. How can any of us say we know better what was right than the jury that actually heard all of the the evidence in this case."

  2. wow is this a bunch of bs! i know the facts!

  3. MCBA .... time for a new release about your entire membership (or is it just the alter ego) being "saddened and disappointed" in the failure to lynch a police officer protecting himself in the line of duty. But this time against Eric Holder and the Federal Bureau of Investigation: "WASHINGTON — Justice Department lawyers will recommend that no civil rights charges be brought against the police officer who fatally shot an unarmed teenager in Ferguson, Mo., after an F.B.I. investigation found no evidence to support charges, law enforcement officials said Wednesday." http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/22/us/justice-department-ferguson-civil-rights-darren-wilson.html?ref=us&_r=0

  4. Dr wail asfour lives 3 hours from the hospital,where if he gets an emergency at least he needs three hours,while even if he is on call he should be in a location where it gives him max 10 minutes to be beside the patient,they get paid double on their on call days ,where look how they handle it,so if the death of the patient occurs on weekend and these doctors still repeat same pattern such issue should be raised,they should be closer to the patient.on other hand if all the death occured on the absence of the Dr and the nurses handle it,the nurses should get trained how to function appearntly they not that good,if the Dr lives 3 hours far from the hospital on his call days he should sleep in the hospital

  5. It's a capital offense...one for you Latin scholars..

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