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Labor and employment attorney named 2013 Legendary Lawyer

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Retired Indianapolis attorney Henry C. Ryder has been selected to receive the Indiana Bar Foundation’s 2013 Legendary Lawyer Award.

The Legendary Lawyer Award recognizes an IBF fellow whose contributions have demonstrated the highest standards of the legal profession. The honoree upholds the principles and traditions of the legal profession as well as shows compassion through community service and a legal career of 50 years or more.

Ryder practiced law for 54 years, retiring eight years ago. He specialized in representing management in labor relations and employment matters as a founding partner of Roberts & Ryder and as a partner and of counsel at Barnes & Thornburg LLP.

He retired from Barnes & Thornburg eight years ago.

After graduating from Purdue University in 1948, Ryder enrolled in the University of Michigan Law School and graduated in 1951. He served two years as an officer during the Korean War before joining the Indianapolis law firm of Buschmann Krieg DeVault and Alexander in 1953.

In 1960, Ryder and his colleague William E. Roberts founded Roberts & Ryder. They focused on the budding field of labor and employment law. Ryder’s practice included a significant presence in state and federal courts, the National Labor Relations Board, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Office of Federal Contract Compliance, and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, along with other state and local agencies.

Ryder’s civic activities include serving as a trustee at Purdue University and Hanover College in addition to being the first chairman and member of the IUPUI Library Advisory Board.

Ryder has recently rejuvenated efforts of the Indiana State Bar Association’s senior lawyers section. He also conceived and developed a process for preparation and preservation of oral histories of Indiana legendary lawyers and judges.

For the past 30 years, Ryder has brought James Whitcomb Riley to life by personifying the Hoosier poet in schools, libraries, service clubs and even making a regular appearance at the Indiana State Fair.

Ryder will receive the Legendary Lawyer Award at a special reception being held from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Sept. 6 at Barnes & Thornburg in downtown Indianapolis. To reserve a seat, contact the IBF at 317-269-2415.

Anyone wishing to send memories or stories honoring Ryder may send them to the foundation either by email to Theresa Browning, director of development and communications, at tbrowning@inbf.org or by mail to the Indiana Bar Foundation, 230 E. Ohio St., Suite 400, Indianapolis, IN 46204. The deadline for submissions is Aug. 30.
 

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