Latest News

Lawyers crowdfunding for UK legal action

June 29, 2016
 Associated Press
U.K. attorneys have raised more than 10,000 pounds ($13,000) to fund the opening salvo in what may be a multifaceted legal fight over the ins and outs of how Britain leaves the European Union.
More

Women sue Beech Grove after city blocked Facebook activity

June 29, 2016
Scott Roberts
The American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana has filed a lawsuit on behalf of two women against the city of Beech Grove after the city removed comments the two women wrote on Facebook posts the city and police department had made.
More

Indiana man gets 3 years for bomb threat to avoid court

June 29, 2016
 Associated Press
An Anderson man has been sentenced to three years in prison for phoning a bomb threat to the Madison County Clerk's office last month to avoid a court hearing.
More

COA: Minors’ malpractice suit can continue

June 29, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals ruled a medical malpractice lawsuit filed by minor children can continue after it found the suit was not untimely filed. The children were in the correct age range to trigger an exception in the Medical Malpractice Act.
More

COA: Death during robbery is felony murder

June 29, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals found evidence was sufficient to uphold a robber’s conviction of felony murder after one of his accomplices was killed in a fight with a robbery victim.
More

Law firms’ March Against Hunger raises nearly $60,000

June 29, 2016
IL Staff
Law firms from around Indiana led the way in the Indiana State Bar Association’s annual March Against Hunger campaign, raising $59,408 in cash donations and 7,560 pounds of food to provide to the state’s 11 regional food banks.
More

7th Circuit affirms judgment for employee on ADA claim

June 29, 2016
Scott Roberts
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed judgment for an employee who claimed the city of Anderson did not accommodate his disability when it fired him for not having a commercial driver’s license he could no longer get because of his diabetes.
More

Valparaiso Law School reduces faculty, class size to prepare for a different future

June 29, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
Valparaiso Law School is hardly the first to feel the pain of falling student applications, but as the subject of a recent profile in the New York Times, its troubles may be the most well-known.
More

Deadline for mandatory e-filing nears for Hamilton County, Indiana appellate courts

June 29, 2016
Dave Stafford
Ready or not, the era of e-filing begins July 1 for everyone submitting court documents in Hamilton County and in Indiana’s appellate courts. There’s evidence that despite the buildup over recent months, many lawyers and filers may be caught off guard.
More

Are old convictions still relevant?

June 29, 2016
Dave Stafford
A man who admitted fault and negligence for a Lake County drunken-driving crash is appealing damages of $2 million awarded in the case, claiming the jury was wrongly provided evidence of his prior alcohol-related driving convictions that were 17 and 30 years old.
More

Prosecutors say ethics rules limit release of police body camera video

June 29, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
While it was being considered in the Statehouse, Indiana’s police body camera law brought a lot of public interest and at times public outcry. But as the new measure gets ready for action, prosecutors say the Rules of Professional Conduct restrict them from releasing the recordings.
More

Attorneys remember trailblazer Susan Tabler

June 29, 2016
Scott Roberts
The recent death of an Indianapolis attorney who helped blaze the trail for female attorneys in the city has prompted other attorneys to take a look how far women have come in the legal profession.
More

Strained Adult Protective Services to get relief July 1, but stakeholders seek more aid

June 29, 2016
Dave Stafford
Adult Protective Services has only 28 investigators to look into reports of mistreatment of endangered Hoosiers, along with 18 district directors. The Indiana Family and Social Services Administration has pledged to release funds July 1 to hire 18 more investigators. 
More

Pilot program to help judges with complex motions

June 29, 2016
Scott Roberts
Judges in four Indiana counties soon will have some help with complex motions thanks to a bill passed by the Indiana Legislature.
More

Employers struggle with complicated immigration system

June 29, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
At the third meeting of the Senate Select Committee on Immigration Issues, business professionals and attorneys told committee members the measures Indiana has adopted in recent years have actually hurt the state’s economy and public safety.
More

New Indiana laws begin July 1

June 29, 2016
IL Staff
Read a complete list of the laws that will become effective July 1.
More

Adams: Setting standards for 'silver tsunami' preparedness

June 29, 2016
A popular topic in the media lately is the “silver tsunami” — the huge wave of baby boomers who will leave the workforce in the coming years and become eligible for the senior discount. The legal system needs to prepare today for the influx of issues that will wash ashore.
More

Attorneys create for-profit guardianship company

June 29, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
After about a year of thinking and planning, two Indianapolis attorneys launched Scout Guardianship Services Inc. in December 2015. This for-profit business can function as either a guardian, attorney in fact or health care representative for adults who want and have the financial assets to pay for these services.
More

Editorial: Modest proposal to state, IBM lawyers: Settle for nothing

June 29, 2016
IL Staff
Six years have passed since Indiana sued IBM over the failed $1 billion contract for the computer giant to modernize a punch-card-era system for determining welfare eligibility. After the contract was famously canceled, IBM blamed the state, the state blamed IBM, and they’ve been fighting in court since.
More

Hammond: Loss of love and companionship: Tough love for minors

June 29, 2016
The situation: a single mother is killed in a crash leaving behind a young daughter. The defense attorney refuses to consider paying any damages to the young daughter beyond her 18th birthday, including for the loss of love, care and affection of her deceased mother. Can that be right?
More

Cotterill: Commercial courts will enhance economic development

June 29, 2016
Indiana’s judiciary has been added to the long list of what makes Indiana so favorable a place to do business.
More

Start Page: Clear your Outlook inbox, clear your mind

June 29, 2016
Seth Wilson
Unfortunately, leaving emails unprocessed in your inbox waiting for you drains your energy, causes you to procrastinate, and takes up mental capacity. Thankfully, there’s a better way to deal with email. It’s called getting to “Inbox Zero.”
More

Hammerle on…'Finding Dory,' 'Weiner'

June 29, 2016
Robert Hammerle
Abandoned by my two grandchildren and Saudi foreign exchange student, I was forced to bite the bullet and go alone to see “Finding Dory.”
More

New state law allows distilleries to sell carryout 7 days a week

June 29, 2016
Indianapolis Business Journal, Lesley Weidenbener
A new state law that takes effect July 1 lifts the ban on carryout sales for artisan distilleries, putting the businesses on par with wineries and craft breweries, which already sell alcohol on Sundays.
More

VW settlement could return $66M to eligible Hoosiers

June 28, 2016
IL Staff
More than 6,600 Hoosiers who bought certain Volkswagens or Audis designed to defraud diesel emissions tests may receive cash compensation, have their cars bought back or their engines modified. Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller announced Tuesday that restitution for eligible Indiana consumers could reach $66 million.
More
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

  2. MELISA EVA VALUE INVESTMENT Greetings to you from Melisa Eva Value Investment. We offer Business and Personal loans, it is quick and easy and hence can be availed without any hassle. We do not ask for any collateral or guarantors while approving these loans and hence these loans require minimum documentation. We offer great and competitive interest rates of 2% which do not weigh you down too much. These loans have a comfortable pay-back period. Apply today by contacting us on E-mail: melisaeva9@gmail.com WE DO NOT ASK FOR AN UPFRONT FEE. BEWARE OF SCAMMERS AND ONLINE FRAUD.

  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

ADVERTISEMENT