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Hammerle on ... 'Fruitvale Station' and 'The Conjuring'

August 14, 2013
Robert Hammerle
In this issue, Robert Hammerle reviews "Fruitvale Station" and "The Conjuring."
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Sidebars: Local burger joint leaves litigator underwhelmed

August 14, 2013
Jennifer Lukemeyer, Fred Vaiana
Sidebars reviews and rates eateries lawyers may enjoy visiting when working at courthouses throughout Indiana. Fred offers this week’s review of Punch Burger.
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Pending petition for child support becomes applicable after Legislature amends statute

August 13, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
A trial court will have to reconsider its ruling in a child support dispute in light of a state law that was changed while an appeal of the case was pending.
 
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Observation and training provided 'reasonable suspicion' to conduct traffic stop

August 13, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
A man’s voluntary confession that he was a habitual traffic violator is admissible even though he had not broken any laws when the sheriff’s deputy pulled him over.
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Man may be retried on sex charge, but state may not amend

August 13, 2013
Dave Stafford
A man acquitted on a rape charge but whose charge of sexual misconduct with a minor ended in a hung jury and mistrial may be retried, but not on a count the state sought to amend, the Court of Appeals ruled Tuesday.
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Denial of recorded Vanderburgh ‘river camps’ lots affirmed

August 13, 2013
Dave Stafford
“River camps” along the Ohio River that date back to the 1930s may not be divided as lots of record based on the testimony of longtime residents, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Tuesday, affirming a judgment of the Vanderburgh Circuit Court.
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Speedway man charged with threatening judge, attorney

August 13, 2013
Dave Stafford
A Speedway man accused of posting online death threats against a judge, an attorney and others has been charged in federal court, according to a statement from the office of Joe Hogsett, U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Indiana.
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Teachers union could pay $14M to schools under settlement

August 13, 2013
IBJ Staff, J.K. Wall
The state’s largest teachers union and its national parent organization have agreed to pay $14 million under a tentative settlement announced Tuesday morning by Indiana Secretary of State Connie Lawson and Indiana Securities Commissioner Chris Naylor.
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Ex-IURC leader’s criminal charges dropped

August 12, 2013
Dave Stafford
The former chairman of the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission won’t face trial on felony charges stemming from an ethics scandal at the agency, a judge ruled Monday.
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Indiana Senate President takes call for Constitutional Convention to national audiences

August 12, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana Senate President Pro Tem David Long, R-Fort Wayne, is pushing for an Article V Constitutional Convention by speaking at national meetings and trying to garner support beyond Indiana.
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Complaint: Wabash realtor faked court papers, intimidated renters

August 12, 2013
Dave Stafford
A northern Indiana realtor faked court papers in an attempt to intimidate renters and collect from them, according to a complaint from the attorney general’s office filed Thursday.
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Ineffective counsel claim sufficient to overcome waiver in plea agreement

August 12, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Despite a man’s plea agreement in which he waived his right to challenge his conviction under 28 U.S.C. 2255, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled he can seek to have his conviction overturned because the 2255 waiver does not bar his claim that his trial counsel was ineffective.
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Tax Court: Miller Pipeline lacks support for summary judgment

August 12, 2013
Dave Stafford
An Indianapolis pipeline company must proceed to trial in its bid to earn a refund of sales and use taxes, Senior Judge Thomas Fisher ruled for Indiana Tax Court.
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Conour, government agree to sale of assets

August 12, 2013
Dave Stafford
Convicted former attorney William Conour’s possessions in his foreclosed Carmel home, including original artwork and a collection of premium wine and champagne, could be sold with proceeds directed toward a court fund established for victim restitution according to a joint motion  filed in federal court.
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In tossing discrimination case, 7th Circuit confronts state immunity claims

August 9, 2013
Dave Stafford
An Indiana Department of Health lab worker’s claim that he was fired because of his age, race or gender was rightly rejected by the District Court, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Friday.
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IU Maurer law professor Craig Bradley dies

August 9, 2013
IL Staff
Craig Bradley, a longtime professor at Indiana University Maurer School of Law in Bloomington, died Wednesday. He was 67.
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Time spent in federal custody does not interfere with right to speedy trial

August 9, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
A defendant’s repeated incarcerations in other jurisdictions did not interfere with his right to a speedy trial in Indiana.
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Burglary, criminal mischief sentences double jeopardy, split COA rules

August 9, 2013
Dave Stafford
A man ordered to serve 18 years in prison will be resentenced after an Indiana Court of Appeals panel ruled Friday that his convictions of Class C felony burglary and Class A misdemeanor criminal mischief constituted double jeopardy.
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Indiana law firms named among best for women

August 9, 2013
IL Staff
Three law firms based in Indiana or with offices in the state are among the 50 Best Law Firms for Women in the annual list compiled by Working Mother and consulting firm Flex-Time Lawyers LLC.

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Single sewer lien not enough to bring foreclosure

August 8, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
Despite liens against their respective properties, two homeowners will be able to keep their properties out of the county tax sale.
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McKinney student to take final tee shot to end 2,900-mile journey

August 8, 2013
Marilyn Odendahl
After 96 days of whacking a golf ball, Luke Bielawski will hit a final shot into the Atlantic Ocean Saturday.
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Judge: Conour to stay behind bars before sentencing

August 8, 2013
Dave Stafford
Former attorney William Conour will remain jailed pending his sentencing in a little more than two months, a federal judge has ruled.
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Justices revive malpractice suit alleging doctor’s failure to warn patient not to drive

August 8, 2013
Dave Stafford
A medical malpractice suit arising from a debilitating head-on automobile crash should not have been disposed of through summary judgment in favor of the doctor, the Indiana Supreme Court ruled Thursday. Justices reversed the order and sent the case back to the trial court.
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Dispute over Uptown Business Center in SoBro gets messier

August 7, 2013
Scott Olson, IBJ Staff
A months-long court feud over a retail building at the southwest corner of 49th Street and College Avenue in Indianapolis has become even more heated now that the owner has sought bankruptcy in an attempt to delay foreclosure on the structure.
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Judge tosses one of two stent patent suits against Cook Medical

August 7, 2013
Dave Stafford
A federal judge Wednesday dismissed a patent dispute case against Cook Medical Inc. of Bloomington, but a Texas corporation continues to press its claim that the device maker infringed its patents on blood vessel stents and grafts.
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  1. People have heard of Magna Carta, and not the Provisions of Oxford & Westminster. Not that anybody really cares. Today, it might be considered ethnic or racial bias to talk about the "Anglo Saxon common law." I don't even see the word English in the blurb above. Anyhow speaking of Edward I-- he was famously intolerant of diversity himself viz the Edict of Expulsion 1290. So all he did too like making parliament a permanent institution-- that all must be discredited. 100 years from now such commemorations will be in the dustbin of history.

  2. Oops, I meant discipline, not disciple. Interesting that those words share such a close relationship. We attorneys are to be disciples of the law, being disciplined to serve the law and its source, the constitutions. Do that, and the goals of Magna Carta are advanced. Do that not and Magna Carta is usurped. Do that not and you should be disciplined. Do that and you should be counted a good disciple. My experiences, once again, do not reveal a process that is adhering to the due process ideals of Magna Carta. Just the opposite, in fact. Braveheart's dying rebel (for a great cause) yell comes to mind.

  3. It is not a sign of the times that many Ind licensed attorneys (I am not) would fear writing what I wrote below, even if they had experiences to back it up. Let's take a minute to thank God for the brave Baron's who risked death by torture to tell the government that it was in the wrong. Today is a career ruination that whistleblowers risk. That is often brought on by denial of licenses or disciple for those who dare speak truth to power. Magna Carta says truth rules power, power too often claims that truth matters not, only Power. Fight such power for the good of our constitutional republics. If we lose them we have only bureaucratic tyranny to pass onto our children. Government attorneys, of all lawyers, should best realize this and work to see our patrimony preserved. I am now a government attorney (once again) in Kansas, and respecting the rule of law is my passion, first and foremost.

  4. I have dealt with more than a few I-465 moat-protected government attorneys and even judges who just cannot seem to wrap their heads around the core of this 800 year old document. I guess monarchial privileges and powers corrupt still ..... from an academic website on this fantastic "treaty" between the King and the people ... "Enduring Principles of Liberty Magna Carta was written by a group of 13th-century barons to protect their rights and property against a tyrannical king. There are two principles expressed in Magna Carta that resonate to this day: "No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned, disseised, outlawed, banished, or in any way destroyed, nor will We proceed against or prosecute him, except by the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land." "To no one will We sell, to no one will We deny or delay, right or justice." Inspiration for Americans During the American Revolution, Magna Carta served to inspire and justify action in liberty’s defense. The colonists believed they were entitled to the same rights as Englishmen, rights guaranteed in Magna Carta. They embedded those rights into the laws of their states and later into the Constitution and Bill of Rights. The Fifth Amendment to the Constitution ("no person shall . . . be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.") is a direct descendent of Magna Carta's guarantee of proceedings according to the "law of the land." http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/magna_carta/

  5. I'm not sure what's more depressing: the fact that people would pay $35,000 per year to attend an unaccredited law school, or the fact that the same people "are hanging in there and willing to follow the dean’s lead in going forward" after the same school fails to gain accreditation, rendering their $70,000 and counting education worthless. Maybe it's a good thing these people can't sit for the bar.

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