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IBF launches new donor society

April 6, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
The Indiana Bar Foundation hopes its new Keystone Society will bring in unrestricted donor dollars.
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Disability denials draw criticism

April 6, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
Seventh Circuit questions Social Security Administration’s outdated information, convoluted calculations in several recent decisions.
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Cost to shield Indiana lawmakers over emails hits $160,000

April 5, 2016
 Associated Press
The legal fight to shield Indiana lawmakers from having to release email correspondence with lobbying groups has cost taxpayers at least $160,000.
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Jury: Security firm not liable for $60M heist from Eli Lilly

April 5, 2016
 Associated Press
A security company isn't liable for the theft of more than $60 million worth of prescription drugs from pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly's warehouse in Connecticut six years ago, a federal jury in Florida says.
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Supreme Court: City not immune from injury suit

April 5, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Supreme Court ruled a city did not meet the requirements of the Indiana Tort Claims Act, and as such does not have immunity in a suit filed by a woman who fell in a city street and broke her leg.
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Supreme Court affirms second-degree murder charge, life in prison

April 5, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Supreme Court said admission of an autopsy report and testimony by a pathologist who did not complete the report was not a violation of a man’s Sixth Amendment right to cross-examination and thus affirmed the trial court’s conviction of second-degree murder.
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COA dismisses improperly filed preliminary injunction motion

April 5, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals dismissed a motion for preliminary injunction against the state’s Medicaid Fraud Control Unit filed by Pain Medicine and Rehabilitation Center and Anthony Alexander after it found PMRC’s motion in the trial court was not procedurally correct.
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Court reduces man's sentence by 3 years

April 5, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals reduced a man’s aggregate sentence by three years after it found he was denied effective assistance of counsel when his counsel did not bring up a statutory limitation issue.
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Panama lawyers at center of offshore scandal make odd couple

April 5, 2016
 Associated Press
The lawyers at the center of an uproar over the hidden financial dealings of the world's wealthy are an odd pairing of a German-born immigrant and a prize-winning Panamanian novelist whose books sometimes mirror the seedy world of politics he's come across in his work.
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How a spy probe wound up as a child pornography prosecution

April 5, 2016
 Associated Press
At issue in the case is how the government uses evidence derived through the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court and under what circumstances that information should be made available to defendants, particularly when it winds up repurposed for a routine criminal prosecution that has nothing to do with national security.
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Class-action suit challenges US government's no-fly list

April 5, 2016
 Associated Press
On Tuesday, a Muslim civil rights group filed a class-action lawsuit in federal court in Alexandria on behalf of thousands of Americans who have been placed on the terror watch list. The suit seeks unspecified monetary compensation.
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Indiana University: Sexual misconduct review finds no bias

April 5, 2016
 Associated Press
A review of sexual misconduct cases overseen by Indiana University's former student ethics director, who resigned in February amid sex assault allegations that he denies, found that those cases "were conducted without bias or undue influence," the school said Monday.
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High school student wants to change Indiana Constitution

April 5, 2016
 Associated Press
As Megan Stoner prepares for high school graduation, she is focused on finding a way to "begin her legacy" by working with legislators to author a bill that would lower the age that people are eligible to run for office from 25 to 21 in the Senate and 21 to 18 in the House of Representatives.
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National group recognizes Indiana for criminal justice reform

April 4, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
Indiana is getting a little love on social media Monday for efforts in recent years to reform its criminal justice system. The U.S. Justice Action Network is including the Hoosier state in its national campaign “30 States, 30 Days” to prompt Congress to pass legislation reforming the federal justice system.
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Launch of Marion County online transcript service delayed

April 4, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Marion Circuit and Superior Courts have postponed implementation of TheRecordXchange, an Internet-based transcript ordering and production management platform.
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Judge denies class action in NCAA scholarship suit

April 4, 2016
Dave Stafford
A former college football quarterback who sued the NCAA over its former scholarship policy doesn’t meet the requirements for certification of a class-action suit against the Indianapolis-based organization, a federal judge ruled.
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Supreme Court will take up case about juror’s racial bias

April 4, 2016
 Associated Press
U.S. Supreme Court takes case over whether a juror's allegedly racially charged comments can open jury deliberations.
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Jury finds South Bend teen convicted of murder had gang ties

April 4, 2016
 Associated Press
South Bend jury finds teenager convicted of murder should have sentence enhanced for criminal gang activity.
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High court sides with sex offender in dispute over registry

April 4, 2016
 Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously Monday that a convicted sex offender did not have to update his status on the federal sex offender registry after moving to a foreign country.
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Indiana mandates concussion training for public coaches

April 4, 2016
 Associated Press
New Indiana law requires coaches to complete a course on spotting the symptoms of concussions. Coaches who finish the training will be granted civil immunity from being sued for student injuries.
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Court upholds total population count in electoral districts

April 4, 2016
 Associated Press
The United States Supreme Court has unanimously upheld a Texas law that counts everyone, not just eligible voters, in deciding how to draw electoral districts.
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Broker sues after Colts cancel season-ticket renewal

April 4, 2016
Anthony Schoettle
A Pennsylvania ticket broker is suing the Indianapolis Colts over their revocation of his season tickets—a legal skirmish other brokers say appears to be fallout from efforts by the team to gain greater control over the secondary market and thin the ranks of resellers.
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High court rejects challenge to Mississippi campaign finance law

April 4, 2016
 Associated Press
The Supreme Court of the United States won’t hear an appeal challenging the constitutionality of a Mississippi campaign finance law that requires reporting by people or groups spending at least $200 to support or oppose a ballot measure.
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Indianapolis house blast convict says informant set him up

April 1, 2016
 Associated Press
An Indianapolis man convicted on 53 counts in a house explosion that killed two people and devastated the southside Richmond Hill neighborhood said testimony from a jailhouse informant and undercover officer saying he tried to have a key witness killed never should have been presented at his trial.
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State appellate briefs make online debut

April 1, 2016
IL Staff
Briefs filed in Indiana appeals were made available for online for the first time Friday.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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