Latest News

Abortion case returns to Supreme Court after loss of Scalia

February 29, 2016
 Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court challenge to a Texas law that has dramatically reduced the number of abortion clinics in the state is the justices' most significant case on the hot-button issue in nearly a quarter-century.
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Appellate court filings to be put online April 1

February 29, 2016
Scott Roberts
A task force created by the Indiana Supreme Court to look into remote access and privacy of electronic records decided appellate court briefs filed by attorneys would be put online at mycase.in.gov beginning April 1.
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Valpo Law announces faculty buyouts, smaller future classes

February 26, 2016
Dave Stafford
Valparaiso University School of Law announced Friday afternoon it will offer buyouts to tenured faculty and faculty members with multi-year contracts.
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Justices reverse handgun conviction based on unreasonable impoundment

February 26, 2016
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Supreme Court on Friday reiterated its previous holding regarding impoundment of vehicles by police and reversed a man’s handgun conviction because the impoundment and subsequent inventory of his vehicle were unreasonable.
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Ex-day care worker guilty of child porn charges

February 26, 2016
IL Staff
A former employee of Children’s Choice Learning Center at St. Vincent Hospital in Indianapolis was convicted in federal court Friday of seven counts of production and attempted production of child pornography.
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Apple lays out legal arguments to resist FBI's iPhone demand

February 26, 2016
 Bloomberg News
A week after federal investigators threw down a gauntlet to Silicon Valley, Tim Cook’s lawyers have weighed in, offering cool-headed legal arguments against having  Apple Inc. unlock the iPhone used by one of the attackers who killed 14 people in San Bernardino, California, in December.
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Dow Chemical settles case citing Supreme Court uncertainty

February 26, 2016
 Associated Press
Dow Chemical says it will pay $835 million to settle a long-standing class action lawsuit, after the death of Justice Antonin Scalia decreased its chances of prevailing at the U.S. Supreme Court.
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State plans to boost staffing for adult protection agency

February 26, 2016
 Associated Press
State officials are planning to boost spending by $1.1 million for Indiana Adult Protective Services after complaints that the agency is understaffed to handle reports of possible abuse or neglect involving vulnerable adults.
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Historic courtroom illustrations acquired by Library of Congress

February 26, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
Ninety-six original courtroom drawings from high-profile trials over the past four decades have been acquired by the Library of Congress.
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Supreme Court: Ex post facto laws don’t apply to 2 sex offenders

February 26, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Supreme Court affirmed two men had to register as sex offenders after moving from other states, saying the requirement did not violate the Indiana Constitution’s prohibition against ex post facto laws.
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Schedule set for final Supreme Court interviews

February 26, 2016
IL Staff
The final interview schedule on March 3-4 for 15 applicants vying to replace Justice Brent Dickson on the Indiana Supreme Court was released Friday by the Judicial Nominating Commission.
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Former dentistry clinic director sues IU over firing

February 26, 2016
Indianapolis Business Journal, John Russell
A former clinic director at the Indiana University School of Dentistry in Indianapolis who was fired last year after students complained he inappropriately touched them is suing to get his job back, saying he was denied a fair hearing
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Pence names former Indianapolis police chief Hite to post

February 26, 2016
 Associated Press
The former chief of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department will now head the Indiana Civil Rights Commission following an appointment by Gov. Mike Pence.
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Apple's best arguments against the US over iPhone access

February 25, 2016
 Bloomberg News
Apple has just days left to marshal its legal arguments in the biggest battle in a generation pitting public safety against personal privacy: the U.S. government versus one of the world’s most powerful technology companies.
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FBI investigating Indiana hatchet attack as hate crime

February 25, 2016
 Associated Press
A recent hatchet attack near Bloomington against a high school exchange student from China is being investigated by the FBI as a possible hate crime.
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COA: Wood boiler cannot be used while court case is pending

February 25, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals reversed the denial of a preliminary injunction sought by a couple, finding they could stop neighbors from using an outside wood boiler during their legal action.
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COA agrees state did not interfere with defense

February 25, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed a man’s convictions for criminal confinement and domestic battery, among other charges, after it found the state did not interfere by not allowing one of the man’s witnesses to testify.
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6 states sue Obama administration over Affordable Care Act

February 25, 2016
 Associated Press, IL Staff
Six states, including Indiana, filed a new lawsuit Wednesday against the Obama administration over the Affordable Care Act.
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Suit aims to strike down law barring vote by committed mentally ill

February 25, 2016
Dave Stafford
A proposed class-action lawsuit naming state election officials and the clerk of Jefferson County argues a 1995 state law preventing people committed to a state hospital from voting in local elections is unconstitutional.
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Lawmakers back dropping 'he' references to state officials

February 25, 2016
 Associated Press
Legislators have approved replacing all the male pronouns in laws describing the duties of Indiana's statewide officeholders with gender-neutral terms.
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Residential substance abuse treatment grant applications sought

February 25, 2016
IL Staff
Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners grant applications are being accepted until March 31, the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute announced Thursday.
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14th Amendment rights not violated by voice test

February 25, 2016
Scott Roberts
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals found a man’s 14th Amendment rights were not violated when he was asked to take a voice stress test as part of an administrative investigation into possible wrongdoing as a police officer.
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Court finds double jeopardy in stalking case

February 24, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Court of Appeals reversed and remanded a man’s conviction of stalking as a Class C felony to Dearborn Superior Court because of double jeopardy violations. The court did uphold invasion of privacy charges and the revocation of his probation.
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Indianapolis man convicted of murder in home explosion

February 24, 2016
 Associated Press
An Indianapolis man was convicted of murder, arson and insurance fraud on Wednesday for his role in a 2012 house explosion that killed two neighbors and devastated a subdivision in the southern part of the city.
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ESPN makes appeal for Notre Dame police records

February 24, 2016
Dave Stafford
ESPN Inc. argued public policy, legislative intent and precedent in Indiana and other states favor a Court of Appeals order for University of Notre Dame police to release records of incidents involving student athletes.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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