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Law School Briefs - 5/22/13

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Law School Briefs

Law School Briefs highlights news from law schools in Indiana. While Indiana Lawyer has always covered law school news and continues to keep up with law school websites and press releases for updates, we gladly accept submissions for this section from law students, professors, alumni, and others who want to share law school-related news. If you’d like to submit news or a photo from an event, please email it to Marilyn Odendahl at modendahl@ibj.com, along with contact information for any follow-up questions at least two weeks prior to the issue date.

IU McKinney symposium marksanniversary of LL.M. program

The Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law recently celebrated the 10th anniversary of its Master of Laws Program. The school welcomed returning LL.M. alumni April 9 for a daylong symposium, “International Legal Education in the 21st Century: Preparing Lawyers to Meet Global Challenges.”

McKinney alumna Judge Patricia Riley of the Indiana Court of Appeals was the keynote speaker. She reflected on her travels and work in Kenya as part of the Legal Aid Centre of Eldoret program.

Audience members also heard from panels that explored issues related to the overall theme of the event. The first panel focused on “New Realities and Global Challenges.” The second panel discussed “LL.M. McKinney Law Graduates in Diverse Settings.”

IU Maurer professor named to colloquium for best teachers

roberts-15col.jpg Retiring Dean Gary Roberts of the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law stands next to his portrait commemorating his tenure as dean. The portrait, painted by Indianapolis artist Donna Carr, was unveiled during the school’s 2013 annual alumni awards celebration. Roberts was painted with his son Andrew’s dog, Addie. (Photo submitted)

Carwina Weng, clinical professor of law at the Indiana University Maurer School of Law, is among the newest I.U. Bloomington members on the Faculty Colloquium on Excellence in Teaching (FACET). An interdisciplinary organization, FACET is composed of more than 500 of I.U.’s best teachers.

Weng joined the university in 2006 and is the director of the Disability Law Clinic. She leads efforts to assist clients with Social Security and Medicaid disability benefits.

Notre Dame professor honored for community-based research

Judith Fox, clinical professor of law at the Notre Dame Law School, has been recognized with the 2013 Rodney F. Ganey, Ph.D., Faculty Community-Based Research Award. This honor, given annually by the Notre Dame Center for Social Concerns, comes with a monetary prize of $5,000 and honors a faculty member whose research has made a contribution in collaboration with local community organizations.

Fox has worked with both undergraduate and law students from the university in cooperation with the United Way of St. Joseph County and other community partners to address the issues of foreclosures, debt collection and predatory lending in St. Joseph County.

Notre Dame among best in USat getting federal clerkships

Nine months after graduating, 18 members of the Notre Dame Law School class of 2012 reported having secured federal clerkships. The percentage of 2012 graduates in clerkships, 9 percent, ties Notre Dame for 10th place among all law schools nationwide, according to the American Bar Association.

Notre Dame prepares its law students for federal judicial clerkships through academic programs that focus on public law and Constitutional structure as well as through the law school’s Career Development Office.•

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  1. What is this, the Ind Supreme Court thinking that there is a separation of powers and limited enumerated powers as delegated by a dusty old document? Such eighteen century thinking, so rare and unwanted by the elites in this modern age. Dictate to us, dictate over us, the massess are chanting! George Soros agrees. Time to change with times Ind Supreme Court, says all President Snows. Rule by executive decree is the new black.

  2. I made the same argument before a commission of the Indiana Supreme Court and then to the fedeal district and federal appellate courts. Fell flat. So very glad to read that some judges still beleive that evidentiary foundations matter.

  3. KUDOS to the Indiana Supreme Court for realizing that some bureacracies need to go to the stake. Recall what RWR said: "No government ever voluntarily reduces itself in size. Government programs, once launched, never disappear. Actually, a government bureau is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth!" NOW ... what next to this rare and inspiring chopping block? Well, the Commission on Gender and Race (but not religion!?!) is way overdue. And some other Board's could be cut with a positive for State and the reputation of the Indiana judiciary.

  4. During a visit where an informant with police wears audio and video, does the video necessary have to show hand to hand transaction of money and narcotics?

  5. I will agree with that as soon as law schools stop lying to prospective students about salaries and employment opportunities in the legal profession. There is no defense to the fraudulent numbers first year salaries they post to mislead people into going to law school.

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