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Law School Briefs -4/13/12

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Law School Briefs

Law School Briefs highlights news from law schools in Indiana. While Indiana Lawyer has always covered law school news and continues to keep up with law school websites and press releases for updates, we gladly accept submissions for this section from law students, professors, alumni, and others who want to share law school-related news. If you’d like to submit news or a photo from an event, please email it to Jenny Montgomery at jmontgomery@ibj.com, along with contact information for any follow-up questions at least two weeks prior to the issue date.

New faculty at IU McKinney

The Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law will welcome four new associate professors for the fall 2012 semester: Yvonne M. Dutton, Margaret Ryznar, Lea Shaver and Diana R. H. Winters.

Dutton currently is a chair and instructor of lawyering skills at the University of San Diego School of Law. She also has taught as an adjunct at the University of Colorado School of Law and was a fellow in the Careers in Law Teaching Program at Columbia Law School, where she earned her Juris Doctor and was on the editorial staff for the Columbia Law Review. She also was a Stone Scholar throughout her law school career.

Ryznar is currently an associate at the Washington, D.C.-based firm Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft. She also served as a clerk for the Hon. Myron H. Bright of the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals. She received her Juris Doctor, cum laude, from the University of Notre Dame Law School, where she was a note editor for the Notre Dame Law Review.

Shaver is associate professor at Hofstra Law School, where she teaches intellectual property, patent law and transnational law. She received her Juris Doctor from Yale Law School, where she was a Coker Fellow in Constitutional Law and was the submissions and articles editor for the Yale Human Rights & Development Law Journal. She was a Fulbright Scholar at the Centre for Applied Legal Studies at South Africa’s University of the Witwatersand law school. She also served as a summer clerk to the Hon. David F. Hamilton when he was on the bench of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana.

Winters is a visiting assistant professor of law and Health Law Scholar at Boston University School of Law, where she has taught environmental law, environmental litigation and advanced civil procedures. She also worked as a graduate teaching assistant at Harvard University, where she received her Ph.D. in the History of the American Civilization, and a master’s in history. She received her Juris Doctor cum laude, from New York University School of Law, where she received the Dean’s Scholarship.•

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  1. File under the Sociology of Hoosier Discipline ... “We will be answering the complaint in due course and defending against the commission’s allegations,” said Indianapolis attorney Don Lundberg, who’s representing Hudson in her disciplinary case. FOR THOSE WHO DO NOT KNOW ... Lundberg ran the statist attorney disciplinary machinery in Indy for decades, and is now the "go to guy" for those who can afford him .... the ultimate insider for the well-to-do and/or connected who find themselves in the crosshairs. It would appear that this former prosecutor knows how the game is played in Circle City ... and is sacrificing accordingly. See more on that here ... http://www.theindianalawyer.com/supreme-court-reprimands-attorney-for-falsifying-hours-worked/PARAMS/article/43757 Legal sociologists could have a field day here ... I wonder why such things are never studied? Is a sacrifice to the well connected former regulators a de facto bribe? Such questions, if probed, could bring about a more just world, a more equal playing field, less Stalinist governance. All of the things that our preambles tell us to value could be advanced if only sunshine reached into such dark worlds. As a great jurist once wrote: "Publicity is justly commended as a remedy for social and industrial diseases. Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants; electric light the most efficient policeman." Other People's Money—and How Bankers Use It (1914). Ah, but I am certifiable, according to the Indiana authorities, according to the ISC it can be read, for believing such trite things and for advancing such unwanted thoughts. As a great albeit fictional and broken resistance leaders once wrote: "I am the dead." Winston Smith Let us all be dead to the idea of maintaining a patently unjust legal order.

  2. The Department of Education still has over $100 million of ITT Education Services money in the form of $100+ million Letters of Credit. That money was supposed to be used by The DOE to help students. The DOE did nothing to help students. The DOE essentially stole the money from ITT Tech and still has the money. The trustee should be going after the DOE to get the money back for people who are owed that money, including shareholders.

  3. Do you know who the sponsor of the last-minute amendment was?

  4. Law firms of over 50 don't deliver good value, thats what this survey really tells you. Anybody that has seen what they bill for compared to what they deliver knows that already, however.

  5. As one of the many consumers affected by this breach, I found my bank data had been lifted and used to buy over $200 of various merchandise in New York. I did a pretty good job of tracing the purchases to stores around a college campus just from the info on my bank statement. Hm. Mr. Hill, I would like my $200 back! It doesn't belong to the state, in my opinion. Give it back to the consumers affected. I had to freeze my credit and take out data protection, order a new debit card and wait until it arrived. I deserve something for my trouble!

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