ILNews

Law School Briefs - 10/12/11

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share
Law School Briefs

Law School Briefs is Indiana Lawyer’s section highlighting news from law schools in Indiana. While IL has always covered law school news and continues to keep up with law school websites and press releases for updates, we gladly accept submissions for this section from law students, professors, alumni, and others who want to share law school-related news. If you’d like to submit news or a photo from an event, please send it to Jenny Montgomery at jmontgomery@ibj.com, along with contact information for any follow-up questions at least two weeks in advance of the issue date.

Counterterrorism event

On Oct. 27 and 28, Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis will hold a counterterrorism discussion and simulation as part of professor Shawn Boyne’s Seminar in Comparative National Security Law.

Nicholas Beadle, CMG, United Kingdom National Security Council, Cabinet Office, London, will talk about “The Legality of NATO’s Intervention in Libya” at 5 p.m. Oct. 27 in the Wynne Courtroom, Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St., Indianapolis. A reception is scheduled at 6 p.m. One hour of continuing legal education credit is available.

Beadle is a former senior adviser to the prime minister of the UK. He led the cabinet office’s Afghanistan/Pakistan strategy teams and is currently working on Libya, Yemen and Syria.

On Oct. 28, a counterterrorism simulation will be webcast at 8 a.m. At noon, former U.S. Rep. Lee Hamilton will lecture on homeland security. From 1:30 to 3 p.m., a panel will discuss intervention in Libya. One hour of CLE credit is available. Additional agenda information is available by visiting http://indylaw.indiana.edu/news/ and selecting “upcoming events.” To attend, call 317-278-4300 and leave a name and telephone number.

Human rights study

Two Indiana University research centers will share a $100,000 grant from the United States Department of State for the study of human rights violations in Libya.

The IU Maurer School of Law Center for Constitutional Democracy and the IU Center for the Study of the Middle East will collaborate with the Istituto Superiore Internazionale di Scienze Criminali in Siracusa, Italy, on the project. Together, they will gather evidence of human rights violations in support of the investigation of the Libya Inquiry Commission appointed by the United Nations Human Rights Council.

The project will be under the supervision of three faculty at the Maurer School of Law: Ambassador Feisal Amin Rasoul Istrabadi, University Scholar in International Law and Diplomacy and director of the Center for the Study of the Middle East; David C. Williams, John S. Hastings Professor of Law and executive director of the Center for Constitutional Democracy; and Timothy William Waters, associate professor of law.

“We are pleased to receive this grant and look forward to working with the State Department and the U.N.,” Istrabadi said. “The funding confirms the strength of Middle Eastern studies and human rights at Indiana University.”

The Libya Inquiry Commission is chaired by M. Cherif Bassiouni, an IU alumnus and Distinguished Research Professor of Law Emeritus at DePaul University College of Law in Chicago. The other two commissioners are Philippe Kirsch, the first president of the International Criminal Court, and Asma Khader, a Jordanian women’s rights lawyer and former cabinet minister. The team’s research is expected to be completed in 2012.•

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Indiana State Bar Association

Indianapolis Bar Association

Evansville Bar Association

Allen County Bar Association

Indiana Lawyer on Facebook

facebook
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. Being dedicated to a genre keeps it alive until the masses catch up to the "trend." Kent and Bill are keepin' it LIVE!! Thank you gentlemen..you know your JAZZ.

  2. Hemp has very little THC which is needed to kill cancer cells! Growing cannabis plants for THC inside a hemp field will not work...where is the fear? From not really knowing about Cannabis and Hemp or just not listening to the people teaching you through testimonies and packets of info over the last few years! Wake up Hoosier law makers!

  3. If our State Government would sue for their rights to grow HEMP like Kentucky did we would not have these issues. AND for your INFORMATION many medical items are also made from HEMP. FOOD, FUEL,FIBER,TEXTILES and MEDICINE are all uses for this plant. South Bend was built on Hemp. Our states antiquated fear of cannabis is embarrassing on the world stage. We really need to lead the way rather than follow. Some day.. we will have freedom in Indiana. And I for one will continue to educate the good folks of this state to the beauty and wonder of this magnificent plant.

  4. Put aside all the marijuana concerns, we are talking about food and fiber uses here. The federal impediments to hemp cultivation are totally ridiculous. Preposterous. Biggest hemp cultivators are China and Europe. We get most of ours from Canada. Hemp is as versatile as any crop ever including corn and soy. It's good the governor laid the way for this, regrettable the buffoons in DC stand in the way. A statutory relic of the failed "war on drugs"

  5. Cannabis is GOOD for our PEOPLE and GOOD for our STATE... 78% would like to see legal access to the product line for better Hoosier Heath. There is a 25% drop in PAIN KILLER Overdoses in states where CANNABIS is legal.

ADVERTISEMENT