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Law School Briefs - 4/27/11

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Law School Briefs

Law School Briefs is Indiana Lawyer’s section highlighting news from law schools in Indiana. While IL has always covered law school news and continues to keep up with law school websites and press releases for updates, we gladly accept submissions for this section from law students, professors, alumni, and others who want to share law school-related news. If you’d like to submit news or a photo from an event, please send it to Jenny Montgomery at jmontgomery@ibj.com, along with contact information for any follow-up questions at least two weeks in advance of the issue date.

IU Maurer inducts fellows

Five Indiana University Maurer School of Law alumni were inducted April 1 into the school’s Academy of Law Alumni Fellows. Induction into the academy is the highest honor the law school bestows on its graduates.

According to the law school, the academy consists of an elite group that includes U.S. senators, federal judges, successful business leaders, and distinguished practitioners. The 2011 inductees include a former U.S. attorney, a civic leader and entrepreneur, an accomplished corporate lawyer, an NFL labor lawyer, and a distinguished legal scholar.

“Our newest additions to the Academy of Law Alumni Fellows have achieved success in a number of professions,” said Lauren Robel, dean and Val Nolan Professor of Law. “The inductees also have gone above and beyond to use their talents to make the world a better place. We are honored to call them alumni of our school.”

The 2011 Academy of Law Alumni Fellows are:
 

applegate-edwin-mug Applegate

K. Edwin Applegate is a World War II veteran who opened his first law firm in Bloomington in 1949. He was U.S. commissioner, Southern District of Indiana, from 1951 to 1958; deputy prosecutor for Monroe County and municipal judge for Bloomington from 1958 to 1965; and in 1965, as a representative in the Indiana General Assembly, he was primary author of the bill that established Ivy Tech Community College. In 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed him as U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Indiana, a position he held until 1970.


ferguson-steve-mug Ferguson

Stephen L. Ferguson was elected to the Indiana House of Representatives in 1966, serving four terms while establishing a law practice in Bloomington. He played a key role in the growth of Cook Medical, an internationally known leader in the medical devices industry. In addition to serving as attorney for the company, he has been chairman and chief operating officer of its parent, Cook Group Inc., and has been responsible for renovation and operation of the historic French Lick Resort. Ferguson has been elected or appointed to the boards of directors of many organizations, including serving 12 years on the IU board of trustees, four of them as president, and has been named a Sagamore of the Wabash by three Indiana governors.


irwin-neil-mug Irwin

R. Neil Irwin has been respected counsel to diverse corporate clients and a recognized leader in the Phoenix community. Raised on an Indiana farm, he served in the U.S. Army before attending law school, where he was elected to Order of the Coif and served on the Indiana Law Journal. The senior partner in the Phoenix office of the international law firm Bryan Cave, Irwin has been instrumental in establishing public company relationships in diverse industries, including vehicle rentals, healthcare insurance, renewable energy, and retail sales. He also has been involved in key business and civic organizations that have brought employment, educational and cultural venues, and improved civic infrastructure to the Phoenix region. He is a member of the Maurer School of Law’s board of visitors.


prevot-rapheal-mug Prevot

Rapheal M. Prevot Jr. served as labor relations counsel for the National Football League in New York for more than 15 years. Previously, he was assistant attorney in the Dade County, Fla., state attorney’s office and a litigation attorney at Adorno & Zeder, a Florida law firm. Prevot was a dedicated member of the National Bar Association and was inducted into the Entertainment, Sports and Art Law section of its hall of fame. Despite living on the East Coast, Prevot was an active member of the Maurer school’s alumni board beginning in 1993 and on the board of visitors since 1997, where he was elected the youngest president in board history. With his untimely death in 2008 at 49, the legal community lost a dedicated and talented professional.


west-martha-mug West

Martha S. West, a distinguished legal scholar and professor, is a tireless advocate for women in many walks of life. As a student at the IU Maurer School of Law, she organized the Women’s Caucus and developed a course on women and law. After graduating, West clerked for Judge Jesse Eschbach and then joined Ice Miller in Indianapolis, practicing labor and employment law for three years. From 1979 to 1982 she represented Indiana Chrysler workers at UAW Legal Services. West joined the University of California Davis Law School faculty in 1982, where she taught labor law, employment discrimination, and sex-based discrimination for 25 years. In 1998 she founded the Family Protection Clinic to provide family law representation for battered women and their children. After retiring, West served as general counsel for the American Association of University Professors from 2008 to 2010. She continues to lecture widely on issues relevant to women in education and work-life balance.

IU-Indy prof named Loyola law dean

Indiana University School of Law–Indianapolis announced on April 15 that Professor María Pabón López, has accepted a position as dean of Loyola University College of Law in New Orleans.

A native of Puerto Rico and an expert on immigration law, Professor López will assume her new duties as dean this summer.

Dean Gary Roberts said, “Loyola has a strong focus on Latin America and on social justice, two areas that fit perfectly with her interests and background. So I am excited and very happy for her, although as the dean of this law school I am distraught over losing her. I know all of us here feel the same way. She will be missed terribly and she will always be welcome back here at IU-Indianapolis.”

López joined Indiana University in the fall of 2002 as assistant professor. She was promoted to associate professor in 2006 and has been professor of law since 2008.

A prolific writer, she received many awards during her tenure in Indianapolis, including the 2008 Diversity Attorney in Practice Award from the Indiana Lawyer and the 2007 Rabb Emison Diversity Award from the Indiana State Bar Association. López received the 2006 Trustees Teaching Award from Indiana University.

Notre Dame director search

The Notre Dame Law School invites applications for the position of director of its new Intellectual Property and Entrepreneurship Clinic. The position will begin for the 2011-2012 academic year.

When it is fully implemented, the clinic will provide students opportunities to work as lawyers to meet the intellectual property and entrepreneurship-related needs of the clinic’s clients. The clinic will have a transactional focus and particularly will assist clients with, among other matters, entity formation, licensing and/or freedom to operate agreements, trademark counseling and prosecution, and patent preparation and prosecution. Specific client matters will be determined by the clinic director, although decisions about the overall direction of the clinic’s work will be made in consultation with the dean and other law school faculty members.

More information about the position is available on the school’s website: http://law.nd.edu/.•

– IL Staff

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  1. I have been on this program while on parole from 2011-2013. No person should be forced mentally to share private details of their personal life with total strangers. Also giving permission for a mental therapist to report to your parole agent that your not participating in group therapy because you don't have the financial mean to be in the group therapy. I was personally singled out and sent back three times for not having money and also sent back within the six month when you aren't to be sent according to state law. I will work to het this INSOMM's removed from this state. I also had twelve or thirteen parole agents with a fifteen month period. Thanks for your time.

  2. Our nation produces very few jurists of the caliber of Justice DOUGLAS and his peers these days. Here is that great civil libertarian, who recognized government as both a blessing and, when corrupted by ideological interests, a curse: "Once the investigator has only the conscience of government as a guide, the conscience can become ‘ravenous,’ as Cromwell, bent on destroying Thomas More, said in Bolt, A Man For All Seasons (1960), p. 120. The First Amendment mirrors many episodes where men, harried and harassed by government, sought refuge in their conscience, as these lines of Thomas More show: ‘MORE: And when we stand before God, and you are sent to Paradise for doing according to your conscience, *575 and I am damned for not doing according to mine, will you come with me, for fellowship? ‘CRANMER: So those of us whose names are there are damned, Sir Thomas? ‘MORE: I don't know, Your Grace. I have no window to look into another man's conscience. I condemn no one. ‘CRANMER: Then the matter is capable of question? ‘MORE: Certainly. ‘CRANMER: But that you owe obedience to your King is not capable of question. So weigh a doubt against a certainty—and sign. ‘MORE: Some men think the Earth is round, others think it flat; it is a matter capable of question. But if it is flat, will the King's command make it round? And if it is round, will the King's command flatten it? No, I will not sign.’ Id., pp. 132—133. DOUGLAS THEN WROTE: Where government is the Big Brother,11 privacy gives way to surveillance. **909 But our commitment is otherwise. *576 By the First Amendment we have staked our security on freedom to promote a multiplicity of ideas, to associate at will with kindred spirits, and to defy governmental intrusion into these precincts" Gibson v. Florida Legislative Investigation Comm., 372 U.S. 539, 574-76, 83 S. Ct. 889, 908-09, 9 L. Ed. 2d 929 (1963) Mr. Justice DOUGLAS, concurring. I write: Happy Memorial Day to all -- God please bless our fallen who lived and died to preserve constitutional governance in our wonderful series of Republics. And God open the eyes of those government officials who denounce the constitutions of these Republics by arbitrary actions arising out capricious motives.

  3. From back in the day before secularism got a stranglehold on Hoosier jurists comes this great excerpt via Indiana federal court judge Allan Sharp, dedicated to those many Indiana government attorneys (with whom I have dealt) who count the law as a mere tool, an optional tool that is not to be used when political correctness compels a more acceptable result than merely following the path that the law directs: ALLEN SHARP, District Judge. I. In a scene following a visit by Henry VIII to the home of Sir Thomas More, playwriter Robert Bolt puts the following words into the mouths of his characters: Margaret: Father, that man's bad. MORE: There is no law against that. ROPER: There is! God's law! MORE: Then God can arrest him. ROPER: Sophistication upon sophistication! MORE: No, sheer simplicity. The law, Roper, the law. I know what's legal not what's right. And I'll stick to what's legal. ROPER: Then you set man's law above God's! MORE: No, far below; but let me draw your attention to a fact I'm not God. The currents and eddies of right and wrong, which you find such plain sailing, I can't navigate. I'm no voyager. But in the thickets of law, oh, there I'm a forester. I doubt if there's a man alive who could follow me there, thank God... ALICE: (Exasperated, pointing after Rich) While you talk, he's gone! MORE: And go he should, if he was the Devil himself, until he broke the law! ROPER: So now you'd give the Devil benefit of law! MORE: Yes. What would you do? Cut a great road through the law to get after the Devil? ROPER: I'd cut down every law in England to do that! MORE: (Roused and excited) Oh? (Advances on Roper) And when the last law was down, and the Devil turned round on you where would you hide, Roper, the laws being flat? (He leaves *1257 him) This country's planted thick with laws from coast to coast man's laws, not God's and if you cut them down and you're just the man to do it d'you really think you would stand upright in the winds that would blow then? (Quietly) Yes, I'd give the Devil benefit of law, for my own safety's sake. ROPER: I have long suspected this; this is the golden calf; the law's your god. MORE: (Wearily) Oh, Roper, you're a fool, God's my god... (Rather bitterly) But I find him rather too (Very bitterly) subtle... I don't know where he is nor what he wants. ROPER: My God wants service, to the end and unremitting; nothing else! MORE: (Dryly) Are you sure that's God! He sounds like Moloch. But indeed it may be God And whoever hunts for me, Roper, God or Devil, will find me hiding in the thickets of the law! And I'll hide my daughter with me! Not hoist her up the mainmast of your seagoing principles! They put about too nimbly! (Exit More. They all look after him). Pgs. 65-67, A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS A Play in Two Acts, Robert Bolt, Random House, New York, 1960. Linley E. Pearson, Atty. Gen. of Indiana, Indianapolis, for defendants. Childs v. Duckworth, 509 F. Supp. 1254, 1256 (N.D. Ind. 1981) aff'd, 705 F.2d 915 (7th Cir. 1983)

  4. "Meanwhile small- and mid-size firms are getting squeezed and likely will not survive unless they become a boutique firm." I've been a business attorney in small, and now mid-size firm for over 30 years, and for over 30 years legal consultants have been preaching this exact same mantra of impending doom for small and mid-sized firms -- verbatim. This claim apparently helps them gin up merger opportunities from smaller firms who become convinced that they need to become larger overnight. The claim that large corporations are interested in cost-saving and efficiency has likewise been preached for decades, and is likewise bunk. If large corporations had any real interest in saving money they wouldn't use large law firms whose rates are substantially higher than those of high-quality mid-sized firms.

  5. The family is the foundation of all human government. That is the Grand Design. Modern governments throw off this Design and make bureaucratic war against the family, as does Hollywood and cultural elitists such as third wave feminists. Since WWII we have been on a ship of fools that way, with both the elite and government and their social engineering hacks relentlessly attacking the very foundation of social order. And their success? See it in the streets of Fergusson, on the food stamp doles (mostly broken families)and in the above article. Reject the Grand Design for true social function, enter the Glorious State to manage social dysfunction. Our Brave New World will be a prison camp, and we will welcome it as the only way to manage given the anarchy without it.

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