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ACLU conference, dinner open to all

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The Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis will host the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana Student Conference that will focus on issues faced by students at the high school, college, and law school levels.

The conference, which is open to the public, will be from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Oct. 16 at Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St.

The conference will be followed by the ACLU-Indiana Annual Dinner at the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Student Center, 4th Floor, beginning at 6 p.m.

The conference’s theme is “The Life of Jane Addams.” It will honor various aspects of Addams’ life, including her time as a social worker, suffragist, anti-war protestor, founding member of the ACLU and NAACP, and first woman Nobel Peace Prize winner, which she won in 1931.

Following breakfast and registration from 8 to 9 a.m., ACLU-IN legal director Kenneth Falk will discuss “The Current Status of Civil Liberties,” followed by breakout sessions.

Susan Curtis of Purdue University’s Department of History will present a “Historical View of Jane Addams” that will explore her 18th century life during the luncheon from 12:15 to 1:15 p.m.

Workshops in the morning will include Butler University professor Terri Jett and ACLU-IN board member Daryl Campbell presenting a film and discussion, “Know Your Rights When Stopped By Police”; immigration rights and issues will be discussed by Juan Solana of the Consulate of Mexico in Indianapolis and Sister Marikay Duffy of St. Mary’s Parish in Indianapolis; and social networking and privacy issues will be addressed by Baker & Daniels partner Kevin R. Erdman.

Afternoon workshops include a discussion about religion in schools, which will include Eric Workman, a plaintiff in a case involving Greenwood High School’s decision to have prayer at its graduation ceremony; “How Straight People Can Advance LGBT Rights,” presented by Indiana native, Ball State University graduate, and current Miss New York Claire Buffie, with M. Cripe, former PFLAG board member; and reproductive rights and the national health policy, addressed by Betty Cockrum, chief executive officer of Planned Parenthood of Indiana, with ACLU-IN board member Mikki Randolph.

Following the workshops, participants will be able to discuss how to have a successful student chapter, featuring professor Tom Kotulak of Indiana University-Southeast, officers of the ACLU of Indiana IU-Southeast Chapter, and ACLU of Indiana Executive Director Gilbert Holmes.

A public reception will begin at 6 p.m., and dinner will be served at 7 p.m. The dinner will honor Indianapolis attorney Irving L. Fink for his lifelong commitment to protecting civil rights for all Indiana residents, including prisoners, conscientious objectors to the Vietnam War, and the Ku Klux Klan leadership. He also had a hand in helping found the ACLU of Indiana and the organization now known as Indiana Legal Services.

Buffie will be the keynote speaker and will discuss advocacy work for equal rights. Her platform is, “Straight for Equality: Let’s Talk.”

Registration for just the conference is $25 and includes parking at Lot 85 on the corner of California and New York streets, a continental breakfast, and a light lunch. Registration for the conference and annual dinner is $75 for students and $100 without a student ID.

More information, including how to register, can be found at www.aclu-in.org. Registration and payment must be received by Oct. 6.

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  1. Indianapolis employers harassment among minorities AFRICAN Americans needs to be discussed the metro Indianapolis area is horrible when it comes to harassing African American employees especially in the local healthcare facilities. Racially profiling in the workplace is an major issue. Please make it better because I'm many civil rights leaders would come here and justify that Indiana is a state the WORKS only applies to Caucasian Americans especially in Hamilton county. Indiana targets African Americans in the workplace so when governor pence is trying to convince people to vote for him this would be awesome publicity for the Presidency Elections.

  2. Wishing Mary Willis only God's best, and superhuman strength, as she attempts to right a ship that too often strays far off course. May she never suffer this personal affect, as some do who attempt to change a broken system: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QojajMsd2nE

  3. Indiana's seatbelt law is not punishable as a crime. It is an infraction. Apparently some of our Circuit judges have deemed settled law inapplicable if it fails to fit their litmus test of political correctness. Extrapolating to redefine terms of behavior in a violation of immigration law to the entire body of criminal law leaves a smorgasbord of opportunity for judicial mischief.

  4. I wonder if $10 diversions for failure to wear seat belts are considered moral turpitude in federal immigration law like they are under Indiana law? Anyone know?

  5. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

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